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Chelsea (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
by Rev. (now Dr.) Henry C. Graves, then of Fall River; the charge to the church by Dr. Lorimer, then pastor of Tremont Temple, and prayer by Dr. Sawtelle, then of Chelsea. There was also a hymn, written for the occasion by one of the members of the church. Rev. Mr. Abbott's pastorate, so gracefully begun, continued with great sho seized their children and hurried with them into the street in their night clothes. One poor child was burned to death. When the West Cambridge, Malden and Chelsea engines arrived, the bridge spanning the Mystic river was on fire, and they were taken across in scows. The bridge was finally saved by hard labor. The precisad. The fire departments deserve great credit for their promptness in rallying to the conflagration. Engine No. 10 from Boston, together with the Charlestown, Chelsea, Malden, Reading, Woburn and Cambridge Cos., were on hand, and signalized themselves by their labors to stay the flames. One out of town fireman had his foot c
Wellington (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
taff,—my little staff of twelve—I passed over this Jordan,— the Jordan of trial and obscurity — in 1841, and now I am become four bands. The days of hand engines. By Mr. Charles Cummings. The steam fire engine did not come to Medford till 1861. In 1847 the town owned four hand engines and one hook and ladder carriage with its appropriate apparatus. These were all located near the centre, as the outskirts had but few buildings to be protected. There was one dwelling house only at Wellington, one south of what is now the Mystic House, and a few at the West End. The house of Engine No. 1 (the Governor Brooks) was on Union street, and is now a dwelling house on Summer street. No. 2 (the Gen. Jackson) was kept in the west end of the brick schoolhouse in the rear of the First Parish Church, till a new home was made for it in what is now Grand Army Hall. No. 3 (the J. Q. Adams) was stored in the brick building on Riverside avenue, which is now owned by the Boston & Maine Railro
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
completion of the reservoir at the head of Brooks park in 1853. A fire was first set in the stable at the Royall House, and when that was nearly consumed, another was started in a barn on the south corner of Main street and Stearns avenue. Saturday night was chosen for the sport, which did not end till well into Sunday morning. The most disastrous fire the town ever suffered occurred November 2, 1850, when the buildings, thirty-six in all, on both sides of Main street, from the bridge to South street, were consumed. Fifteen engines came from other towns to supplement the Medford department. From the Daily Chronotype, Friday, November 22, 1850. Elizur Wright, editor and proprietor. Great fire in Medford! Twenty-five buildings burned! forty families turned out of doors! $100,000 worth of property destroyed! Life lost! A Destructive fire broke out about half past 9 last evening, in Medford, which threatened at one time to lay the town in ashes. The wind was blowing ver
Quiquechan River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ardent, hopeful, kind of heart, and fervent of spirit, he won his way, beloved of all. His ordination and installation took place in the lecture-room of the church, December 19, 1877. The sermon was preached by Rev. Geo. B. Gow, of Millbury, Mr. Abbott's first Baptist pastor; the ordination prayer was by Rev. Dr. Hovey, president of Newton; the right hand of fellowship was given by Rev. S. W. Foljambe, then of Maiden; the charge to the candidate by Rev. (now Dr.) Henry C. Graves, then of Fall River; the charge to the church by Dr. Lorimer, then pastor of Tremont Temple, and prayer by Dr. Sawtelle, then of Chelsea. There was also a hymn, written for the occasion by one of the members of the church. Rev. Mr. Abbott's pastorate, so gracefully begun, continued with great success. The church increased in numbers, and on July 10, 1878, the completed church edifice was dedicated to the worship of God, amid general rejoicing. The sermon was preached by Rev. Dr. Bosworth, the first past
Millbury (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
in May, 1877, and was succeeded, in December of the same year, by James Percival Abbott, now Rev. Dr. Abbott of Oshkosh, Wis. Rev. Mr. Abbott brought to his new field the vigor of a fresh enthusiam. Just graduated from Newton Theological Institution, young, ardent, hopeful, kind of heart, and fervent of spirit, he won his way, beloved of all. His ordination and installation took place in the lecture-room of the church, December 19, 1877. The sermon was preached by Rev. Geo. B. Gow, of Millbury, Mr. Abbott's first Baptist pastor; the ordination prayer was by Rev. Dr. Hovey, president of Newton; the right hand of fellowship was given by Rev. S. W. Foljambe, then of Maiden; the charge to the candidate by Rev. (now Dr.) Henry C. Graves, then of Fall River; the charge to the church by Dr. Lorimer, then pastor of Tremont Temple, and prayer by Dr. Sawtelle, then of Chelsea. There was also a hymn, written for the occasion by one of the members of the church. Rev. Mr. Abbott's pastora
Marshfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
n this way. In 1840, the church organizations existing in Medford were the First Congregational, now known as the Unitarian Church, the Second Congregational, or First Trinitarian Congregational, and the Methodist Episcopal Church. In the last-named, however, services had been discontinued—resumed in 1842. Among the little band, still holding their weekly gatherings at the home on High street, in 1840, was Moses Parsons, a man then of advanced age, a member of the Baptist Church in Marshfield, who, with others, was impressed with the need of further church privileges. Encouraged by the sympathy of friends, he obtained the use of the Town Hall for public worship, at his own expense, and secured the services of Rev. Lucius M. Bolles, then corresponding secretary of the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions. Rev. Mr. Bolles preached his first sermon under these auspices to an appreciative audience, August 16, 1840. Public worship was continued in the Town Hall with increased inte
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
Mystic Church, and many others, added words of cheer. In the evening further services followed, and the two days celebration—red-letter days in the history of the First Baptist Church of Medford—was brought to a close. In 1893, the church after due consideration, arrived at the conclusion that its business should be managed, and its interests attended to, by its own members, as any other business interests would be, and accordingly took measures for incorporation under the laws of Massachusetts. This was speedily accomplished, the society became a thing of the past, and the First Baptist Church of Medford (incorporated) went on with its work. In 1895 a great sorrow came to the church in the death of Mrs. Ellen Wheelock Abbott, the pastor's wife, a woman of sweet and gentle spirit, of whom it might truly be said:— None knew her but to love her, None named her but to praise. In June, 1896, a Baptist Church was formed at West Medford, to which the First Baptist Church<
New Brunswick (Canada) (search for this): chapter 4
oratio N. Peak, Jr., Edward F. Crockett, George Thompson, and Danforth Tyler Newcomb. The last-named, who was a member of the church and a young man of much promise, gave up his life at the battle of White Hall, N. C., December 18, 1862. Rev. Mr. Preston's ten years of loving ministrations, patient service and generous self-sacrifice are still remembered, and today he is the dearly loved and highly honored resident ex-pastor of the flock. In November, 1868, the Rev. J. C. Hurd of New Brunswick, came to the church. He was a brilliant orator and a highly-esteemed preacher. He resigned in May, 1870. The church was without a pastor until the next May, when in 1871, the Rev. J. G. Richardson of Providence, R. I., succeeded. He was a man of wisdom and marked ability, who, with patience, energy, and enthusiasm led the way to the erection of a new house of worship. A lot was purchased on Oakland street, plans were made, and the work of building was commenced. The architect and b
Oshkosh (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
used for thirty-one years, was sold. Rev. Mr. Richardson after six years of faithful and unremitting toil, resigned his charge in May, 1877, and was succeeded, in December of the same year, by James Percival Abbott, now Rev. Dr. Abbott of Oshkosh, Wis. Rev. Mr. Abbott brought to his new field the vigor of a fresh enthusiam. Just graduated from Newton Theological Institution, young, ardent, hopeful, kind of heart, and fervent of spirit, he won his way, beloved of all. His ordination and d faithfully served for twenty years were severed. Rev. Mr. Abbott, after the farewell reception tendered him by the church, made a tour to the Holy Land, and on his return accepted a call to the large and flourishing First Baptist Church in Oshkosh, Wis. In September, 1898, the Rev. M. F. Johnson, an independent thinker, a keen and logical reasoner, a man of tender and earnest feeling, assumed the duties of the position, which he retained for two years, resigning in October, 1900, to take
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
ed for the greater part of her ninety sweet and gentle years in the home where she is receiving loving compensation for the affection and care she had given nephews and nieces, in the Tucker homestead, Pleasant street court; and Mr. Francis A. Lander, also coming into the church by baptism the same year, whose home is in Cambridge-port, and who, despite his four score years, makes happy pilgrimages to his old church home. Officers and Committees, First Baptist Church (incorporated), Medford, Mass. 1902-1903. Pastor, Rev. Maurice A. Levy. Moderator, Calvin H. Clark. Clerk, William H. Cummings. Assistant Clerk, Mrs. J. M. G. Plummer. Treasurer, Walter F. Cushing. Assistant Treasurer, J. J. Parry. Collector, Warren S. McIntire. Deacons, Dana I. McIntire, Calvin H. Clark, J. M. G. Plummer, Gilbert Hodges. Standing Committee, Gilbert Hodges, Dana I. McIntire, Ira W. Hamlin, Geo. E. Holbrook, Walter F. Cushing. Prudential Committee, Pastor and Deacons, J. J. Parry
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