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Pittsfield (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
he following:— I could never have suspected that my quotation from the Boston Transcript would be construed to reflect upon the good people of Medford. I was emphasizing the contrast between the good old times of that period, and the sober new times of today when distilleries are made into garages. The above was accompanied by the more than column article, from which this rum, lemon and sugar quotation was taken. In that article, Beverly, Danvers, Dunstable, Medford, Northampton, Pittsfield and Windsor are alluded to under the title of The Puritanic Present, and the writer thereof credited practically the whole to Bonfort's Wine and Spirit Circular. As the Vermont historian gives his quotation from the Transcript and not from Mr. Brooks, we are led to infer that he may not have read the latter. But evidently some other had, and none too carefully, and as her own peculiar product was famous, Medford got all that was coming to her. We have in years past heard people in the ca
St. Johnsbury (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
of the local meetinghouse, and to the contract for the framing and raising of the same for 180 in wheat at the current price; and closes with these words. Ten gallons of rum to be allowed exclusive of above price. It also records the balancing of Zibe Tute on his head at the end of the ridgepole, swallowing the contents of his flask and descending head downwards to the ground. Next follows the Medford myth we refer to. note .—Ten gallons of rum for building a meetinghouse in St. Johnsbury may be considered a modest allowance; for a similar job in Medford it took five barrels of rum, one barrel of good brown sugar, a case of lemons and two loaves of white sugar. Medford we infer, could afford to be liberal with her own peculiar product. While we have no doubt that the peculiar product was here used to make the tackle run smoothly on that occasion, we feel that the historian of that Vermont town owes it to Medford to furnish documentary evidence of the correctness of
Dunstable, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
ived from the author alluded to the following:— I could never have suspected that my quotation from the Boston Transcript would be construed to reflect upon the good people of Medford. I was emphasizing the contrast between the good old times of that period, and the sober new times of today when distilleries are made into garages. The above was accompanied by the more than column article, from which this rum, lemon and sugar quotation was taken. In that article, Beverly, Danvers, Dunstable, Medford, Northampton, Pittsfield and Windsor are alluded to under the title of The Puritanic Present, and the writer thereof credited practically the whole to Bonfort's Wine and Spirit Circular. As the Vermont historian gives his quotation from the Transcript and not from Mr. Brooks, we are led to infer that he may not have read the latter. But evidently some other had, and none too carefully, and as her own peculiar product was famous, Medford got all that was coming to her. We have in
Windsor (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
I could never have suspected that my quotation from the Boston Transcript would be construed to reflect upon the good people of Medford. I was emphasizing the contrast between the good old times of that period, and the sober new times of today when distilleries are made into garages. The above was accompanied by the more than column article, from which this rum, lemon and sugar quotation was taken. In that article, Beverly, Danvers, Dunstable, Medford, Northampton, Pittsfield and Windsor are alluded to under the title of The Puritanic Present, and the writer thereof credited practically the whole to Bonfort's Wine and Spirit Circular. As the Vermont historian gives his quotation from the Transcript and not from Mr. Brooks, we are led to infer that he may not have read the latter. But evidently some other had, and none too carefully, and as her own peculiar product was famous, Medford got all that was coming to her. We have in years past heard people in the cars of norther
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
we refer to. note .—Ten gallons of rum for building a meetinghouse in St. Johnsbury may be considered a modest allowance; for a similar job in Medford it took five barrels of rum, one barrel of good brown sugar, a case of lemons and two loaves of white sugar. Medford we infer, could afford to be liberal with her own peculiar product. While we have no doubt that the peculiar product was here used to make the tackle run smoothly on that occasion, we feel that the historian of that Vermont town owes it to Medford to furnish documentary evidence of the correctness of his statement. In writing of the raising of the meeting-house in Medford (July 26 to 27, 1769) our historian says: there was no one hurt. Our fathers did not put themselves into that condition that invites catastrophies. and quotes from authentic record of another town (four years later) practically the above invoice, and adds, A natural consequence followed—two-thirds of the frame fell: many were hu
Danvers (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
have received from the author alluded to the following:— I could never have suspected that my quotation from the Boston Transcript would be construed to reflect upon the good people of Medford. I was emphasizing the contrast between the good old times of that period, and the sober new times of today when distilleries are made into garages. The above was accompanied by the more than column article, from which this rum, lemon and sugar quotation was taken. In that article, Beverly, Danvers, Dunstable, Medford, Northampton, Pittsfield and Windsor are alluded to under the title of The Puritanic Present, and the writer thereof credited practically the whole to Bonfort's Wine and Spirit Circular. As the Vermont historian gives his quotation from the Transcript and not from Mr. Brooks, we are led to infer that he may not have read the latter. But evidently some other had, and none too carefully, and as her own peculiar product was famous, Medford got all that was coming to her.
Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 32
alluded to the following:— I could never have suspected that my quotation from the Boston Transcript would be construed to reflect upon the good people of Medford. I was emphasizing the contrast between the good old times of that period, and the sober new times of today when distilleries are made into garages. The above was accompanied by the more than column article, from which this rum, lemon and sugar quotation was taken. In that article, Beverly, Danvers, Dunstable, Medford, Northampton, Pittsfield and Windsor are alluded to under the title of The Puritanic Present, and the writer thereof credited practically the whole to Bonfort's Wine and Spirit Circular. As the Vermont historian gives his quotation from the Transcript and not from Mr. Brooks, we are led to infer that he may not have read the latter. But evidently some other had, and none too carefully, and as her own peculiar product was famous, Medford got all that was coming to her. We have in years past heard peo
Charles Brooks (search for this): chapter 32
es of today when distilleries are made into garages. The above was accompanied by the more than column article, from which this rum, lemon and sugar quotation was taken. In that article, Beverly, Danvers, Dunstable, Medford, Northampton, Pittsfield and Windsor are alluded to under the title of The Puritanic Present, and the writer thereof credited practically the whole to Bonfort's Wine and Spirit Circular. As the Vermont historian gives his quotation from the Transcript and not from Mr. Brooks, we are led to infer that he may not have read the latter. But evidently some other had, and none too carefully, and as her own peculiar product was famous, Medford got all that was coming to her. We have in years past heard people in the cars of northern trains stopping at West Medford, at the conductor's call of Medford—West Medford, remark, This is where they make Medford rum, isn't it? But until it can be verified by credible evidence that such fatality as is named really occurred
five barrels of rum, one barrel of good brown sugar, a case of lemons and two loaves of white sugar. Medford we infer, could afford to be liberal with her own peculiar product. While we have no doubt that the peculiar product was here used to make the tackle run smoothly on that occasion, we feel that the historian of that Vermont town owes it to Medford to furnish documentary evidence of the correctness of his statement. In writing of the raising of the meeting-house in Medford (July 26 to 27, 1769) our historian says: there was no one hurt. Our fathers did not put themselves into that condition that invites catastrophies. and quotes from authentic record of another town (four years later) practically the above invoice, and adds, A natural consequence followed—two-thirds of the frame fell: many were hurt, and some fatally. We have searched in vain for authentic record to verify the Vermont historian's fling at old Medford, published by his town. We commend
of rum, one barrel of good brown sugar, a case of lemons and two loaves of white sugar. Medford we infer, could afford to be liberal with her own peculiar product. While we have no doubt that the peculiar product was here used to make the tackle run smoothly on that occasion, we feel that the historian of that Vermont town owes it to Medford to furnish documentary evidence of the correctness of his statement. In writing of the raising of the meeting-house in Medford (July 26 to 27, 1769) our historian says: there was no one hurt. Our fathers did not put themselves into that condition that invites catastrophies. and quotes from authentic record of another town (four years later) practically the above invoice, and adds, A natural consequence followed—two-thirds of the frame fell: many were hurt, and some fatally. We have searched in vain for authentic record to verify the Vermont historian's fling at old Medford, published by his town. We commend a more careful