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East India (search for this): chapter 1
was in his seventy-fifth year, having been born in Medford, March I, 1787. From 1815 to 1850 he was well known to all who had business transactions at the state house, having been for a long period the chief clerk in the office of the secretary of the commonwealth. For several years past he has resided in Salem, quietly enjoying the fruits of his well-spent active life. Capt. James Gilchrist, born in Danvers, 1770, married Susan Wyman of Medford, June 10, 1805. He was engaged in the East India trade, sailing from Salem and Boston. They made their home in the house on High street generally called the Train house, moved to the one called the Ebenezer Turell or Jonathan Porter house, then again to the former. Six or seven of their nine children were born in this town, and after a residence of seventeen years the family moved to Charlestown, N. H., where Captain Gilchrist died, 1827. When we see what was the caliber of the members of this family, we realize that what was our loss
Pasture Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
sat opposite him at a banquet of the society. Harriet Martineau, the English writer, came to this country in 1835, remaining two years. She was a guest in the home of Rev. Caleb Stetson, pastor of the First Parish, Medford, and corresponded with him. The parsonage then was the home on High street, later the residence of the late John Ayres, now the site of the parish house of St. Joseph's Church. As the guest and family sat together looking out on the Mystic river below, or low lying Pasture Hill above, there must have been much pleasant conversation on subjects of common interest, for Miss Martineau's brother was a celebrated Unitarian divine. A relative of the Stetsons says, There floats in my mind a dim tradition of Miss Lucy Osgood having made a tea party for Miss Martineau at that time, borrowing my aunt's guest knives and forks, as extras were needed, but not inviting her. I doubt if any ladies were present but the two sisters and Miss Martineau; they found manly-scholarl
Austria (Austria) (search for this): chapter 1
s early years he was a tenor singer of high qualifications, with a voice of great expression of feeling. He was born in Somerville and later moved to Boston. He displayed a taste for singing when very young. He spent many years in Germany and Austria, where he became a celebrated opera singer. The Emperor of Austria frequently requested Mr. Adams to sing before him and his friends at Vienna, and Mr. Adams brought home to America a laurel wreath presented him while abroad. Antonio F. de NAustria frequently requested Mr. Adams to sing before him and his friends at Vienna, and Mr. Adams brought home to America a laurel wreath presented him while abroad. Antonio F. de Navarro received reflected glory by his marriage(1889) with Mary Anderson, the beautiful actress. We mention him because he was a pupil at the A. K. Hathaway private school on Chestnut street, where there were many students of Spanish extraction. (The school lasted from 1846-1860.) Who can say that Medford has not an interesting history back of her with plenty of variety? Is there not enough charm in it to attract the attention of the boys and girls for whom our city today is spending mone
Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
(1879-1882). At that time he was filling an engagement with opera companies at the Boston Theatre. In his early years he was a tenor singer of high qualifications, with a voice of great expression of feeling. He was born in Somerville and later moved to Boston. He displayed a taste for singing when very young. He spent many years in Germany and Austria, where he became a celebrated opera singer. The Emperor of Austria frequently requested Mr. Adams to sing before him and his friends at Vienna, and Mr. Adams brought home to America a laurel wreath presented him while abroad. Antonio F. de Navarro received reflected glory by his marriage(1889) with Mary Anderson, the beautiful actress. We mention him because he was a pupil at the A. K. Hathaway private school on Chestnut street, where there were many students of Spanish extraction. (The school lasted from 1846-1860.) Who can say that Medford has not an interesting history back of her with plenty of variety? Is there not en
Puritan (Colorado, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
tury, and in more recent years. It is not within the limits of this paper to recall those that have been noticed in the pages of the Register, nor to complete the list of those that have not been printed, but it is sufficient to mention a few, taking them in nearly consecutive periods of time, or else in groups. The names of the clergymen who were present at the installation, dismissal or burial of Medford pastors, or who came to preach by way of exchange, make a notable list of early Puritan divines who were always honored guests of our people at such times, but as they are found in the histories by Brooks and by Usher, they need no mention. Although the family of the writer was not among Medford's first settlers, yet she is glad to claim connection with the early history of the place where the family home was established many years ago, through her relative on the paternal side, Judge Samuel Sewall of witchcraft fame. He frequently came to call upon his niece (1713, etc.)
Danvers (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
sly spelled) in Medford, August 13, 1807, give credence to the supposition. Jeremiah Page of Danvers responded to the Lexington alarm and served as an officer in the Revolution. He was an ardent sale of slaves, found in a garret of a house in North Adams, and reads as follows:— Danvers, Mass., April 19, 1774. Received of Mr. Jeremiah Page fifty eight pounds thirteen Shillings And homestead, in good condition, is today one of the historic places pointed out to the visitor to Danvers. Our interest in the young man who built this colonial house for himself at the time of his ma'45, '46. At the invitation of a Mr. Andrews, whose daughter he married afterwards, he went to Danvers to engage in the business of brick making. Without doubt he had learned much concerning it in m, quietly enjoying the fruits of his well-spent active life. Capt. James Gilchrist, born in Danvers, 1770, married Susan Wyman of Medford, June 10, 1805. He was engaged in the East India trade,
Boothbay (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
and, several families came to Medford. William McClintock, when others of his companions went on to found the town of Londonderry, N. H., named for their old world home, settled on the Mystic river. He married four times, had nineteen children and died at the age of ninety. I do not know how long he remained here, but for some years the McClintock name was on the town records. The William McClintock and his wife Jane, who settled here for a few years after their marriage and moved to Boothbay, Me., was probably a son of the former. William the elder was an industrious farmer, laboring quietly, not entering into public life. His third wife was the mother of Samuel, coming with her husband to New England. The boy's education began in our grammar school and was continued under Master Minot at Concord, Mass., and Rev. Mr. Abercrombie in an academy near Northampton, Mass. He graduated from the college of New Jersey in 1751, which was then at Newark. A few years later it was rem
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
e, but for some years the McClintock name was on the town records. The William McClintock and his wife Jane, who settled here for a few years after their marriage and moved to Boothbay, Me., was probably a son of the former. William the elder was an industrious farmer, laboring quietly, not entering into public life. His third wife was the mother of Samuel, coming with her husband to New England. The boy's education began in our grammar school and was continued under Master Minot at Concord, Mass., and Rev. Mr. Abercrombie in an academy near Northampton, Mass. He graduated from the college of New Jersey in 1751, which was then at Newark. A few years later it was removed to Princeton and has since been known by that name. He was under the tutelage and influence of President Burr, father of Aaron Burr. His service to his country and his sacrifices were in direct contrast to that of the president's notorious and despised son. Samuel McClintock became the pastor of the Congre
Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
rs in Rev. Mr. Turell's congregation was Gov. Jonathan Belcher. As he was one of the royal governors we may imagine he came with some show of pomp, but not enough, we hope, to distract attention from the minister and his discourse. A touch of the romantic was given our staid little town when Sir Henry Frankland and Agnes Surriage (between 1745 and 1775) came on horseback to call on the Royalls at their fine mansion, then in the height of its splendor. How little did the fair maid from Marblehead then dream that a hundred and fifty years later she would be a beautiful heroine, a figure of interest in prose and poetry, and that a tangible evidence of herself would be exhibited in that house, in the same room, perchance, where she was being received. A fan, with finely carved sticks, and picturing in brilliant colors the coronation of George the Second, that once belonged to Agnes Surriage, was shown at the Sarah Bradlee-Fulton Chapter, D. A. R., Loan Exhibit at the Royall House, Ap
Puritan (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
s:— Ah, brother! only I and thou Are left of all that circle now,— The dear home faces whereupon That fitful firelight paled and shone. Matthew Whittier wrote under the name of Ethan Spike, and in physical and general characteristics was unlike the gentle poet. He was tall, of rather heavy features and florid complexion. On the street he was a noticeable figure, for he wore a long cape, tall hat and though very erect carried a stout cane. When I first saw him I thought some old Puritan had come back to life. Charles R. Adams, who won fame on the operatic stage abroad, is remembered by many, as he had a residence here for several years (1879-1882). At that time he was filling an engagement with opera companies at the Boston Theatre. In his early years he was a tenor singer of high qualifications, with a voice of great expression of feeling. He was born in Somerville and later moved to Boston. He displayed a taste for singing when very young. He spent many years in G
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