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Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
, 1861, and remained until May, 1863. He was born in Norwich, Conn., in 1832. Mr. Strong writes: The larger part of my early life before entering Kenyon College, Ohio, in 1847, was spent in Cincinnati. The three years of my theological training in the Alexandria Seminary, Virginia, in the same class with my friend Phillips Brooks, closed in 1859, and I was ordained in the early summer of that year. For less than two years after leaving the seminary, I was assistant to Bishop Lee of Delaware, and the Medford parish was my first full charge. Mr. George Porter and his sister, with the family connections of Mrs. Dudley Hall, children and grandchildren, were the more prominent members of the parish and my constant supporters. The young ladies of the church, Miss Nellie Wilde, Miss Caroline Train, Miss Mary King, and others, gave me patient and ready help in the Sunday-school under Mr. Gardiner P. Gates, our efficient superintendent. Those were the early years of the war, anxi
Germantown, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
from his first Philadelphia parish for a vacation visit in Boston, sat in a pew in our church on one of the Sundays, and privately criticized the sermon as bloodthirsty. The Episcopal, or, as it is sometimes called, the English Church, was at that period rather conservative in its pulpit utterances relating to the leading questions of the day, but Mr. Strong seems to have been a courageous radical. After leaving Medford in 1863, officiated two and one-half years in Calvary Church, Germantown, Penn.; twelve years as professor of English literature in Kenyon College; ten years as rector of Grace Church, New Bedford, and ten more as a resident of Cambridge, where my home now is. Mr. Strong was succeeded by the Rev. Charles Henry Learoyd, who entered upon his duties September 6, 1863. Mr. Learoyd was born in Danvers. He entered Harvard College in 1854; was a member of the Institute Society, the Hasty Pudding Club and the Phi Beta Kappa; formed the Harvard Glee Club, and was it
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ucceeded in July by the Rev. Arthur Bannard Moorehouse, A. M. Mr. Moorehouse was born in Schenectady, N. Y. He graduated from Union College in 1878, receiving the degree of A. B., and in 1881 received the degree of A. M. in course. In 1880 he entered the General Theological Seminary, N. Y., and was graduated in the class of 1883. In May of that year he was made deacon by the Right Rev. W. C. Doane, D. D., bishop of Albany, and spent his diaconate as assistant in St. John's Church, Washington, D. C., ordained priest in 1884, and was assistant in St. Paul's Church, Troy, N. Y. Became rector of Zion's Church, Sandy Hill, in 1885; in 1889, rector of St. Luke's, Chelsea, and in 1890, of Grace Church, Medford. Mr. Moorehouse resigned the rectorship on account of ill health on the first of September, 1897. From that time until April 20, 1898, the parish was without a rector, but on that date, the Rev. Frank Ilsley Paradise, for four years dean of Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans
St. Peter's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
Cathedral, New Orleans, accepted the call and at once entered upon his new duties. Mr. Paradise was born in Boston and educated in the public schools and at Phillips Academy, Andover. He was graduated from Yale University in the class of 1888, and was prepared for the ministry at the Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn., the school which was founded and presided over by Bishop Williams. Upon his ordination to the diaconate in 1890, Mr. Paradise was called to the rectorship of St. Peter's Church, Milford, Conn., where he remained three years, when he was called to St. Luke's Church, East Greenwich, R. I. After a short rectorship of seven months in this beautiful town, he was elected dean of Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans, La., and began his work there in February, 1894. He filled this position for the next four years, and in April, 1898, was called to the rectorship of Grace Church, Medford. The fiftieth anniversary of Grace Church was suitably observed on Sunday, M
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ish village church. The rector, the Rev. David Greene Haskins, was born in Boston, May 1, 1818. He was graduated from Harvard University in the class of 1837, and in 1839 entered the junior class of the theological seminary, Andover. From 1841 to 1844 he was preceptor of the Portland Academy at Portland, Maine. Removing to Roxbury in 1844, he conducted a private school for girls, and at the same time studied for the ministry under the direction of Rev. Dr. Howe, late bishop of central Pennsylvania. On March 7, 1848, he was elected rector of Grace Church. In his early residence in Medford he occupied the old Remember Preston house in the square, opposite the town hall. In 1851 he built the house at the corner of High and Mystic streets in West Medford, afterwards occupied by the late Nathan Bridge. This house was building at the time of the tornado; was entirely demolished, and had to be rebuilt. Mr. Haskins resigned the rectorship February 18, 1852. At that time
Trinity Church (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
is, however, was not willing thus to suffer deprivation of his religious liberty, and was granted an appeal from the judgments of the local courts by the King in council. What the final results of this case was, doth not appear, but it is probable that the custom of taxing those who were members of the Established Church of England did not long continue. But members of that Church, if they still desired to engage in its worship, were obliged to do so in the old parishes of Christ and Trinity Churches, Boston, or the somewhat nearer parish of Christ Church, Cambridge. This state of things continued until the year 1847. In November of that year the project of an Episcopal church in Medford was first agitated; and at a meeting held on December 11 it was determined to make an effort to establish a parish. Christmas Eve was selected as an appropriate time for the first service, and the Rev. Dr. Alexander H. Vinton, rector of St. Paul's Church, Boston, was invited to preach on the oc
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
e names of the bishops of the diocese, the rector of the parish, the officers, building committee and architect. The church was erected under the supervision of John T. Tarbell, Francis A. Gray, Dudley C. Hall, Shepherd Brooks and the rector as a building committee. The parish took possession of the new stone church on Advent Sunday, 1868. Mr. Learoyd resigned his rectorship at Easter, 1872, and became rector of St. Thomas Church, Taunton. He was elected treasurer of the diocese of Massachusetts in 1873, which office he now (1901) holds. He resigned from St. Thomas Parish in July, 1895, and accepted the rectorship of Emmanuel Church, Wakefield, January 15, 1896. On the fifteenth of September, 1872, the Rev. Charles Lewis Hutchins entered upon the rectorship of the parish. Mr. Hutchins was born in Corcord, New Hampshire, in 1838, of George and Sarah Rolfe Tucker Hutchins. His great-grandfather, Gordon Hutchins, fought as a captain with the Continental troops at Bunker Hill,
St. Luke's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
aradise was born in Boston and educated in the public schools and at Phillips Academy, Andover. He was graduated from Yale University in the class of 1888, and was prepared for the ministry at the Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn., the school which was founded and presided over by Bishop Williams. Upon his ordination to the diaconate in 1890, Mr. Paradise was called to the rectorship of St. Peter's Church, Milford, Conn., where he remained three years, when he was called to St. Luke's Church, East Greenwich, R. I. After a short rectorship of seven months in this beautiful town, he was elected dean of Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans, La., and began his work there in February, 1894. He filled this position for the next four years, and in April, 1898, was called to the rectorship of Grace Church, Medford. The fiftieth anniversary of Grace Church was suitably observed on Sunday, May 7, 1898. The historical address was delivered by the new rector and was exceedingly
St. Paul's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 3
rd was first agitated; and at a meeting held on December 11 it was determined to make an effort to establish a parish. Christmas Eve was selected as an appropriate time for the first service, and the Rev. Dr. Alexander H. Vinton, rector of St. Paul's Church, Boston, was invited to preach on the occasion. One of the Congregational churches was loaned for the service, and, in accordance with the custom of the Episcopal communion on the Christmas festival, was fitly decorated with evergreen. Thn the class of 1883. In May of that year he was made deacon by the Right Rev. W. C. Doane, D. D., bishop of Albany, and spent his diaconate as assistant in St. John's Church, Washington, D. C., ordained priest in 1884, and was assistant in St. Paul's Church, Troy, N. Y. Became rector of Zion's Church, Sandy Hill, in 1885; in 1889, rector of St. Luke's, Chelsea, and in 1890, of Grace Church, Medford. Mr. Moorehouse resigned the rectorship on account of ill health on the first of September, 189
Trinity (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
ius & Sons, Philadelphia, and exhibited by them at the Centennial Exposition. The hanging of the altar, the dorsal, and antepen-dium for pulpit consist of drapery, with emblems in raised needlework. There are four sets of these embroideries beautifully wrought in as many colors. White, used in Easter, Ascension and Epiphany seasons, symbolizes the sun-bright light of truth, innocence, joy, etc. Red, used at Whitsunday and Saints' days, stands for ardent love and for fire. Green, used at Trinity season, is symbol of life, from living vegetation. Violet, used in Advent and Lent, is symbol of sorrow or union of love and pain. The west door of the church opens directly into the nave. Above it is a circular or rose window nine feet in diameter, glorious with stained glass, the gift of the Sunday-school. The pews, thirty-seven in number, are open seats of quartered oak; the total seating capacity being about three hundred. Within a few months Pew No. 29 has been set apart for
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