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to a pupil about to leave, who had been with her several years, in which Miss Bradbury tells the pupil that she has earned her entire approbation, and cannot be permitted to leave without being assured of her teacher's lasting affection and esteem. In point of years the South Street Seminary probably outranked every private school here for girls. Contemporary with it was Mr. John Angier's private boys' school on Forest street that had a reputation similar to that of Miss Bradbury's. On Tuesdays and Fridays there was dancing at the former, which the pupils of the Bradbury school were allowed to enjoy and take part in. Mr. Angier's school lasted from 1821 to 1841, about the time that Miss Bradbury's existed. The following from Medford were among the pupils of Miss Bradbury:— Lydia, Mary, Eliza, Nathaniel, children of Nathaniel H. Bishop. The last was there as a very young child. He was the young man who travelled over South America and made an extended canoe trip. His exp
ituted a General Court, which was to meet four times a year upon every last Wednesday in Hillary, Easter, Trinity, and Michaelmas terms, when men were made free of the company and laws made for its government. His oath as governor was administered by a Master of Chancery, Sir Charles Caesar, March 18, 1628-9, and Cradock as governor administered the oaths to the deputy-governor and assistants. The governor presided at meetings of the company previously held on March 2, 1628-9, and on the 3d, 5th, 6th, 9th, 10th, on which date the governor, with a committee to assist him, was chosen to divide the lands in New England. Meetings were held March 23 and April 30, 1629, May 11,13, on which date Mr. Cradock was chosen governor for the year following. On May 18 a court of the assistants was held, and on the 19th a committee of the governor and Messrs. White, Whetcomb, and Adams met at the house of the governor and decided on the allotment of lands. This was confirmed May 21 and on M
bout to leave, who had been with her several years, in which Miss Bradbury tells the pupil that she has earned her entire approbation, and cannot be permitted to leave without being assured of her teacher's lasting affection and esteem. In point of years the South Street Seminary probably outranked every private school here for girls. Contemporary with it was Mr. John Angier's private boys' school on Forest street that had a reputation similar to that of Miss Bradbury's. On Tuesdays and Fridays there was dancing at the former, which the pupils of the Bradbury school were allowed to enjoy and take part in. Mr. Angier's school lasted from 1821 to 1841, about the time that Miss Bradbury's existed. The following from Medford were among the pupils of Miss Bradbury:— Lydia, Mary, Eliza, Nathaniel, children of Nathaniel H. Bishop. The last was there as a very young child. He was the young man who travelled over South America and made an extended canoe trip. His experiences wer
ipal matter considered for several years after this time seems to have been the troubles of the town with the Rev. Benjamin Woodbridge, and page after page of the records is devoted to the account of the dissensions which were carried into the courts, and even to the governor and council, and which did not cease until settled by a special act of the General Court, passed in June, 1708. Mr. Woodbridge, as I have already stated, died in January, 1710, and at the town meeting held on the twenty-seventh of this month, it was voted to levy an assessment of ten pounds, on account of the amount which had been paid toward his funeral. Doubtless many of the people paid their part without a murmur, hoping that the difficulties under which they had labored, relative to the minister, for so long a time, were forever settled. A list of what each one was assessed to meet this levy is given in full in the records, in which appears names of forty-four different people. After Mr. Woodbridge's
January 6th (search for this): chapter 14
o-Japanese war. Rev. H. W. Stebbins of Boston. January 15.—Tufts College. Rev. F. W. Hamilton, D. D., Acting President. February 19.—Lemuel Cox, (1743-1806) Medford Bridge Builder and Inventor. Mr. Walter K. Watkins of Malden. March 19.—Annual Meeting. April 16.—Side Lights on the Stamp Act and the Boston Tea Party. Charles G. Chick, Esq., President Hyde Park Historical Society. May 21.—Ye Olde First Meeting House of Medford. Mr. Moses W. Mann. Supplementary course. December 2.—Japan and the Japanese-Russian war. Marshall P. Thompson, Esq., Boston. January 6.—The Metropolitan Park System. Illustrated. Mr. John Woodbury, Sec. of Commission, Boston. February 3.—Medford in 1865. Hon. Fred Gowing of Belmont. March 3.—The Election of 1860. Mr. J. H. Carfrey, Supt. of Schools, Wakefield. April 7.—The Bradbury Family. Miss Eliza M. Gill. May 5.—Charles Brooks and his work for Normal Schools. Mr. John Albree, President Swampscott
January 15th (search for this): chapter 14
Papers and addresses. 1905-6. October 16.—Vacation Experiences. Hon. William Cushing Wait. Followed by a social hour. November 20.—Major General Benjamin Lincoln and the War of the Revolution. Mr. A. P. Soule of Hingham. December 18.—Russia and the Russo-Japanese war. Rev. H. W. Stebbins of Boston. January 15.—Tufts College. Rev. F. W. Hamilton, D. D., Acting President. February 19.—Lemuel Cox, (1743-1806) Medford Bridge Builder and Inventor. Mr. Walter K. Watkins of Malden. March 19.—Annual Meeting. April 16.—Side Lights on the Stamp Act and the Boston Tea Party. Charles G. Chick, Esq., President Hyde Park Historical Society. May 21.—Ye Olde First Meeting House of Medford. Mr. Moses W. Mann. Supplementary course. December 2.—Japan and the Japanese-Russian war. Marshall P. Thompson, Esq., Boston. January 6.—The Metropolitan Park System. Illustrated. Mr. John Woodbury, Sec. of Commission, Boston. February 3.—Medford in 1865. Hon
d 3 yrs. In family of Wm. Binford. Smith, JohnWoburn, abt, Apr. 20, 1773Tenant of Samuel Brooks.        Mary (wife) Names.From. Date.Warned out.Remarks. Smith, John        Luther (children of John and Mary)        Abel (children of John and Mary)        Susanna (children of John and Mary)        Mary (children of John and Mary) Smith, SamuelCambridge, Apr. 30, 1751July 10, 1751Tenants of Samuel Brooks.        wife        Thomas (sons)        Robert (sons) Smith. SarahBoston, Feb. or Mar., 1767May Ct., 1767 Snow, UriahWoburn Prec. Burlington. Apr. 15, 1769Nov. Ct., 1769Tenant at spot Pond or Jacob Hall.        Lucy (wife)        Uriah (children)        Sarah (children)        Lucy (children)        Barnabas (children) Stanley, AbigailCharlestown, Nov. 14, 1766May 16, 1767In family of Benj. Teel. Standly, DavidCambridge, Mar. 23, 1759Nov. 21, 1759Taken in by Abner Leal
choolroom. One window in the house was always filled with flowers and plants. The father and mother were always affectionately called Pa Bradbury and Ma Bradbury. The former when digging in the garden was wont to apostrophize the worms he unearthed, much to the amusement of the little folks. Mrs. Bradbury was considered an especially lovable person, and was a source of comfort and a tower of strength at all times to those under her charge. Two of the school terms closed the last of February and of August respectively, and there were two other terms. Each year on the first of May it was the custom for the scholars to go on an excursion, spend the day on Pasture Hill, or its vicinity, and crown a May Queen. Miss Bradbury took a kindly interest in all her pupils, is pleasantly remembered by them as a dignified and most excellent teacher, and a faithful friend. I have found many who speak of her worth and the excellence of her school. One young woman's impressions were col
February 2nd (search for this): chapter 3
h was a cause of dissension for many years, and a record of the reimbursement of certain persons for powder furnished, etc. At the beginning is what was apparently the fly-leaf, on which is the record of an action in regard to procuring & main-taineing of a publique town stock of ammunition, under date of June 14, 1678. This is in the handwriting of Jonathan Wade, the first town clerk, but an entry on the other side of the leaf, of a few lines, and which is indefinite in its nature, dated February 2, 84/85, is in the handwriting of Stephen Willis, the second town clerk. Both of these were probably made on this leaf on account of their being accidentally omitted in their proper chronological order. From this reason, and from the primitive manner in which the first entries are made, the small amount recorded, (the page following what I have referred to as the fly-leaf, and which I believe to be the original first page of the volume, being sufficient to contain all that was recorded
February 3rd (search for this): chapter 14
so-Japanese war. Rev. H. W. Stebbins of Boston. January 15.—Tufts College. Rev. F. W. Hamilton, D. D., Acting President. February 19.—Lemuel Cox, (1743-1806) Medford Bridge Builder and Inventor. Mr. Walter K. Watkins of Malden. March 19.—Annual Meeting. April 16.—Side Lights on the Stamp Act and the Boston Tea Party. Charles G. Chick, Esq., President Hyde Park Historical Society. May 21.—Ye Olde First Meeting House of Medford. Mr. Moses W. Mann. Supplementary course. December 2.—Japan and the Japanese-Russian war. Marshall P. Thompson, Esq., Boston. January 6.—The Metropolitan Park System. Illustrated. Mr. John Woodbury, Sec. of Commission, Boston. February 3.—Medford in 1865. Hon. Fred Gowing of Belmont. March 3.—The Election of 1860. Mr. J. H. Carfrey, Supt. of Schools, Wakefield. April 7.—The Bradbury Family. Miss Eliza M. Gill. May 5.—Charles Brooks and his work for Normal Schools. Mr. John Albree, President Swampscott
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