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Mystick River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
last established the Symmes farm was included within Medford bounds, but later this part of Medford was set off to Winchester. Previous to 1860 the upper part of present Mystic lake was a meadow, large in extent, and not flowed over as at the present time by the Mystic Water Works dam. It was known as the Symmes' meadow, and the grass was cut for cattle. Previous to the contention now under consideration, it seems that Thomas Broughton and Edward Collins had erected a mill-dam on the Mystic river which was erected so high as to flow the upper part of the river, Mystic lake, and the Symmes' meadow, to the great damage of Symmes, according to the record. The location of the Broughton dam is said to have been just above the crossing of Arlington and Jerome streets, West Medford, but nothing in the record states the location of the dam. This mill privilege passed away long ago, and no one living remembers anything about it, but if it had been maintained to later times it would have b
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
court. The jury brought in their verdict, finding for the plaintiff with damages, Forty and One Shillings and costs of court, Three pounds, Thirteen Shillings and Eight pence. County Court Records, Vol. 1st, Page 296. The evidences (testimony of the witnesses) in this case are not to be found, but it is plain that Symmes won the suit, and that the costs of court were much larger than the amount of damage, as is liable to be the case today. The record shows that Johnathan Whitney of Watertown, one of the writer's ancestors, was one of the jurors in this case, which has a tendency to make him believe that the verdict was a just one! Another contention which was settled in court in Charlestown, October 6, 1663, was of a little different character from either of the other two already cited. It indicates how closely bound together were the church and the people, and how the former insisted, as much as possible, in doing all the thinking for the people, especially in church and
Johnathan Wade (search for this): chapter 1
ere given up to him. But Converse would not admit a permanent defeat, and six months later, December 10, 1670, he brought action against Collins for review of the case. The witnesses in the review were mostly for Converse. They testified that after the court the mare was carryd to Mr. Collins but she came back again, and being fetched away she returned again after harvist. When lett gow at liberti shee might agon away, but would not at any time. Jacob Cole, Samuel Frost, John Carter, Johnathan Wade, Thomas Gleason, Jermiah Sweyn, Samuel Champney and others all testified that the mare and colt belonged to Converse, that she was not branded, and that colt's teeth were found in hir mouth and that she was coming five years old. One witness testified shee was going six years old and had never been branded. It is evident that the mare and colt claimed Josiah Converse as their owner and his farm as their home. As the mare would not remain at the Collins farm, and could not be of much
Jacob Cole (search for this): chapter 1
and colt belonged to Collins, and both were given up to him. But Converse would not admit a permanent defeat, and six months later, December 10, 1670, he brought action against Collins for review of the case. The witnesses in the review were mostly for Converse. They testified that after the court the mare was carryd to Mr. Collins but she came back again, and being fetched away she returned again after harvist. When lett gow at liberti shee might agon away, but would not at any time. Jacob Cole, Samuel Frost, John Carter, Johnathan Wade, Thomas Gleason, Jermiah Sweyn, Samuel Champney and others all testified that the mare and colt belonged to Converse, that she was not branded, and that colt's teeth were found in hir mouth and that she was coming five years old. One witness testified shee was going six years old and had never been branded. It is evident that the mare and colt claimed Josiah Converse as their owner and his farm as their home. As the mare would not remain at th
Johnathan Whitney (search for this): chapter 1
he record of this court. The jury brought in their verdict, finding for the plaintiff with damages, Forty and One Shillings and costs of court, Three pounds, Thirteen Shillings and Eight pence. County Court Records, Vol. 1st, Page 296. The evidences (testimony of the witnesses) in this case are not to be found, but it is plain that Symmes won the suit, and that the costs of court were much larger than the amount of damage, as is liable to be the case today. The record shows that Johnathan Whitney of Watertown, one of the writer's ancestors, was one of the jurors in this case, which has a tendency to make him believe that the verdict was a just one! Another contention which was settled in court in Charlestown, October 6, 1663, was of a little different character from either of the other two already cited. It indicates how closely bound together were the church and the people, and how the former insisted, as much as possible, in doing all the thinking for the people, especial
Zachariah Symmes (search for this): chapter 1
d dispute to which attention is called is that of the Rev. Zachariah Symmes, first minister of the Charlestown church, with M was given to the ministers. Both John Harvard and Rev. Zachariah Symmes were presented with farms in ancient Waterfield, th homesteads in Winchester now owned by descendants of Zachariah Symmes which have never passed out of the family possessionystic lake, and the Symmes' meadow, to the great damage of Symmes, according to the record. The location of the Broughton d County Court held at Charlestown, June 16th, 1675, Mr. Zachariah Symmes, plaintiff appears against Mr. Thomas Broughton ands) in this case are not to be found, but it is plain that Symmes won the suit, and that the costs of court were much largerhat Mrs. Cole indulged in defamatory talk against the Rev. Zachariah Symmes, who was also a Waterfield and, later, a Medford,said she had as leife hear an old cat mew as hear the Rev. Zachariah Symmes preach. Perhaps Mrs. Cole's judgment was good as
William Symmes (search for this): chapter 1
ester but originally belonging to Charlestown. This fact may account for the high moral tone for which the town of Winchester has always been celebrated! The Harvard farm was situated near the present Catholic cemetery in Winchester, and the Symmes farm, of several hundred acres, was situated at head of Mystic lake, and extended nearly to present Winchester center. The first Symmes house was erected in the center of the Winchester playground, and was occupied and afterwards owned by William Symmes, the only son of Zachariah. There are several homesteads in Winchester now owned by descendants of Zachariah Symmes which have never passed out of the family possessions. When the lines of Medford were at last established the Symmes farm was included within Medford bounds, but later this part of Medford was set off to Winchester. Previous to 1860 the upper part of present Mystic lake was a meadow, large in extent, and not flowed over as at the present time by the Mystic Water Works
Samuel Champney (search for this): chapter 1
t a permanent defeat, and six months later, December 10, 1670, he brought action against Collins for review of the case. The witnesses in the review were mostly for Converse. They testified that after the court the mare was carryd to Mr. Collins but she came back again, and being fetched away she returned again after harvist. When lett gow at liberti shee might agon away, but would not at any time. Jacob Cole, Samuel Frost, John Carter, Johnathan Wade, Thomas Gleason, Jermiah Sweyn, Samuel Champney and others all testified that the mare and colt belonged to Converse, that she was not branded, and that colt's teeth were found in hir mouth and that she was coming five years old. One witness testified shee was going six years old and had never been branded. It is evident that the mare and colt claimed Josiah Converse as their owner and his farm as their home. As the mare would not remain at the Collins farm, and could not be of much use to him, it is probable the jury thought bes
Thomas Gleason (search for this): chapter 1
him. But Converse would not admit a permanent defeat, and six months later, December 10, 1670, he brought action against Collins for review of the case. The witnesses in the review were mostly for Converse. They testified that after the court the mare was carryd to Mr. Collins but she came back again, and being fetched away she returned again after harvist. When lett gow at liberti shee might agon away, but would not at any time. Jacob Cole, Samuel Frost, John Carter, Johnathan Wade, Thomas Gleason, Jermiah Sweyn, Samuel Champney and others all testified that the mare and colt belonged to Converse, that she was not branded, and that colt's teeth were found in hir mouth and that she was coming five years old. One witness testified shee was going six years old and had never been branded. It is evident that the mare and colt claimed Josiah Converse as their owner and his farm as their home. As the mare would not remain at the Collins farm, and could not be of much use to him, it i
descendants of today. The court records show that legal disputes were fully as popular, according to population, and as necessary, perhaps, for the good of society, as they are at present. Some of these contentions are interesting as showing the characteristics of the people who engaged in them, and the manner of dispensing justice in the early days of the colony. The first contest to which attention is called, relates to an acute misunderstanding between Edward Collins of Medford (Governor Cradock's successor in ownership of the Cradock plantation) and Josiah Converse of Woburn, who owned the ancient corne mill and farm, which descended to him from Edward Converse, the father of Woburn, who built the first house and mill in what was then called Waterfield, later Woburn, and at present Winchester. Edward Converse, in his will, devised the mill, now known as the Whitney Mill, Winchester, to the longest liver of his two sons. The successful liver proved to be Josiah Converse, his
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