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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8. Search the whole document.

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Fort Johnston (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
tions in issue, and decided irrevocably against the right of the British parliament to tax the colonies. In Brunswick county, Robert Howe, formerly captain of Fort Johnston, employed himself in training the people to arms; though Martin, the royal governor, held his military talents in light esteem. At Newbern, the capital, whoseerland, volunteers openly formed themselves into independent companies. Afraid of being seized, Martin, suddenly shipping his family to New York, retreated to Fort Johnston on Cape Fear river. He had repeatedly offered to raise a battalion from the Scottish Highlanders in Carolina, and declared himself sure of the Chap. XLVI.} , aged, but still with hair jet black, a stately figure, and a countenance that expressed intelligence and steadfastness. On the third of July he came down to Fort Johnston, and concerted with Martin the raising a battalion of the good and faithful Highlanders, in which he was himself to be major, and Alexander Macleod, an officer
Dundee (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
irit of resistance, quickened by the tidings which came in from Bunker Hill, extended itself more to and more widely and deeply. On the waters of Albermarle Sound, over which the adventurous skiffs of the first settlers of Carolina had glided before the waters of the Chesapeake were known to Englishmen, the movement was assisted by the writings of young James Iredell, from England; by the letters and counsels of Joseph Hewes; and by the calm wisdom of Samuel Johnston of Edenton, a native of Dundee in Scotland, a man revered for his integrity, thoroughly opposed to disorder and to revolution, if revolution could be avoided without yielding to oppression. The last provincial congress had invested him contingently with power to call a new one; on the tenth of July he issued his summons to the people of North Carolina to elect their delegates. But two days later, Dartmouth wrote from the king: I hope that in North Carolina the governor may not be reduced to the disgraceful necessity of
James Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
en; but the council of safety order Chap. XLVI.} 1775. July to Oct. ed William Moultrie, colonel of the second regiment, to take possession of Fort Johnson on James Island. Aware of the design, the governor sent a party to throw the guns and carriages from the platform; and on the fifteenth of September, having suddenly dissolveharles Cotesworth Pinckney, Bernard Elliott, and Francis Marion, under Lieutenant Colonel Motte, dropped down with the ebb tide from Gadsden's wharf, landed on James Island and entered the fort, in which but three or four men remained. Lord William Campbell sent Innis, his secretary, in the boat of the Tamer, to demand by what auson and the town, to intercept the manof-war's boats. A post was established at Haddrell's Point, and a fort on Sullivan's Island was proposed. The tents on James Island contained at least five hun- Chap. XLVI.} 1775. July to Oct. dred men well armed and clad, soldier-like in theirdeportment, and strictly disciplined. They we
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
of the king as an infatuation. Martin, of North Carolina, making himself busy with the affairs of h, and go a great way to reduce Georgia and North Carolina to a sense of their duty. Charleston is tf the continent will soon be at an end. North Carolina, fourth among the thirteen colonies in imp Compelled by poverty, they had removed to North Carolina in 1774, and made their new home in the wetmouth wrote from the king: I hope that in North Carolina the governor may not be reduced to the dis the twenty-first of August, the people of North Carolina assembled at Hillsborough in a congress, cion, stands out as the foremost patriot of North Carolina, efficient in building up society on its ntality, of commerce, wealth, and culture. North Carolina was always prompt to respond to the call ohnston interposed; and, by his persuasion, North Carolina consented to forego the honor of being thead made him honored as the Samuel Adams of North Carolina. Thus prepared, the people of that colony[1 more...]
Scotland (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 6
Pennsylvania. After the termination of the seven years war, very few of the Highland regiment returned home; soldiers and officers choosing rather to accept grants of land in America for settlement. Many also of the inhabitants of North Western Scotland, especially of the clans of Macdonald and Macleod, listened to overtures from those who had obtained concessions of vast domains, and migrated to Middle Carolina; tearing themselves, with bitterest grief, from kindred whose sorrow at Chap. of the Chesapeake were known to Englishmen, the movement was assisted by the writings of young James Iredell, from England; by the letters and counsels of Joseph Hewes; and by the calm wisdom of Samuel Johnston of Edenton, a native of Dundee in Scotland, a man revered for his integrity, thoroughly opposed to disorder and to revolution, if revolution could be avoided without yielding to oppression. The last provincial congress had invested him contingently with power to call a new one; on the t
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
tle or no business, he pressed for leave to return to England and explain and enforce his advice. The people met in congress; a council of safety maintained an executive supervision; local affairs were left to parochial committees; but the crown officers were not molested, and but for sympathy with South Carolina, and rumors of attempts to excite slaves to desolate the heart of the colony, Indians to lay waste the frontier, some good appearance of authority would have been kept up. When in Savannah the chief justice refused to accept bail for a South Carolina recruiting officer, a crowd Chap. XLVI.} 1775. July to Oct. broke open the gaol and set the prisoner free; and on the fifth of August he beat up for men at the door of to the chief justice himself and hard by the house of the governor. The militia officers were compelled to sign the association; and navigation was so effectually regulated, that a ship which arrived with two hundred and four slaves, was compelled to go away wit
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
oldier-like in theirdeportment, and strictly disciplined. They were taught not merely the use of the musket but the ex-to ercise of the great guns. The king's arsenal supplied cannon and balls. New gun carriages were soon constructed, for the mechanics, almost to a man, were hearty in the cause. Hundreds of negro laborers were brought in from the country to assist in work. None stopped to calculate expense. The heroic courage of the Carolinians, who, from a generous sympathy with Massachusetts, went forward to meet greater danger than any other province, was scoffed at by the representatives of the king as an infatuation. Martin, of North Carolina, making himself busy with the affairs of his neighbors, wrote in midsummer: The people of South Carolina forget entirely their own weakness and are blustering treason, while Charleston, that is the head and heart of their boasted province, might be destroyed by a single frigate, and the country thereby reduced to the last distress.
Camden, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ents in the low country; and hardly formed a majority of the inhabitants of the colony. The best educated were so unanimous, that when Campbell needed one more member of the council, to make up the quorum which required but three, he was under a necessity to appoint an Englishman who was collector of the port; for, said he, there is not another person in the province whom I can recommend, who would accept of that honor, in so low an estimation is it at present held. But in the districts of Camden and Ninety-six he was assured that thousands were animated by affection to the king. In the region from the line of the Catawba and Wateree to the Congaree and Saluda, and all the way to Georgia, embracing the part of South Carolina where there were the fewest slaves, the rude settlers had no close sympathy with the planters. Instead of raising indigo or rice, they were Chap. XLVI.} 1775. July to Oct. chiefly herdsmen; below, the Protestant Episcopal church was predominant; the land abov
Hispaniola (search for this): chapter 6
vereign exceeds all other considerations. But the greatest danger to the planters was from the sea, and the council of safety slowly and reluctantly admitted the necessity of defending the harbor of Charleston. During the summer, ships were boarded off Savannah river, and near St. Augustine, and more than twenty thousand pounds of gunpowder were obtained. The export of rice was allowed on no other terms than that it should be exchanged for arms and ammunition, which were obtained from Hispaniola and from the French and Dutch islands. The governor was all the while urging the ministry to employ force against the three southernmost provinces; and the patriots were conscious of his importunities. A free negro man of property, charged with the intention of piloting British ships up the channel to the city, perished on the gallows, though protesting his innocence. All who refused the association were disarmed, even though they were in the service of the crown. On the thirteenth of
Gadsden (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
sland. Aware of the design, the governor sent a party to throw the guns and carriages from the platform; and on the fifteenth of September, having suddenly dissolved the last royal assembly ever held in South Carolina, he fled for refuge to comfortless quarters on board the small man-of-war, the Tamer. During the previous night, three companies commanded by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, Bernard Elliott, and Francis Marion, under Lieutenant Colonel Motte, dropped down with the ebb tide from Gadsden's wharf, landed on James Island and entered the fort, in which but three or four men remained. Lord William Campbell sent Innis, his secretary, in the boat of the Tamer, to demand by what authority they had taken possession of his Majesty's fort; and an officer appeared and answered: We are American troops, under Lieutenant Colonel Motte; we hold the fort by the express command of the council of safety. By whom is this message given? Without hesitation the officer replied: I am Charles C
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