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Mystic River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
lained bitterly of their treatment of him, saying that the cusses had stolen his invention. Not despairing, however, he invented a new form of engine, for which he secured a patent. This was acquired by Sullivan, after his experience with a heavy engine from Philadelphia, which he wrote had a damaging effect upon the boats used upon the canal. Full of hope, Mr. Sullivan purchased the shops and water privilege at Medford, now within the bounds of Winchester. These were located on the Aberjona river opposite the present Parkway and just below the present Wedgemere station. He then entered upon the manufacture of steam engines, to use upon the canal and the Merrimack river. The writer finds no evidence of the construction of but one steam-boat; but of that has seen the receipted bill of one of the employees for his services, 1 day to Medford with steamboat $1.50, this on August 11, 1818. In addition to this, it has been his privilege to converse with an aged lady, whose father's
Cape Ann (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
to the mill. It was of much later date than the three roads described as leading .... from the town pump. Porter's corner was so called from the residence and store on the corner of Main street, then owned and occupied by Jonathan Porter. This store was well known for miles around, and our elders tell of the line of teams, extending up High street and down Salem street for several rods, with steaming oxen waiting for their turn to be relieved of the loads brought from up above, and down Cape Ann way, to be exchanged for West India goods (pronounced West Ingie) from the store. Ship street ended at the red gate, which was the entrance to Wellington Farms, which were owned and tilled by the brothers Isaac and James Wellington, their fertile acres unbroken by street or railroad. South street, after being extended to Medford Hillside, is now back within its original limits, from Main street, at the hotel, to where the road leaves the river. Spring street, crossing the canal, is Winth
Pawtucket (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
for the same. During the earliest years the canal was being constructed, a canal was built around Pawtucket Falls at Chelmsford, and for twenty-five years was used for the purpose of navigation. Then some capitalists were induced to buy the same and utilize the power of the Merrimack it furnished; the result was the town, and soon the city, of Lowell. In 1831 Mr. Eddy was directed to survey a route for a branch canal from Billerica to the Hamilton Mills in Lowell, to save four miles and Pawtucket tolls. He reported the project feasible, but counselled delay. The reason is not hard to discover in the following letter to the corporation. November 10, 1831. gentlemen:—I am now laying out the route of the R. R. from Boston to Lowell. We must cross your canal once, and in some places pass so near as to take some of your land. Will you have the goodness to appoint some person or persons to make such arrangements as will be most advantageous to all parties. I am, gentlemen, v
Nashua (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
still remains in excellent condition), entertained handsomely at a jubilee, held in honor of the event. Ten years had elapsed since Judge Sullivan had broached the design of the canal to Col. Baldwin, then the sheriff of the county, and the Middlesex Canal was completed and ready for business, the first of its kind in America, the great enterprise of the time, but to Sullivan's scheme the Merrimack River was expected to contribute. It is well to remember just here, that Lowell, Lawrence, Nashua and Manchester were then places still to be, and that passage up the Merrimack was interrupted by the falls of Wicassee, Bow, Isle Hooksett, and Amoskeag. A company, called the Merrimack Boating Co., was formed, closely allied to the Proprietors of Middlesex Canal, to work the river, while canals and locks were constructed around the various falls, notably Blodgett's Canal at Amoskeag. Allusion has been made to the breaking ground with ceremony. In the construction of these locks and cana
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
.,June, 1770Oct. 8, 1770   (wife)   JosephChildren   William History told by names of streets. At an adjourned meeting of the Town of Medford, held May 4, 1829, the following report was read:— The Selectmen being appointed a Committee at April meeting for the purpose of naming the Streets report the following—that the road leading from the Town pump west to Charlestown line be called High St. from the Town pump east to Malden line, Salem St. from Town pump South to foot of Winter hill, Main St—from Hotel west to where the road leaves the river, South St & and from there over the Canal to Charlestown line, Spring St. from Main St. to Charlestown line on the road to Lechmere point Court Street from Main St. near Nathan Adams' house to Charlestown line leading to Harvard College, Cambridge St. from Benjamin Tufts corner to Stoneham line Mountain St. from Ship St. to Salem St. by the new burying ground—Cross St. from Furness Corner to Woburn line, Purchase St—
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
lder. At North Billerica one guard lock remains with its gates, and conveys the water to the wheel-pits of the Talbot mills, while a little below is the ruin of the lock into the lower river, with a fragment of the gate still in the water. At Middlesex village, where the entrance was had into the Merrimack, is the Hadley Pasture, once the scene of activity, as the boats went up and down the three steps of the fine stone locks. All these are gone, but the little office of the collector still South street, after being extended to Medford Hillside, is now back within its original limits, from Main street, at the hotel, to where the road leaves the river. Spring street, crossing the canal, is Winthrop street. Summer street (formerly Middlesex) and West street approximately mark the course of Middlesex canal in this section. Nathan Adams occupied a house where the Mystic House stands, and Harvard street was Cambridge street. Both names are equally appropriate. Mountain street was
Tyngsborough (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ithin the bounds of Medford. The tavern at Landing No. 4 was enlarged to double its original size, a new lock was built, and the aqueduct across the river into what was then Charlestown, but now Somerville, was, with the exception of the abutments of boulders, entirely renewed. In other places such renewal suspended business for some weeks. Mr. Eddy's executive ability is seen in the fact that he had the material all upon the site before the season closed, the granite being boated from Tyngsborough, and the framing done at Billerica in 1827. Eight days sufficed to remove the timbers of the lock and aqueduct with the piling that supported the latter. All the iron was saved, and the wood sawed into four foot lengths, piled in lots, and sold at auction. The old abutments of great boulders needed no repair. The wooden piling was replaced by three pieces of split granite, and the season being favorable, the work had progressed so rapidly that these neared completion in January. Th
Newburyport (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
cted from his bill a shilling each for meals had at the taverns. Others received from $17 to $21 per month and board. In the bills of such against the company appear charges of twelve and one-half cents per week for washing, and for rations at five cents per day. What these rations were (which one man charged as allowance) may be readily conjectured, and the fact the bills were approved and paid, throws some light on the custom of the time. Tolls on merchandise down the Merrimack to Newburyport had to be prepaid, while those through the canal could be paid at the office in Charlestown, the goods being security for the same. During the earliest years the canal was being constructed, a canal was built around Pawtucket Falls at Chelmsford, and for twenty-five years was used for the purpose of navigation. Then some capitalists were induced to buy the same and utilize the power of the Merrimack it furnished; the result was the town, and soon the city, of Lowell. In 1831 Mr. Eddy w
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Middlesex Canal seems small and insignificant. But viewed in the true light of comparison with the then existing appliances and means, it will be readily seen to rank equally with them, if not greater in magnitude and importance. It accomplished in a way its mission, and bore no small part in the progress of the time, this owing to the energy and perseverance of Massachusetts and New Hampshire men, and was out-stripped in public service only by the power of steam, also in the hands of New England men. This question is often asked, what will, or will not the present century develop? Possibly the men of today, could they return at its close, might see as much to surprise them as Gov. Sullivan, his son, or Col. Baldwin would, if they could be transported in a canal boat some evening into Charlestown at Sullivan square. Town Records, Vol. 1, Page 1. Upon the 14 of [ ]At a generall meeting of [ ] Selectmen & Jnhabitants of meadford it was then agreed by them for the procuring
Maple Meadow Brook (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
y a wooden aqueduct one hundred and thirtyseven feet long, elevated thirty feet above its current. While the aqueducts were costly, yet the long stretches of meadow land the canal had to cross were extremely treacherous and swallowed up a vast amount of filling ere the course of the canal was secure. In some intervals they had to be filled upwards of one hundred feet in width to a depth of ten feet to form the canal bed before the embankments were made. This difficulty overcome and Maple Meadow Brook (the source of Ipswich River) crossed, a loop, called the Ox-bow, had to be made around a hill. Much of the work was through a sandy soil, but in various places its course could not avoid ledges of solid rock. These taxed the effort and patience of the laborers, who were mostly native born, as emigration from Ireland, Italy and Hungary was then but slight. The shore of Medford Pond, or, as it is now termed, Mystic Lake, was originally intended for the southern terminus, but the ca
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