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James M. Usher (search for this): chapter 7
Medford artillery. ONE organization, of military character, at one time existed that has never found place in Medford annals, though its time fell just previous to the revision of Brooks' history by Mr. Usher. We refer to the Magoun Battery. In the preparation of this sketch the writer has consulted the records of the selectmen, the published annual reports of the town officers, records at the State House, and the files of Medford and Boston papers. He has also conversed with numerousl celebrations. This was attended by the Magoun Battery, which took the place assigned it in the procession, and also on June 7th it attended the centennial of Bunker Hill, in Charlestown and Boston. This last was the company's busy day, as James M. Usher and others had asked for a salute at West Medford, as well as at the center of the town, which was fired at morning and night. On June 28 some of the East Medford people asked for a share of the noise, and as the western section wanted mor
Theophilus (search for this): chapter 7
undred years ago. Because of this it bore the name Old Hickory. In later years it was mounted as a ship's gun on the Kate Hastings, one of the vessels of Henry Hastings of Medford. Still later it was given by him to George Nichols, who had it for some years, and who at last loaned it for exhibition in another town. We are told it was to a club, Wild Goose by name. At all events, it went on a wild-goose chase and never came back to Medford. After Mr. Nichols got it, it was remounted, Theophilus (Tope) Johnson making an oaken carriage, such as it formerly had. It was heard often in the ante-bellum days on Fourth of July, election times, and during war time in Medford. Special mention is made of the racket made one Sunday forenoon, on the receipt of news of the capture of Jeff Davis. The gun was placed on the marsh, where is now the parkway and Armory bridge, and the indignation of the worshipers at the Trinitarian Church just across the river was intense as they hastily reti
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
tain Clark's charge thirty years ago? Some three years since we learned of their location. Though not generally known, they remain where the selectmen placed them—in the armory of the Light Guard. They are marked 458 and 459 (probably foundry numbers). They are about three and three-quarters inch bore, five and three-quarters outside at muzzle, nine at breech, and four feet in length. On each is cast the figure of an eagle, and in each is cut the inscription, Presented to the Town of Medford, Mass., June 17, 1874. No copy of Mr. Magoun's letter of presentation appears in the printed report of town officers, issued February, 1875. We recall it as it appeared in the Medford journal of June, 1874. It was probably overshadowed by the larger and more useful gift of Mr. Magoun of the Mansion House of my honoured father, for a library building. Yet the gift of the guns was prompted by a spirit of helpfulness to his town as an economic measure. We scarcely think that the donor expect
Swallow (Utah, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ice. Prior to and during the Civil War many vessels carried an armament, for protection in foreign seas and against Confederate cruisers. One of these was the Swallow, owned by Thatcher Magoun of Medford, which had two brass cannon (six pounders), mounted on low wooden carriages after the usual manner of ships' guns. Mr. Magnown, as inquiry at his office reveals nothing. Evidently such an association was or had been formed, as a week later a petition was received from members of the Swallow Battery, asking for the guns to be placed in their care and possession. Whether they were so placed, or remained guests at the almshouse, is uncertain, as nothins has been said) that the men wore coats cut in style of evening dress; by some at times they were called the Swallow-tail Battery. They were at first called the Swallow Battery (from the name of the ship), but the tail was simply an appendage, and was applied in the same spirit of banter as was the burlesque Muldoon Battery in an
Magoun (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
gh its time fell just previous to the revision of Brooks' history by Mr. Usher. We refer to the Magoun Battery. In the preparation of this sketch the writer has consulted the records of the select 1875, occurred at Lexington the first of the centennial celebrations. This was attended by the Magoun Battery, which took the place assigned it in the procession, and also on June 7th it attended thrnish the powder. Just before this they had voted to allow Mr. Allen to use the wheels of the Magoun Battery. Heman Allen was the chief of the highway men, and so it is reasonable to conclude that that attracted much attention. On December 1, 1884, the selectmen voted that the guns of the Magoun Battery be placed in charge of Captain Clark's command, i.e., the Lawrence Light Guard. May 28, ary 17, 1891, the selectmen granted the library committee permission to remove the trucks of the Magoun Battery from the shop of Dawson & Porter to the library or elsewhere, as they may see fit. The t
house (italics our own). Two days later the committee reported the guns received and stored at the almshouse. Though Medford had the guns and the money too, they continued to be lodged at the almshouse, and the town paid Battery C $100 for a salute on the Fourth of July, $8.90 for cleaning guns, and $15 to Uncle David Simpson for meals for the battery men. And now appears a citizen, Charles Russell by name, and others who urged the formation of an artillery company to take charge of the Swallow battery and use it in accordance with the intent of the donor. As such an organization was not a part of the State militia, its status was much like that of the old fire companies, and yielding to their desire, the selectmen on November 7, 1874, record the signing of a petition to the Governor for a license to form an association to care for the guns. Who was to present the same, or whether it ever reached the Governor, is not known, as inquiry at his office reveals nothing. Evidently su
William Stetson (search for this): chapter 7
M. Usher and others had asked for a salute at West Medford, as well as at the center of the town, which was fired at morning and night. On June 28 some of the East Medford people asked for a share of the noise, and as the western section wanted more on July 5, the selectmen settled the matter by directing Captain Russell to fire with both guns at the center. The guns and equipment were housed somewhere temporarily until late in the year, when a building was erected for the town by William Stetson, at an expense of $600, upon the Swan lot, known as the Pit, where is now Governors Avenue. The company preferred this location to one on Union street, and the matter was left to the discretion of selectman Hooper, who foreseeing possible exigencies, there placed it, the highway men building the foundation therefor, thus securing a storage place beneath for some of their apparatus. It was a serviceable structure, and the selectmen reported that in the latter respect it would prove an
David Simpson (search for this): chapter 7
record of June 27, 1874. The board voted to receive the cannon and make an acknowledgment with thanks, and further voted to place the cannon in charge of the committee on almshouse (italics our own). Two days later the committee reported the guns received and stored at the almshouse. Though Medford had the guns and the money too, they continued to be lodged at the almshouse, and the town paid Battery C $100 for a salute on the Fourth of July, $8.90 for cleaning guns, and $15 to Uncle David Simpson for meals for the battery men. And now appears a citizen, Charles Russell by name, and others who urged the formation of an artillery company to take charge of the Swallow battery and use it in accordance with the intent of the donor. As such an organization was not a part of the State militia, its status was much like that of the old fire companies, and yielding to their desire, the selectmen on November 7, 1874, record the signing of a petition to the Governor for a license to form
George T. Sampson (search for this): chapter 7
ey had their seasons of gayety and pleasure like other organizations, firemen, military and civic. It is unfortunate that no files of the Medford Journal or the Chronicle are to be found, as these covered the time of the company's history, but a few references to the latter's functions are found in the first volume of the Mercury. In those former papers were accounts of things then transpiring of interest to Medford people of today. In 1876 Edwin C. Burbank was in command, in 1878 George T. Sampson, and in 1880 Julian D'Este. On September 17, 1880, the battery appeared in the third division of the great procession at Boston's two hundred and fiftieth anniversary. We have been told that on that, or some similar occasion, its remarkably fine appearance was noted by someone on the reviewing stand, or by the State authorities, who are said to have ordered its dissolution. Certain it is that in September of the next year the battery fired minute guns on Medford common on the occa
Charles Russell (search for this): chapter 7
$100 for a salute on the Fourth of July, $8.90 for cleaning guns, and $15 to Uncle David Simpson for meals for the battery men. And now appears a citizen, Charles Russell by name, and others who urged the formation of an artillery company to take charge of the Swallow battery and use it in accordance with the intent of the donoas nothing more appears of record until April 5, 1875, when it was voted that the Magoun battery be housed in the building of S. H. Pearce & Co. The next week Captain Russell appeared again, asking for authority to procure a place of storage for a few weeks. An appropriation of $850 had been made to purchase equipments for the gunome of the East Medford people asked for a share of the noise, and as the western section wanted more on July 5, the selectmen settled the matter by directing Captain Russell to fire with both guns at the center. The guns and equipment were housed somewhere temporarily until late in the year, when a building was erected for the
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