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Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
g, as does any other profession. There was an appreciation of the fact that schools might be improved, and suggestions had been offered as to how to bring about the desired result. Not only in Massachusetts, but in Connecticut, New York, and Pennsylvania, were there those who were thinking, talking, and planning, but no practicable result had as yet been reached. In later years, after Massachusetts showed the way, and proved by results its effectiveness, other states followed. It has been cquired such great momentum that he was needed to guide it by explaining just what was needed. Up and down the state he went, two thousand miles in his chaise, and over into New Hampshire and Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York and Pennsylvania, ever ringing the changes on his maxim: As is the teacher, so is the school, stating the facts about what the system had actually wrought in Prussia, and urging the people to adopt the same successful system here. When the Legislature met i
Plymouth County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e societies with which he was connected. He was active in the Plymouth County Bible Society, and the year he was abroad the work languishedthe great work must begin by founding a State normal school in Plymouth County. I invited the audience to catechize me as much as they courman and secretary signed, praying for a teachers' seminary in Plymouth County. Hingham Gazette, February 24, 1837. This petition sets forto his general lecturing, Brooks worked for a normal school in Plymouth County. In September, 1838, a convention of the Plymouth County AssoPlymouth County Association for the improvement of schools was held at Hanover to urge the establishment of a normal school in Plymouth County. Mr. Brooks saw thPlymouth County. Mr. Brooks saw the importance of the meeting and of the thoughts brought out, for later he had an abstract of the speeches printed for circulation. To this mrry weight. The demand was that a normal school be located in Plymouth County. One was eventually established at Bridgewater, but instead of
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
nd requires special training, as does any other profession. There was an appreciation of the fact that schools might be improved, and suggestions had been offered as to how to bring about the desired result. Not only in Massachusetts, but in Connecticut, New York, and Pennsylvania, were there those who were thinking, talking, and planning, but no practicable result had as yet been reached. In later years, after Massachusetts showed the way, and proved by results its effectiveness, other stue, for the movement had acquired such great momentum that he was needed to guide it by explaining just what was needed. Up and down the state he went, two thousand miles in his chaise, and over into New Hampshire and Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York and Pennsylvania, ever ringing the changes on his maxim: As is the teacher, so is the school, stating the facts about what the system had actually wrought in Prussia, and urging the people to adopt the same successful system here.
New York (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
anges rung on the old theme of Plymouth Rock and the Old Colony, it is evident that any action a convention with such features might take, would carry weight. The demand was that a normal school be located in Plymouth County. One was eventually established at Bridgewater, but instead of being the first, it was the third. With this convention, Mr. Brooks' immediate labors ceased. About this time his name was suggested for the professorship of natural history in the University of the City of New York. His brilliant work in aid of the educational cause was well known, and that alone should have secured him the appointment, but in addition, he had the endorsement of four such men as Jared Sparks, Edward Everett, Josiah Quincy and John Quincy Adams. On receiving the appointment, he prepared to close his labors in Hingham, and the pastorate was terminated January 1, 1839, after eighteen years of service. If this paper were to end with this incident, the point made some time ago wou
Bridgewater (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e noted: Teachers should teach things. It is a reproach that the public schools are not superior to the private. If I had as many sons as old Priam, I would send them all to the public schools. With such speakers and with the changes rung on the old theme of Plymouth Rock and the Old Colony, it is evident that any action a convention with such features might take, would carry weight. The demand was that a normal school be located in Plymouth County. One was eventually established at Bridgewater, but instead of being the first, it was the third. With this convention, Mr. Brooks' immediate labors ceased. About this time his name was suggested for the professorship of natural history in the University of the City of New York. His brilliant work in aid of the educational cause was well known, and that alone should have secured him the appointment, but in addition, he had the endorsement of four such men as Jared Sparks, Edward Everett, Josiah Quincy and John Quincy Adams. On r
Oxford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Prussian stranger, began its journey from the Plymouth Rock. Address at Framingham. The convention after two days session, adopted resolutions endorsing Mr. Brooks' views. At all the conventions Mr. Brooks attended and where he spoke, it was his custom to have resolutions adopted, and these resolutions he prepared beforehand, so there was a unanimity in the demands. This Plymouth convention was followed in quick succession during December by others at Hingham, Duxbury, New Bedford, Fairhaven and Bridgewater. Evidently there was then no Christmas rush. He must have been satisfied with the response at these meetings, for again he calls another convention; this time it is for the specific purpose of securing for the Old Colony a seminary for teachers. The call was dated January 5, 1837, and was for a convention at Halifax on January 24, 1837. But after this call was issued and before the convention was held, a couple of events happened which satisfied Mr. Brooks that his wo
Hamburg, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
t Mr. Brooks a while ago, sailing for Europe in 1833. Let us return to him and hear him tell in his own words how he was led to take up this work. Framingham Address. At a literary soiree in London, August, 1834, I met Dr. H. Julius of Hamburg, then on his way to the United States, having been sent by the King of Prussia to learn the condition of our schools, hospitals, prisons, and other public institutions. He asked to be my room-mate on board ship. I was too happy to accede to thEducation and Crime in a letter to the Rt. Rev. William White, D. D., president of the Philadelphia Society for Alleviating the Miseries of Public Prisons, by Francis Lieber, Ll. D. To which are added some observations by N. H. Julius, M. D., of Hamburg, a corresponding member of the society. Published by order of the society, Philadelphia, 1835. The well-known-and since Mr. Cousin published his interesting report-far-famed Prussian system of national education went properly into practic
Manchester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Bell. One of the last clippings Brooks inserted in the scrap book was an obituary notice of his college friend, Bell. Samuel Dana Bell (1797-1868) was a son of Governor Samuel Bell of New Hampshire. He studied law and practiced in Concord and Manchester. In 1859 he was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court. He resigned in 1865 and died at Manchester July, 1868. This date in August, 1819, was chosen because that was the month in which Commencement exercises were then held. Manchester July, 1868. This date in August, 1819, was chosen because that was the month in which Commencement exercises were then held. Brooks took good rank in his course, and on graduation continued his theological studies at Harvard. In the month mentioned in the record of the wager he took his Master's degree and delivered the valedictory in Latin. This paper is still preserved. In November, 1820, he was invited to become pastor of the Third Church at Hingham at a salary of a thousand dollars, and here he remained until January, 1839, a period of eighteen years. Time permits only the mention of the activities of this en
Hinsdale (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
nfirmed by the researches of Dr. Hinsdale, whose conclusion we can adopt. He found that down to 1835, there is no direct evidence showing that American educators were acquainted with what had been done in Europe for the training of teachers. Hinsdale's Horace Mann, pp. 146-7. There had been, however, from time to time, expressions more or less formal, that teachers should be fitted for their work, for the reason that teaching is a profession, and requires special training, as does any oting condition, thus proving Carter's appreciation of what was needed. Later, as a member of the Legislature, he strove earnestly for the cause of education, as we shall see presently. Barnards Journal of Education, Vol. V, pp. 407-416; also Hinsdale's Mann. p. 52; Martin's Public School System, p. 147. But there was one thing lacking to set the work going, namely, the arousing of public sentiment to demand action that would lead to better teachers and better schools, and to this work,
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
hich he had labored had been accomplished when the board was created. But Mann urged him to keep on with his lecturing until normal schools were secured. Brooks replied that they were secured, now that the board had been established. Brooks, however, did continue, for the movement had acquired such great momentum that he was needed to guide it by explaining just what was needed. Up and down the state he went, two thousand miles in his chaise, and over into New Hampshire and Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York and Pennsylvania, ever ringing the changes on his maxim: As is the teacher, so is the school, stating the facts about what the system had actually wrought in Prussia, and urging the people to adopt the same successful system here. When the Legislature met in January, 1838, the next winter after the Board of Education had been established, the subject of normal schools was in the air and something had to be done. The Legislature wished to hear arguments, and Hora
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