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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. Search the whole document.

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England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 7
d of their coming influence shaped her policy Chap. VI.} 1778. during their struggle. She was willing to encourage them so far as to exhaust the resources of Great Britain by one campaign more; but she was bent on restraining France from an alliance with them, till she should herself have wrung from their agents at Paris all the a war which had neither an object for its beginning, nor a plan Chap. VI.} 1778. for its close. Baffled in her policy by France, Spain next thought to use Great Britain as her instrument for repressing the growth of the United States. Her first wish was to prevent their self-existence, and, as mediator, to dictate the terms ond he answered, that while France supported the colonies in rebellion no negotiation could be entered into. Weymouth to Grantham, 20 May, 1778. But, as both Great Britain and Spain were interested in preserving colonial dependency, he invited a closer union between them, and even proposed an alliance. At this point in the neg
Gibraltar (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
nd some remnants of rancor against England, concurred to bind him to the compact between the two crowns. Moreover, Florida Blanca, who from the drudgery of a provincial attorney had risen to be the chief minister of a world-wide empire, had a passion to be spoken of in his time, and to gain a place in history: he, therefore, kept open the negotiations with France, designing to consent to a junction only after stipulations for extraordinary and most unequal advantages. For the recovery of Gibraltar he did not rely exclusively on a siege, Montmorin to Vergennes, 31 Aug., 1778. yet before the end of March he had collected battering cannon at Seville, and held at anchor in the bay of Cadiz a greater fleet than Spain had launched since the days of the armada. Avoiding an immediate choice between peace and war, Florida Blanca disdained the proposal of an alliance with the United States, and he demanded the postponement of active hostilities in European waters, that he might gain fre
m France all other advantages that she could derive from the war. She excused her importunities for delay by the necessity of providing for the defence of her colonies; the danger that would hang over her homeward-bound troops and commerce; the contingency of renewed schemes of conquest on the part of the Russians against the Ottoman empire; the succession of Bavaria; the propriety of coming to a previous understanding with the Netherlands, which was harried by England, and with the king of Prussia, who was known to favor the Americans. Count Florida Blanca to Count de Aranda, 13 Jan., 1778. Communicated with other documents from the Spanish archives by Don Pascual de Gayangos. Count Montmorin, the successor of d'ossun as French ambassador at Madrid, had in his childhood been a playmate of the king of France, whose friendship he retained, so that his position was one of independence and dignity. As a man of honor, he desired to deal fairly with the United States, and he obser
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
sistently and perseveringly hostile to the United States. With a true instinct she saw in their su honor, he desired to deal fairly with the United States, and he observed with impartiality the polate determination of France to support the United States, Florida Blanca quivered in every limb annstrument for repressing the growth of the United States. Her first wish was to prevent their selfcontrarieties, both as to the place of the United States in the conduct of the war, and still more ained the proposal of an alliance with the United States, and he demanded the postponement of activ he explained that the independence of the United States would overturn the balance of power on they north-west of the Ohio, and to bound the United States by the Alleghanies. But Lord Weymouth helations between the three great powers, the United States fell upon a wise measure. Franklin, from him Chap. VI.} 1778. the interests of the United States obtained a serene and wakeful guardian, wh[1 more...]
Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 7
nown to favor the Americans. Count Florida Blanca to Count de Aranda, 13 Jan., 1778. Communicated with other documents from the Spanish archives by Don Pascual de Gayangos. Count Montmorin, the successor of d'ossun as French ambassador at Madrid, had in his childhood been a playmate of the king of France, whose friendship he retained, so that his position was one of independence and dignity. As a man of honor, he desired to deal fairly with the United States, and he observed with impartkingdom was brought nearer to bankruptcy by straining the public credit without corre- Chap. VI.} 1778. sponding taxation. The diplomacy of Spain during the year proved still less effective. Florida Blanca began with the British minister at Madrid, by affecting ignorance of the measures of the French cabinet, and assuring him that his Catholic Majesty neither condemned nor justified the steps taken by France; but that, as they had been entered upon without the least concert with him, he th
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): chapter 7
hostile to the United States. With a true instinct she saw in their success the quickening example which was to break down the barriers of her own colonial system; and her dread of their coming influence shaped her policy Chap. VI.} 1778. during their struggle. She was willing to encourage them so far as to exhaust the resources of Great Britain by one campaign more; but she was bent on restraining France from an alliance with them, till she should herself have wrung from their agents at Paris all the concessions which she deemed essential to the security of her transatlantic dominions, and from France all other advantages that she could derive from the war. She excused her importunities for delay by the necessity of providing for the defence of her colonies; the danger that would hang over her homeward-bound troops and commerce; the contingency of renewed schemes of conquest on the part of the Russians against the Ottoman empire; the succession of Bavaria; the propriety of coming
Portsmouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 7
ule, repelled the pursuit of the Arethusa, and escaped. The French government, no longer able to remain inactive, authorized the capture of British merchantmen; and early in July its great fleet sailed out of July Brest. After returning to Portsmouth, Keppel put to sea once more. On the twenty-seventh, the two 27. admirals, each having thirty men-of-war in three divisions, and each professing the determination to fight a decisive battle, met off Ouessant. D'Orvilliers was better fitted for a monastery than the quarterdeck; and the British admiral wanted ability for so great a command. After an insignificant action, in Chap. VI.} 1778. which neither party lost a ship, the French returned to Brest, the British to Portsmouth. The French admiral ascribed his failure to the disobedience of the young Duke de Chartres, who had absurdly been placed over one of his divisions; Keppel, but only upon an after-thought, censured both Palliser, his second in command, and the admiralty; an
Seville (Spain) (search for this): chapter 7
a provincial attorney had risen to be the chief minister of a world-wide empire, had a passion to be spoken of in his time, and to gain a place in history: he, therefore, kept open the negotiations with France, designing to consent to a junction only after stipulations for extraordinary and most unequal advantages. For the recovery of Gibraltar he did not rely exclusively on a siege, Montmorin to Vergennes, 31 Aug., 1778. yet before the end of March he had collected battering cannon at Seville, and held at anchor in the bay of Cadiz a greater fleet than Spain had launched since the days of the armada. Avoiding an immediate choice between peace and war, Florida Blanca disdained the proposal of an alliance with the United States, and he demanded the postponement of active hostilities in European waters, that he might gain free scope for offering mediation. The establishments of Britain in all parts of the world were weakly garrisoned; its homeward-bound commerce was inadequatel
Bavaria (Bavaria, Germany) (search for this): chapter 7
rung from their agents at Paris all the concessions which she deemed essential to the security of her transatlantic dominions, and from France all other advantages that she could derive from the war. She excused her importunities for delay by the necessity of providing for the defence of her colonies; the danger that would hang over her homeward-bound troops and commerce; the contingency of renewed schemes of conquest on the part of the Russians against the Ottoman empire; the succession of Bavaria; the propriety of coming to a previous understanding with the Netherlands, which was harried by England, and with the king of Prussia, who was known to favor the Americans. Count Florida Blanca to Count de Aranda, 13 Jan., 1778. Communicated with other documents from the Spanish archives by Don Pascual de Gayangos. Count Montmorin, the successor of d'ossun as French ambassador at Madrid, had in his childhood been a playmate of the king of France, whose friendship he retained, so tha
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): chapter 7
explained that the independence of the United States would overturn the balance of power on the continent of America; and he proposed, through the mediation of his court, Ibid., 19 April, 1778. to obtain a cessation of hostilities in order to establish and perpetuate an equilibrium. The offer of mediation was an offer of the influence of the Bourbon family to secure to England the basin of the St. Lawrence, with the territory north-west of the Ohio, and to bound the United States by the Alleghanies. But Lord Weymouth held it ignoble to purchase from the wreckers of British colonial power the part that they might be willing to restore; and he answered, that while France supported the colonies in rebellion no negotiation could be entered into. Weymouth to Grantham, 20 May, 1778. But, as both Great Britain and Spain were interested in preserving colonial dependency, he invited a closer union between them, and even proposed an alliance. At this point in the negotiation, Florida
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