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Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
perintendent of the Senior Department of the school. Mrs. Ella J. Fuller, who served as superintendent of the Primary Department for several years, did most excellent and effective work there, and her successors have well followed her lead. Although many names have been referred to as among the faithful and efficient members, those who know the inner history of Union Church will feel that the lasting gratitude of the church is due to Deacon Harry L. Jones, formerly of Medford (now of Newton, Mass.) for his financial assistance in trying times. But time would fail me to tell of all those faithful souls, both men and women, whose faith and labors have brought the undertaking from a beginning so feeble, so frail, worthy not so much of admiration as of pity, to an expansion so ample, a progress so steady, a promise, yet to be fulfilled, that will, we trust, be glorious. In the year 1810 Eaton S. Barrett, in his poem entitled Woman, writes, Not she with trait'rous kiss her Sav
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
on the 12th of the same month, Alexander Robertson, Thomas Patterson and Nathaniel P. Richardson were chosen deacons. At the same meeting John G. Thompson was elected as the first clerk. On December 1, 1887, a council was held in the chapel on Broadway, which recognized the new society under the name of the Union Congregational Church of Medford. A large number of delegates from sister churches were present, and Rev. W. S. Alexander preached a sermon at the public recognition services in the to all property in the hands of church members only, wisely provided against any future loss to the denomination. All sittings in the church are free, and always have been so, the expenses being met by voluntary contributions. The chapel on Broadway where they worshiped was owned by private parties, who were not fully in sympathy with the idea of forming a new church. As they did not wish to sell the chapel to the new organization, that body decided to seek other quarters, and succeeded in
Hanover (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
d to which, as to all his duties, he gave his best energies. After his resignation he removed to Wellesley Hills where he now resides. He left the church much stronger than it was at his coming, with a membership of about one hundred and a Sabbath School of more than two hundred members. Although there was a serious division at the time of his departure, the trouble that overshadowed the work began to pass away soon after the arrival of his successor, the Rev. John Wild, formerly of Hanover, Mass., who began his pastorate May 1, 1904. Mr. Wild's ministry has been one of reconciliation and upbuilding. He found a rapidly growing community, with new families needing and seeking a church home and religious influences, and he has striven to the limit of his powers to meet the demands that the situation presented. Seven years of his pastorate have just been completed, and the results are very creditable to the efforts both of himself and of the faithful corps of men and women who
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
and was occupied by about one hundred and twenty families, three-fourths of whom were Protestants. A few of these were associated with the two churches then on Winter Hill in Somerville, and a few others attended the churches in Medford Center. The long, lonely walk to Medford, cold and bleak in winter and hot in summer, and the wearisome climb up Winter Hill, tended to keep many away from church, who would have been glad to attend had there been a more convenient place of worship. In 1887 the Home Missionary Society of the Congregational Churches engaged Rev. F. I. Kelley (a student in Boston University) to hold preaching services in the chapel at the the winter, and it was thus used until the main audience room was completed and the church dedicated in November, 1890. From its starting, sister churches on Winter Hill and those in the Woburn Conference gave friendly counsel and substantial financial aid, and acting under advice and assistance of these friends the church soon
Derry, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ing period of the church life. It was his first pastorate, and he threw himself into his trying labors with all the energy of his young manhood. His sermons were earnest and excellent, and he was faithful in his pastoral calling. He resigned July 16, 1889, to accept the call to the Congregational Church at Pigeon Cove, Mass., and his parish soon realized that it would be fortunate indeed if it could secure a successor who would be his equal. He is now pastor of the Old First Church in Derry, N. H., where he has been settled for several years. On October 27, 1889, Rev. C. C. Bruce, a resident of Medford, came to preach as a supply, and November 3, 1889, was chosen pastor for six months, and continued to serve in that capacity until May 29, 1891. He was a scholarly man and a student, but his physical condition was such that he was not able to do the work needful in a new parish, and as a consequence the church steadily lost ground. Shortly after resigning his pastorate a stroke
Pigeon Cove (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
gely through his efforts and courage came the measure of success that marked the first two years of the church's existence. He did excellent work during the organization and building period of the church life. It was his first pastorate, and he threw himself into his trying labors with all the energy of his young manhood. His sermons were earnest and excellent, and he was faithful in his pastoral calling. He resigned July 16, 1889, to accept the call to the Congregational Church at Pigeon Cove, Mass., and his parish soon realized that it would be fortunate indeed if it could secure a successor who would be his equal. He is now pastor of the Old First Church in Derry, N. H., where he has been settled for several years. On October 27, 1889, Rev. C. C. Bruce, a resident of Medford, came to preach as a supply, and November 3, 1889, was chosen pastor for six months, and continued to serve in that capacity until May 29, 1891. He was a scholarly man and a student, but his physical co
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
was thus used until the main audience room was completed and the church dedicated in November, 1890. From its starting, sister churches on Winter Hill and those in the Woburn Conference gave friendly counsel and substantial financial aid, and acting under advice and assistance of these friends the church soon completed the new edifice. The sister churches contributed the sum needed to make last payments for the same, and the house, costing $3,000, was dedicated free from debt. The Massachusetts Home Missionary Society assisted the church in the support of a pastor from the beginning, and has continued its aid up to the present time, although the church at present comes very near to self-support, and contributes liberally toward the various missionary and benevolent organizations of the denomination. The Congregational Church Building Society has assisted towards the expense of the church building when occasion has required such aid. The Mystic Church of Medford presented the f
James Donovan (search for this): chapter 8
n those early trying days is due, should be remembered Miss Janet Brown, in whose home on Marion street the church organization was first agreed upon; the Fraser sisters; the members of the Robertson, Patterson, Hosford, Richardson, Davidson and Donovan families. To the first pastor, the Rev. Frederick I. Kelley, and to his devoted wife, are due the lasting gratitude of the members of his flock. Largely through his efforts and courage came the measure of success that marked the first two ye as superintendents are recorded as follows:— John G. Thompson. N. P. Richardson. C. A. Van Winkle. Mrs. E. J. Fuller, Superintendent of Primary Department. Mrs. Armstrong, Superintendent of Primary Department. Rev. F. I. Kelley. James Donovan. Percy H. Hodgman. In no department of its activities does the church better serve the needs of the community than in its school. The vicinity is rich in children, and the school has ministered to them with marked success. To no party s
W. S. Alexander (search for this): chapter 8
87, the Articles of Faith and Covenant were adopted by the church, and on the 12th of the same month, Alexander Robertson, Thomas Patterson and Nathaniel P. Richardson were chosen deacons. At the same meeting John G. Thompson was elected as the first clerk. On December 1, 1887, a council was held in the chapel on Broadway, which recognized the new society under the name of the Union Congregational Church of Medford. A large number of delegates from sister churches were present, and Rev. W. S. Alexander preached a sermon at the public recognition services in the evening. In organizing, the church made what was then rather a new departure in Congregational procedure. It provided that the society in whom the title to the property was vested, should consist exclusively of adult members of the church, either male or female. The old custom had been to have the society consist, not of church members alone, but of such adult males as owned or hired sittings in the meeting house. That wa
Janet Brown (search for this): chapter 8
. Too much praise can hardly be bestowed upon the sacrifice and endeavor of the people themselves. As has been stated, few of the members could contribute very largely, and the continuous demand and strain upon their resources discouraged the less earnest ones, causing some to withdraw, and leaving only the more devoted ones to continue the work. Among those to whose zeal and faithfulness the continued existence of the church in those early trying days is due, should be remembered Miss Janet Brown, in whose home on Marion street the church organization was first agreed upon; the Fraser sisters; the members of the Robertson, Patterson, Hosford, Richardson, Davidson and Donovan families. To the first pastor, the Rev. Frederick I. Kelley, and to his devoted wife, are due the lasting gratitude of the members of his flock. Largely through his efforts and courage came the measure of success that marked the first two years of the church's existence. He did excellent work during the
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