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Powderhouse Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the hill is but a short distance from Medford square. The extreme southerly portion thereof, that centers where the old high schoolhouse is situated, formed the bank of the river. From this point, where the width of the granite formation was quite narrow, the rock extended down under the river, to reappear on George street, opposite the Lorin L. Dame schoolhouse. Its next and last appearance in Medford is in a field south of, and adjoining the estate of the late George L. Stearns. Powder House hill, in the city of Somerville, is of the same formation. When the Metropolitan sewer was constructed, this granite ledge was found in the excavation in High street, in front of the schoolhouse lot, very near the surface and extended down below the bottom of the excavation, which was below high-water mark. From this point of the hill that formed the bank of the river, the elevation sloped down, both east and west to the line that separated the upland from the marshland. At several place
Meeting House (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e quarry, then across Hall road to Pasture hill, or the hill pasture, as it was known in the early days of the plantation. What is called Pasture hill at the present day is the easterly portion of a hill that extends westerly to Marble or Meeting-house brook. The crest of the hill is but a short distance from Medford square. The extreme southerly portion thereof, that centers where the old high schoolhouse is situated, formed the bank of the river. From this point, where the width of the his point of the hill that formed the bank of the river, the elevation sloped down, both east and west to the line that separated the upland from the marshland. At several places it was quite abrupt. This line on the west began at Marble or Meeting-house brook near Winthrop street, and ran along in the rear of the estates that front on High street, substantially as it exists today, until it reaches St. Joseph's church lot. Then it crosses a portion of that lot just west of and adjoining the A
Pasture Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
convenience—not hill-top villas or bungalows. The Halls owned the whole of Pasture hill, but never dreamed of living up there; they left it to the kite-flying boys, rock or granite is the so-called red gravel, or, as it is sometimes called, Pasture hill gravel, Pasture hill being the place from which it was first excavated. ThePasture hill being the place from which it was first excavated. There are two elevations that have yielded most of the granite that has been quarried and the red gravel that has been excavated. Pine hill, the larger of the elevation nearly the whole distance, until a small elevation is reached just north of Pasture hill and a short distance therefrom, where there was once a granite quarry, then ture, as it was known in the early days of the plantation. What is called Pasture hill at the present day is the easterly portion of a hill that extends westerly tn to Woburn. Probably at that early day the road passed around the verge of Pasture hill, the slope of the great south bastion of the hill being quite abrupt, and a
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e gravelly beach must have extended as far as the square. It was on this slope of the hill, close to the water's edge, near the fording place, on the pathway from Salem to Mistick ford and near to the future location of the bridge, that Governor Cradock's servants selected their dwelling-place. It was an ideal spot, there being nrowth of small flags; and there are persons now living (1855) whose fathers have told them, that wild ducks were shot in that pond. We will also see the path from Salem to Mistick ford trailing over the present Salem street, fording Gravelly creek, passing along the edge of the pond in the market-place or square, and winding aroune of the hill to the landing place of the ford. This is the path travelled by Ralph Sprague and his party (two of whom were his brothers Richard and William) from Salem through the wilderness to Mistick ford, in the summer of 1628(9). They found Mr. Cradock's servants occupying a farm called Mistick, that they had planted on the e
Mystic, Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
the town says, Mr. Joseph Grinnel built a house of it in New Bedford in 1830, and told me it came round Cape Cod in a schooner. Medford red gravel was very popular. It was used on street and garden walks, both in Medford and in the surrounding cities and towns. The city of Boston used it on the walks of the Common and Public Garden. It was also used on the walks of Mount Auburn cemetery. We extract from the records of the town of Woburn the first mention of a highway from Woburn to Mystic bridge. 14th of the 7 month 1646, Edward Convers and Samuel Richardson are appointed to lay out a highway between this town and Mistick bridge being joined with some of Charlestown and some of Mistick House. [Governor Cradock's farm house in Medford square.] The record fails to give the location of the way. There is, however, but one way where the road could have been laid out, and that is substantially where it is located today. That is to say, from the square to Brooks' corner, over
Little Gravel Creek (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
lso suppose it to be low water in the river. We will see a gravel beach extending down to low-water mark, almost if not as far as the square; then on the east side of Main street the marshland extending as far as No-Man's-Friend landing, and Gravelly creek winding its crooked way through the marsh to the river. We will see in the place where the town pump formerly stood, a pond of water. Rev. Charles Brooks, in his history of Medford, says, Where the town pump now stands in the market-place t with a growth of small flags; and there are persons now living (1855) whose fathers have told them, that wild ducks were shot in that pond. We will also see the path from Salem to Mistick ford trailing over the present Salem street, fording Gravelly creek, passing along the edge of the pond in the market-place or square, and winding around the verge of the hill to the landing place of the ford. This is the path travelled by Ralph Sprague and his party (two of whom were his brothers Richard an
Cape Cod (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
om this portion of the hill. This quarry was but little used for many years prior to the hill being laid out into building lots. The Pine hill district contained the largest masses of granite, and was the probable source of most of the split granite, both cut and uncut, so extensively used for building purposes in this vicinity. Medford granite was much in demand. A former resident of the town says, Mr. Joseph Grinnel built a house of it in New Bedford in 1830, and told me it came round Cape Cod in a schooner. Medford red gravel was very popular. It was used on street and garden walks, both in Medford and in the surrounding cities and towns. The city of Boston used it on the walks of the Common and Public Garden. It was also used on the walks of Mount Auburn cemetery. We extract from the records of the town of Woburn the first mention of a highway from Woburn to Mystic bridge. 14th of the 7 month 1646, Edward Convers and Samuel Richardson are appointed to lay out a highway
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
e Ford at Mistick, and venture the opinion that the bulky red nose will be located by the reading of the present paper. editor. BEGINNING in the northerly part of the city of Medford, near the boundary line between said city and the town of Stoneham, and running in a southwesterly direction in a slightly curved line, is a ledge of darkcolored rock, strongly impregnated with iron, which is familiarly known as Medford granite. In its course across the city there are several places elevated am which it was first excavated. There are two elevations that have yielded most of the granite that has been quarried and the red gravel that has been excavated. Pine hill, the larger of the elevations, is the point spoken of as being near the Stoneham line. It is supposed to take its name from the pine trees that grew upon it. This hill and the surrounding district furnished a large amount of stone and gravel in former years. The last stone quarried there was used in the construction of Cra
ay out a highway between this town and Mistick bridge being joined with some of Charlestown and some of Mistick House. [Governor Cradock's farm house in Medford square.] The record fails to give the location of the way. There is, however, but one way where the road could have been laid out, and that is substantially where it is located today. That is to say, from the square to Brooks' corner, over or near the present location of High street, then over Woburn and old Purchase streets to Symmes' corner, and so on to Woburn. Probably at that early day the road passed around the verge of Pasture hill, the slope of the great south bastion of the hill being quite abrupt, and at that time probably but little grading was done. The early settlers were content with most any kind of a road if it was passable. That no record ever existed is manifest by the repeated laying out of the way. High street from the square to Brooks' corner was known as the road to Woburn, until it received it
Matthew Cradock (search for this): chapter 7
of the hill, close to the water's edge, near the fording place, on the pathway from Salem to Mistick ford and near to the future location of the bridge, that Governor Cradock's servants selected their dwelling-place. It was an ideal spot, there being no other location from Wilson's farm to the Wears, taking all things into considprague and his party (two of whom were his brothers Richard and William) from Salem through the wilderness to Mistick ford, in the summer of 1628(9). They found Mr. Cradock's servants occupying a farm called Mistick, that they had planted on the east side of the river called Mistick. It is almost certain that this path was an Indi Samuel Richardson are appointed to lay out a highway between this town and Mistick bridge being joined with some of Charlestown and some of Mistick House. [Governor Cradock's farm house in Medford square.] The record fails to give the location of the way. There is, however, but one way where the road could have been laid out
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