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id, I am willing to take the principles of that speech as the basis of my administration. Among other early writers we find Timothy Bigelow, lawyer, many of whose orations from 1767 to 1790 have been preserved, and a Journal of a Tour to the Falls of Niagara, reprinted. Samuel Hall was editor of the Essex Gazette, New England Chronicle, Salem Gazette, and Massachusetts Gazette, 1768-1807. Edward Brooks was a contributor to the North American Review. A unique pamphlet was written in 1847 by Abijah Baker—The Ark, Ships and Shipbuilding, with a Brie History of the Art, and a register of vessels built in Medford. James Gilchrist Swan wrote Life in the Northwest, in 1857, and later the Amoor River. He was the author of many monographs on ethnology and made himself an authority, through observation, on the customs and languages of the Northwestern Indians. Much of his work was given to the Smithsonian Institution, and he filled many important public positions. Judge Swan pre
nted record behind them. The Rev. Benjamin Colman, who preached in Medford in 1693, was a model of literary excellence in his sermons. Rev. Ebenezer Turell, who occupied the Medford pulpit from 1724 to 1778, published a pamphlet on Witchcraft, and A Direction to My People in Relation to the Present Times, which plead for a religion founded on truth and soberness rather than one arising from emotion. Even more in advance of the times was a discourse in favor of inoculation for smallpox. In 1741 he published A Memoir of the Life and Death of the Pious and Ingenuous Mrs. Jane Colman Turell, who died at Medford, March 26, 1735, aetat 27. Most of the quaint prose and poetry was collected from her own manuscript, and his part of the work included a sketch of her father, the Rev. Benjamin Colman. Many discourses of the Rev. David Osgood were published from 1784 to 1824, one especially notable in 1783, Reflections on the Goodness of God in Supporting the People of the United States Thr
nd a register of vessels built in Medford. James Gilchrist Swan wrote Life in the Northwest, in 1857, and later the Amoor River. He was the author of many monographs on ethnology and made himself an authority, through observation, on the customs and languages of the Northwestern Indians. Much of his work was given to the Smithsonian Institution, and he filled many important public positions. Judge Swan presented the collection of Indian relics and curios to the Medford Public Library in 1880. In 1856, a Medford lad of seventeen, Nathaniel Holmes Bishop, with forty dollars in his pocket, shipped before the mast and sailed to Buenos Ayres. From there he tramped, with a caravan of natives and aliens, over the Pampas, the Cordilleras, crossed the Andes through the snow, dangerously alone, landed in Chili, where he shipped again for the long voyage around Cape Horn, and reached home with five additional dollars in his pocket. The journal of this One Thousand Mile Walk Across Sout
ine, 1816, published with added poems in 1850; Sabbath Recreations, 1839; Lays of the Sabbath, 1850; Pilgrims of Plymouth, 1856. He was deeply interested in the cause of education and compiled a number of readers for use in schools. The American Fimotive of good morals, and to aid in the diffusion of valuable information. This was merged into a free public library in 1856, through the generosity of the stockholders, and was added to from time to time by gifts from private citizens. This librc positions. Judge Swan presented the collection of Indian relics and curios to the Medford Public Library in 1880. In 1856, a Medford lad of seventeen, Nathaniel Holmes Bishop, with forty dollars in his pocket, shipped before the mast and sailedled a book on Practical American Cookery and Domestic Economy that would repay study, even in the changed conditions since 1856. Elizur Wright, a man of words as well as deeds, translated La Fontaine's Fables, 1859, and wrote Savings Bank Life In
, including all the comforts of home, use of carriages, saddle horses, salt water bathing, gymnasium, bowling alley, and all the privileges of day scholars, Spanish, German and Italian extra, three hundred dollars a year. Quoted from year book. Names of the pupils enrolled in these schools have always been and are found among the literary people of the town, thus showing an influence that has been carried down through generations. Free public schools were founded in Medford in 1670; in 1776 the people voted that the master instruct girls for two hours after the boys are dismissed, but not until 1834 was it decreed that the girls shall enjoy equal privileges therein with the boys throughout the year. This may have been one reason for the prevalence of private schools for girls and for boys and girls. This edict was not carried out, however, until the high school was organized in 1835, one of the first three free schools in the State for both sexes, devoted to the higher branche
e L. Stearns, opened a school in 791 that became the leading Academy of the United States, to quote the opinion of the time. Susannah Rowson, famous as the author of Charlotte Temple, Lucy Temple, and Sarah, moved her large school to Medford in 1800, when she wished its girls to have the advantages of a country life. She also wrote a volume of poems and an abridgment of Universal Geography. Dr. John Hosmer, John Angier, A. K. Hathaway, Miss Ann Rose, Miss Hannah Swan, Mrs. Newton, and othny believed her to have been the original of the Woman in White, by Wilkie Collins. Dr. John Brooks, one of Medford's most distinguished citizens, delivered an oration before the Society of the Cincinnati in 1787; a Eulogy on George Washington, 1800; Discourse Before the Humane Society, 1795; and a remarkable Farewell to the Militia of the Commonwealth in 1823, all of which are in print. Of his inaugural address, when governor of Massachusetts, President Monroe said, I am willing to take the
t is known as the Davenport Herbarium. He wrote for the Botanical Gazette, on botanical nomenclature, many monographs on ferns, on which subject he was a recognized authority. He delivered a lecture with lantern slides, on the Middlesex Fells many times for the benefit of the Fells, and poems and essays of his are to be found in periodicals. Mrs. Josephine L. Richards made herself an authority on native wild flowers and ferns, and described them so graphically in Wild Flowers and Ferns, 1893, that the reader could discern them for himself. Mrs. Etta Austin Macdonald, at one time superintendent of Brockton schools, and her sister, Miss Mary Frances Blaisdell, have issued an instructive set of school readers for young children, the first, The Child at Play; the second, Child Life in Tale and Fable; third, Child Life in Many Lands; the fourth and fifth, Child Life in Literature. The selections are chosen from the best literature in an original manner, and the workmanship is exce
his neighbor, William D. Howells, as material for his work. Howells replied to him as did Henry James to George Du Maurier under similar circumstances, Write them yourself. Sarah Warner Brooks was the author of three volumes of poetry—Blanche, published in 1858; St. Christopher, and Other Poems, in 1859; and the Search of Ceres, and Other Poems, in 1900; also a volume of criticism, English Poetry and Poets, in 1890. She wrote two volumes of short stories, My Fire Opal, and Other Tales, 1896, and Poverty Knob in 1900. Alamo Ranch appeared in 1903, and A Garden with House Attached in 1904. Four of these books were written after she was seventy-eight years of age and the last one in her eighty-third year. Mary B. Carret, whose childhood was spent alternately between the Island of Cuba and the Royall House, wrote, in 1899, The Little Hero of Matanzas. Louise Winsor Brooks made one of the wisest and most delightful books for children ever written, accessible to English readers
he year 1886. Edward Preston Usher wrote The Church's Attitude Towards Truth, 1907, and a memorial sketch of Roland Greene Usher, to which is added a genealogy of the Usher family in New England. Henry Grosvenor Cary wrote The Cary Family in England and the Cary Family in America. Thomas Brooks compiled the family record of Jonathan and Elizabeth Brooks. The writings of Frank Preston Stearns cover a wide range of subjects—art, literature, criticism, biography, political science. In 1888 he edited a book on John Brown, by Herman von Holtz, for which he was singularly fitted through his personal knowledge of John Brown. In 1895 he published Sketches from Concord and Appledore, and in 1905 Cambridge Sketches, both intimate biographies of famous men. In 1892 appeared Real and Ideal in Literature, and in 1897 Modern English Prose Writers. He also wrote Four Great Venetians and the Midsummer of Italian Art; a Life of Otto von Bismarck; Life and Genius of Nathaniel Hawthorne; th
d, the first president of Tufts College, and many addresses. Rev. Elmer H. Capen, president of Tufts College from 1875 to 1905, published many articles and sermons, a tribute to John Boyle O'Reilly, wrote a history of Tufts College and of Universalirly fitted through his personal knowledge of John Brown. In 1895 he published Sketches from Concord and Appledore, and in 1905 Cambridge Sketches, both intimate biographies of famous men. In 1892 appeared Real and Ideal in Literature, and in 1897 Motwood Wasson, is the author of three volumes of short stories, Cap'n Simeon's Store, published in 1903; The Green Shay, in 1905; and Home from Sea, in 1908. Many others of his stories have appeared in the Atlantic, the Outlook, and other periodicalstory. Mary Augusta Kellogg is the author of Leo Dayne, a novel. Amy Woods has written many magazine articles, and in 1905 a book called Mr. Penwiper's Fairy Godmother. Marion K. Loud, another young woman born in Medford, is the author of A P
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