hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Pierpont 34 4 Browse Search
John Albree 23 1 Browse Search
January 30th, 1791 AD 22 22 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 21 1 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
James Pierpont 18 2 Browse Search
John Dame 18 0 Browse Search
James M. G. Plummer 15 7 Browse Search
Cook 14 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6.. Search the whole document.

Found 476 total hits in 244 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
mas R. Peck & Co. had, on Mystic avenue, a factory for making fur (commonly called beaver) hats, of which the product some years had been about ten thousand, valued at about $40,000. But soon after the time of which we write, that department of industry was entirely ruined by the growing popularity and sale of the silk variety which, having been then a few years upon the market, obtained and held undisputed sway till a new style, with low crowns, was set by Kossuth on his visit to the United States in December, 1851. In 1837 George L. and Henry L. Stearns commenced, on Union street, the manufacture of linseed oil from seed purchased in Calcutta. In one year they made 13,500 gallons from 7,300 bushels of seed. January 30, 1849, Loss, $12,000; insurance, $8,000. Boston Post, February 1, 1849. their factory was burned and never rebuilt. Its tall chimney was afterwards moved intact across the branch canal to the shipyard of J. O. Curtis, where it now stands, minus a few of its
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
d Simon Bradstreet of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and also from Gov. Wiggin of New Hampshire. In 1846, when he was eight years old, his parents removed to Lowell, Mass., and here, on the banks of the Merrimack, for which he always had a great and sentimental affection he grew to manhood. He was familiar with the picturesque b of his junior year his first sermon was preached in the village of East Lexington, and thereafter he continued to do supply work, preaching in his home church in Lowell, in Weston, Shirley and Essex. In order to provide the means for his college expenses, he, for several years, had taught the winter term of school, as so manyaught with much success till the summer of 1862, when he had made choice of the law as his future profession. He accordingly resigned and entered a law office in Lowell. The gloomy days of 1862, caused by the various disasters to the Union forces during the latter part of the year, produced their effect upon him. The blood of
Little Escambia Creek (United States) (search for this): chapter 2
y, thence to Barrancas, Fla. Here they joined the Second Division, Thirteenth Army Corps, under Major-General C. C. Andrews, and on March 11, proceeded to Pensacola. Although the forts commanding Mobile Bay had been reduced by Admiral Farragut the preceding August, the city of Mobile still held out, and the movements in this section were directed to that end. From Pensacola the route was northward along the Escambia river. On March 25, the Fifteenth Battery was engaged in the battle of Escambia Creek. Thence the route lay through the pine barrens, till Blakely was reached. The siege of this place was begun on the second day of April, and the battery then received an experience of vigorous fighting for which they had longed ever since they had come south. The works were carried by assault on April 9, the same day that Lee surrendered at Appomattox, and on the eleventh, with the news of this surrender came also the news that the enemy were evacuating the city of Mobile. They were
Madisonville (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
uiting office in the city and remained at this post till October 21. He had been promoted to the rank of first lieutenant September 27. Toward the end of the year he was at Lakeport, La., and on January 2, 1864, accompanied an expedition to Madisonville, on the north side of Lake Pontchartrain. Throughout the year his company was engaged in helping hold the territory on both sides of the Mississippi that had been acquired with so much difficulty previous to the fall of Vicksburg. After the expedition to Madisonville they again returned to New Orleans for guard duty. During this interval the monotony of garrison life was cheered by a visit of several months from his wife, whom he had left the year before, a bride of a week. On October 17, they embarked for the mouth of the White river in Arkansas. An expedition up this river was made one hundred ninety miles to Devall's Bluff, which occupied the time till the end of November, when they returned and encamped in the suburbs of Mem
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
left a sting behind. Lorin Low Dame, the only child of Samuel and Mary Ann (Gilman) Dame, was born in Newmarket, N. H., March 12, 1838. He was a direct descendant in the ninth generation from John Dame, one of the first and substantial settlers of Dover, N. H., the line being Samuel8, John7, Samuel6, Moses5, John4, John3, John2, John1. Through his mother, he was descended from Governors Thomas Dudley and Simon Bradstreet of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and also from Gov. Wiggin of New Hampshire. In 1846, when he was eight years old, his parents removed to Lowell, Mass., and here, on the banks of the Merrimack, for which he always had a great and sentimental affection he grew to manhood. He was familiar with the picturesque beauty of this magnificent river for miles, and was fond of returning there with his family and friends, that they, too, might enjoy with him these charming spots. It is a great pleasure to recall the pleasant rambles we had together along the banks of
Devall's Bluff (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
of the Mississippi that had been acquired with so much difficulty previous to the fall of Vicksburg. After the expedition to Madisonville they again returned to New Orleans for guard duty. During this interval the monotony of garrison life was cheered by a visit of several months from his wife, whom he had left the year before, a bride of a week. On October 17, they embarked for the mouth of the White river in Arkansas. An expedition up this river was made one hundred ninety miles to Devall's Bluff, which occupied the time till the end of November, when they returned and encamped in the suburbs of Memphis, Tenn. Early in January, 1865, they returned to Louisiana and took up their position at Kennerville, some miles above New Orleans. Changes of camp are the only matters of activity recorded in the journals till February 20, when the battery embarked on Lake Pontchartrain and sailed for Mobile Bay, thence to Barrancas, Fla. Here they joined the Second Division, Thirteenth Army Corp
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ns for guard duty. During this interval the monotony of garrison life was cheered by a visit of several months from his wife, whom he had left the year before, a bride of a week. On October 17, they embarked for the mouth of the White river in Arkansas. An expedition up this river was made one hundred ninety miles to Devall's Bluff, which occupied the time till the end of November, when they returned and encamped in the suburbs of Memphis, Tenn. Early in January, 1865, they returned to Louisiuished literary gentleman. Mr. Dame had always been a careful observer of trees; he may be said to have been a lover of them. In his notes, taken when on the march through the swamps of Louisiana, on his trips up and down the White river in Arkansas, and along the Mississippi, in the pine barrens of Florida, and in the higher regions of Alabama, are frequent comments on the trees. In the preface to his Typical Elms and Other Trees of Massachusetts, he says: The call of the Autocrat, in
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
y State Monthly, besides several of the daily papers. Of especial interest are his articles in the Bay State Monthly on The Washington Elm and the Eliot Oak, February, 1884, as foreshadowing the greater work-Typical Elms and Other Trees of Massachusetts, which came several years later. In November, 1884, he contributed to the Bay State Monthly a carefully prepared paper on the Middlesex Canal. This same was later revised and appeared in its new form in the Medford Historical Register in 18 on his trips up and down the White river in Arkansas, and along the Mississippi, in the pine barrens of Florida, and in the higher regions of Alabama, are frequent comments on the trees. In the preface to his Typical Elms and Other Trees of Massachusetts, he says: The call of the Autocrat, in the August number of the Atlantic, 1858 . . . expressed so general a desire that it is a wonder the work has not been previously undertaken. From that date, the historian of this volume has looked o
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
cklebank, hastened to the defence of the New England homes against the Indians in King Philip's war, and met his death in the famous Sudbury fight; another, Chaplain Moses Coffin of Newbury, the drum ecclesiastic, whose life was saved from a French bullet by the Bible in his pocket, did valiant service for his country at the taking of Louisburg. Mr. Dame could not resist his country's call in her deepest need. His Lowell home had been broken up by the removal of his father and mother to California some time before, and there was nothing to hold him back. He enlisted February 9, 1863; was commissioned second lieutenant and served as recruiting officer at Fort Warren, where he was instrumental in organizing the Fifteenth Massachusetts Light Battery. Although engaged in these warlike preparations, and hastening forward with all speed possible the time of departure for the seat of active war, he yet found time for the gentler arts of peace and the subtle claims of love, and on March
Braintree (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
for the gentler arts of peace and the subtle claims of love, and on March 1, 1863, he married Nancy Isabel, daughter of John Bass and Nancy B. (Thayer) Arnold of Braintree, who had been one of his pupils in the high school at Braintree. The Fifteenth Battery was soon ordered south, and with them he sailed from Boston for New OrlBraintree. The Fifteenth Battery was soon ordered south, and with them he sailed from Boston for New Orleans, March 9, on the ship Zouave, arriving April 9. On the third of June they were sent to garrison two forts commanding the approaches to New Orleans by land; one on a marshy island, formed by Bayou St. John, commanding the bayou road to Lake Pontchartrain, and the other at Gentilly, on the New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain Raiunsettling influence of army life rendered this a difficult decision, and before he finally settled down, he tried various lines of activity. Making his home at Braintree, he engaged in literary work, reporting for the daily papers, writing sketches, stories and essays. At the same time he was reading law. He also engaged in the
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...