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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7.. Search the whole document.

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Chelsea (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
n   Nathaniel Hastings, AnnaLexington, July, 1765Feb. 24, 1766 Hatch, SarahWalpole, Sept. 23, 1765Sept. 1766In service to Col. Royall. Hayden Tavern Keeper. See Taylor.Tenant of Col. Royall. Haynes, DorcasMar. court, 1767 Haynes, HannahChelsea, May 20, 1763Feb. 12, 1764Age 10. In family of Samuel Jenks. Haynes, Hains. Mrs. HannahBoston, Oct. or Nov., 1766May 16, 1767 Hays, ElizabethWilmington, June 29, 1759May 5, 1760Single woman. In family of Z. Poole. Hawley, NoahJan. 30,letion of his studies, in 1863, he joined a Methodist Conference in northern New York, and filled appointments at various places in the State. He was transferred in 1882 to the New England Conference, being assigned to the Walnut Street Church, Chelsea. He identified himself with the Congregational denomination in 1886, accepting a call to the Maverick Church, East Boston. In 1893 he went to the Piedmont Church, Worcester, remaining there four years. He had been acting pastor of the Mystic C
Trinity (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
pas-de-deux and minuet, from old Doctor Shaffer, who was at the time second violin of the Boston Theatre, as well as authority in the correct methods of bowing and curtesying. In a letter dated December 10, 19—, he alludes to a copy of Charlotte Temple, which he had recently found in a bookstall in New York. He says: the story had long been a familiar one, and I in common with others of many times my age and judgment, had lingered before the slab that bears her name in the graveyard of old Trinity, and sometimes laid a flower on it for sympathy's sake, as I have done many times since. On my return home, I showed the little book to my mother, and as she held it in her hands and read a word here and there, she, too, began to journey backward to her school days, and asked my father to bring out her treasure chest, and from it she took her school relics—a tattered ribbon watch-guard fastened by a flat gold buckle that Mrs. Rowson had given her as a reward for good conduct, and a package
Lunenburg, Ma. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
e Thompson, born June 24, 1784, was the daughter of Ebenezer and Katherine Thompson; married November 15, 1808, to Noah Johnson of Woburn. Fanny Tufts, born January 14, 1789, was the daughter of James, Jr., and Elizabeth Tufts. Sarah Lloyd Wait, born November 29, 1785, was the daughter of Nathan Wait; she married, October 19, 1806, Thomas Symmes; afterwards, November 13, 1821, John Howe, and lived where the Centre Grammar School now stands. She has one son living, Mr. George Howe of Lunenburg. Harriet Wait, her sister, born December 19, 1788; died August 19, 1813. Of Mary Warner, I find nothing definite, excepting that in Mrs. Rowson's memoirs she is said to be a teacher in the Taunton Academy. There is also a long letter of recommendation from her teacher to the Rev. Simeon Doggett, who was then preceptor of the academy at Taunton. In a letter to Hannah Swan, Mrs. Rowson refers to Mrs. Gilchrist of Medford. I am told that Mrs. Gilchrist was Susan Wyman, daughter of
Portsmouth (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
Her life is as romantic as any creation of her gifted pen, and is a beautiful illustration of the potency of a large, glowing heart, and a determined will to rise superior to circumstance and achieve success. She was in her time famous as an actress, an author, and a teacher; and it is in this latter capacity that she is of especial interest to the people of Medford. She was the only daughter of lieutenant, afterward captain, William Haswell, of the British navy, and was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England, in 1762. Her mother's maiden name was Susanna Musgrave, and she died in giving birth to her infant daughter, whom she named with her own name and baptized with her blessing. The father was appointed to the revenue service on the American station, and sometime afterwards married a second time. He was settled pleasantly in a delightful valley at Nantasket, and desired to bring his little daughter to America to be nurtured by his excellent and pious lady under his own roof
Lovell Island (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
placing a ladder against the side of the vessel, received the passengers, conducting them safely to land. Lieutenant Haswell, not daring to risk his little daughter on the icy ladder, fastened a strong cord round her waist and swung her out over the bulwarks of the brig into the arms of a stout old sailor standing up to his waist in the water to receive her. Amid such scenes of peril Miss Susanna Haswell was introduced to our American shores. On the day succeeding the shipwreck at Lovell's Island, Lieutenant Haswell and his little daughter reached their home at Nantasket, a large one-story wooden building with a huge chimney in the centre. This house was standing in 1870, styled the Parsonage. It was in this house that Miss Haswell passed the days of her girlhood. Here her mind received its shape and coloring. Endowed by nature with a lively fancy and a vigorous constitution, she spent most of her young life in sports and rambles over the hills and valleys of Nantasket.
Taunton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
afterwards, November 13, 1821, John Howe, and lived where the Centre Grammar School now stands. She has one son living, Mr. George Howe of Lunenburg. Harriet Wait, her sister, born December 19, 1788; died August 19, 1813. Of Mary Warner, I find nothing definite, excepting that in Mrs. Rowson's memoirs she is said to be a teacher in the Taunton Academy. There is also a long letter of recommendation from her teacher to the Rev. Simeon Doggett, who was then preceptor of the academy at Taunton. In a letter to Hannah Swan, Mrs. Rowson refers to Mrs. Gilchrist of Medford. I am told that Mrs. Gilchrist was Susan Wyman, daughter of James Wyman. She was married to James Gilchrist June 10, 1805, and lived in what is called the Train house. Of Fanny Blanchard, Peggy Swan and Sallie Richardson, I have failed to find anything authoritative. In the summer of 1803, Mrs. Rowson moved her school from Medford to Newton; in 1807, to Washington street, and in 1811, to Hollis street,
Penny Brook (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
n to a date in April, when the business was completed. History told by names of streets. [Continued from Vol. VII., Page 22.] STREETS laid out within the last forty years have been very generally named for land owners who, at some time in the history of the town, held property in the neighborhood. Dexter street was named in honor of Samuel Dexter, who, when the Royall farm was broken up into smaller holdings, became the owner of land on both sides of Main street, east of Two Penny brook, so called. Nathan Tufts bought the land of Mr. Dexter, and bequeathed it to his nephews, the Tufts brothers, for whom William, Joseph and Edward streets are named. Henry and Alfred streets are named for two sons of Joseph Tufts. Tufts square, honors the family and in particular Mr. George F. Tufts of Charlestown, who gave the land for the Tufts schoolhouse. Albion street was suggested by the residence of Joseph Tufts, Albion place, Charlestown. Adams street is named for the
Billerica (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
endley, AnnJan. 30, 1791 Henshaw, SamuelCharlestown, Apr., 1754Feb. 26, 1755   Abigail (wife) Hewes, JohnLynn, Apr. 7, 1766Single man. Husbandman. Employed by Col. Royall.   ThomasAug. 31, 1797 Hill (male child)See Elias Robinson Hodge, AnnaWoburn, May, 1758Daughter of George Hodge. In service to Simon Tufts. Holden, Anne (?)Jan. 30, 1791   NathanielCharlestown, May i, 1761In family of Samuel Hall.   ThomasCharlestown, May i, 1764In family of Samuel Tufts. Hollon, Ceasar (negro)Billerica, June 1, 1765Employed by Joseph Tufts. Holmes, FrancesHolden, Aug. 23, 1754Servant in family of Jos. Skinner. Boston, July 1, 1756 A Town Meeting, 1847. Charles Cummings. WE look first at the building in which the town business was transacted. Erected in 1833, it was partially destroyed by fire in 1839. When repaired and lengthened thirteen feet, it remained without change of condition till it was again partially consumed in 1850. The lower story was occupied by two dry good
Woburn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
t is of Miss Hannah Swan, as she considerately kept her own name to the end. Miss Hannah Swan and Miss Ann Rose of London were Mrs. Rowson's assistants. The former was the daughter of Major Samuel Swan and Hannah (Frothingham) Lamson, and was born August 13, 1785. She died in Medford, August 8, 1862, aged seventy-six years, eleven months. Mr. Abijah Thompson gives the following account of Miss Swan:— My first remembrance of Miss Swan was in my youthful days, 1835-36. While in Woburn, Massachusetts, she made her home in the family of the Rev. Joseph Bennett, pastor First Congregational Church. I well remember attending a children's party with my little sister, given to the children at the parsonage. This was to introduce her preparatory to organizing an infant class. It proved a success, and Miss Swan may be considered the founder of what is today called the Infant Sabbath School in the old society, and of the younger colonies which have branched off from it. In the rear of
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
f Mary Hammon. In service to wife of Capt. James Hall. Hancock, HannahNov. 29, 1754 Hancock, SolomonCharlestown, Dec., 1729Mar. 22, 1736-7   wife and children Haraden, TimothyAnnisquam, Gloucester, Dec. 23, 1763Dec. 3, 1764In house of Wm. Hall ; came Oct. 6, 1763, to work for Hugh Floyd.   Mary (wife)   Jenne Jane. (dau.) Hardy, WilliamBoston, July 23, 1765Aug. 26, 1765In house of Richd Penhallow.   Eunice (wife) Harris, JohnBoston, Aug. 20, 1762Aug. 30, 1762 Harris, NathanielWatertown, July 10, 1761May 14, 1762In family of Israel Mead.   Anna (wife)   Jane children   Nathaniel Hastings, AnnaLexington, July, 1765Feb. 24, 1766 Hatch, SarahWalpole, Sept. 23, 1765Sept. 1766In service to Col. Royall. Hayden Tavern Keeper. See Taylor.Tenant of Col. Royall. Haynes, DorcasMar. court, 1767 Haynes, HannahChelsea, May 20, 1763Feb. 12, 1764Age 10. In family of Samuel Jenks. Haynes, Hains. Mrs. HannahBoston, Oct. or Nov., 1766May 16, 1767 Hays, ElizabethW
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