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Gibralter (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Munroe, and in a short time we all stood without effects on a friendly deck. Thence they proceeded to Hong Kong. For the rescue Captain Munroe received from President Fillmore a gold chronometer. We have had an interesting interview with Captain Hinckley, who though well nigh a nonagenarian, is still actively engaged in the insurance business in Boston, and who followed the seas for several years after the loss of the Living Age. His voyages were to St. John, N. B.; London; Antwerp; Gibraltar; Malaga; and to Batavia, Java, the latter with a cargo of ice for Frederick Tudor. It is somewhat remarkable that these were also made in four Medford-built vessels, the Cygnet, Horsburgh, Vancouver, and /osiah Quincy. The N. B. Palmer, in which he returned after the wreck of the Living Age was not here built. Captain Hinckley modestly disclaims the title, and says it was hard to say no to the offer of the ship owners of a captain's position, pay and privilege, having served thus temp
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
o, and lowered a boat, but to the astonishment of the shipwrecked party the boat after nearing them turned about and returned to the strange ship, which then filled away and disappeared to the south. The men of the Living Age did not discover until they were rescued later that the reason for this strange action was that the ship had struck a shoal in approaching them and punched a hole in her bottom, and that, fearing lest the five hundred Chinese coolies on board whom she was carrying to California would in terror at her leaking condition seize the ship if he sent part of his crew away to rescue the shipwrecked party, the ship's captain had decided to make all sail for Manila for repairs and report the discovery of the crew of the Living Age. On the thirty-fifth day after the wreck, a Chinese sampan was sighted by the part of the ship's company which had remained on the Living Age and in it were Mr. Campbell and his men. The adventures of the crew were related, and on February 6 a
St. John (Canada) (search for this): chapter 1
(English) from Manila, Captain Munroe, and in a short time we all stood without effects on a friendly deck. Thence they proceeded to Hong Kong. For the rescue Captain Munroe received from President Fillmore a gold chronometer. We have had an interesting interview with Captain Hinckley, who though well nigh a nonagenarian, is still actively engaged in the insurance business in Boston, and who followed the seas for several years after the loss of the Living Age. His voyages were to St. John, N. B.; London; Antwerp; Gibraltar; Malaga; and to Batavia, Java, the latter with a cargo of ice for Frederick Tudor. It is somewhat remarkable that these were also made in four Medford-built vessels, the Cygnet, Horsburgh, Vancouver, and /osiah Quincy. The N. B. Palmer, in which he returned after the wreck of the Living Age was not here built. Captain Hinckley modestly disclaims the title, and says it was hard to say no to the offer of the ship owners of a captain's position, pay and priv
Mystic River (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
Old Shipping days. The Register has noted the last Medford-built ship, the Pilgrim. As none are now afloat it would be interesting to know of their style of build, kind, and time of service, and their final fate. The age of the Pilgrim was less than nineteen years. Her cargo, when wrecked, coal. All hands escaped. We have never seen any account of the fate of any other of the long list (567) of those built along the banks of the Mystic until within a few days of present writing, when there came to us the recent brochure of the State Street Trust Company of Boston, styled Old Shipping Days. In this we find the story of the wreck of the Living Age, which by the courtesy and permission of said Trust Company we present. In 1846 the Rev. A. R. Baker (then twelve years pastor of the Second, or First Trinitarian, Congregational Church)preached a sermon onship-building,and appended a register of vessels built in Medford, which then numbered 359. Mr. Baker is certainly to be commen
Hong Kong (China) (search for this): chapter 1
hoisted all our signals and launched a boat to intercept her. To our unspeakable relief the spars and smokestack of a steamer loomed up, and she shortly after came to anchor near the shore, lowering her largest boat, the officer of which on hearing my story directed our boat to go aboard, while he went ashore for the remainder. The steamer was the Shanghai (English) from Manila, Captain Munroe, and in a short time we all stood without effects on a friendly deck. Thence they proceeded to Hong Kong. For the rescue Captain Munroe received from President Fillmore a gold chronometer. We have had an interesting interview with Captain Hinckley, who though well nigh a nonagenarian, is still actively engaged in the insurance business in Boston, and who followed the seas for several years after the loss of the Living Age. His voyages were to St. John, N. B.; London; Antwerp; Gibraltar; Malaga; and to Batavia, Java, the latter with a cargo of ice for Frederick Tudor. It is somewhat rema
Malaga (Spain) (search for this): chapter 1
and in a short time we all stood without effects on a friendly deck. Thence they proceeded to Hong Kong. For the rescue Captain Munroe received from President Fillmore a gold chronometer. We have had an interesting interview with Captain Hinckley, who though well nigh a nonagenarian, is still actively engaged in the insurance business in Boston, and who followed the seas for several years after the loss of the Living Age. His voyages were to St. John, N. B.; London; Antwerp; Gibraltar; Malaga; and to Batavia, Java, the latter with a cargo of ice for Frederick Tudor. It is somewhat remarkable that these were also made in four Medford-built vessels, the Cygnet, Horsburgh, Vancouver, and /osiah Quincy. The N. B. Palmer, in which he returned after the wreck of the Living Age was not here built. Captain Hinckley modestly disclaims the title, and says it was hard to say no to the offer of the ship owners of a captain's position, pay and privilege, having served thus temporarily in
Batavia, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ime we all stood without effects on a friendly deck. Thence they proceeded to Hong Kong. For the rescue Captain Munroe received from President Fillmore a gold chronometer. We have had an interesting interview with Captain Hinckley, who though well nigh a nonagenarian, is still actively engaged in the insurance business in Boston, and who followed the seas for several years after the loss of the Living Age. His voyages were to St. John, N. B.; London; Antwerp; Gibraltar; Malaga; and to Batavia, Java, the latter with a cargo of ice for Frederick Tudor. It is somewhat remarkable that these were also made in four Medford-built vessels, the Cygnet, Horsburgh, Vancouver, and /osiah Quincy. The N. B. Palmer, in which he returned after the wreck of the Living Age was not here built. Captain Hinckley modestly disclaims the title, and says it was hard to say no to the offer of the ship owners of a captain's position, pay and privilege, having served thus temporarily in those his yout
Kossuth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ked Captain Hinckley. Yes, said he, and handed her his own box from a shelf above his head. Mrs. Holmes, as calmly as if she had been in her own sittingroom, selected from the box needles and thread, which she carefully tucked away in the pockets of her coat. All the while the ship was lurching fearfully and pounding against the coral reef. You don't happen to have an extra hat? asked Mrs. Holmes. Captain Hinckley handed her a Louis Kossuth hat, which had become famous after Kossuth's visit to this country. Taking a pair of scissors, she coolly and quickly cut off her hair close to her head, tried on the hat, and secured it under her chin with a tape fastened with safety pins. There, don't I look like a boy? she asked jokingly, and went calmly on deck in the midst of the uproar and confusion. Mrs. Holmes' manner was never other than brave throughout the fearful days that followed. Where men who had followed the sea for years were frightened, she herself show
China (China) (search for this): chapter 1
ne day they sighted a ship. She approached, hove to, and lowered a boat, but to the astonishment of the shipwrecked party the boat after nearing them turned about and returned to the strange ship, which then filled away and disappeared to the south. The men of the Living Age did not discover until they were rescued later that the reason for this strange action was that the ship had struck a shoal in approaching them and punched a hole in her bottom, and that, fearing lest the five hundred Chinese coolies on board whom she was carrying to California would in terror at her leaking condition seize the ship if he sent part of his crew away to rescue the shipwrecked party, the ship's captain had decided to make all sail for Manila for repairs and report the discovery of the crew of the Living Age. On the thirty-fifth day after the wreck, a Chinese sampan was sighted by the part of the ship's company which had remained on the Living Age and in it were Mr. Campbell and his men. The adve
Shanghai (China) (search for this): chapter 1
t last at dawn of February 25th, adds Captain Hinckley, I espied on the horizon a column of black smoke; a whaler or steamer it seemed to be. We hoisted all our signals and launched a boat to intercept her. To our unspeakable relief the spars and smokestack of a steamer loomed up, and she shortly after came to anchor near the shore, lowering her largest boat, the officer of which on hearing my story directed our boat to go aboard, while he went ashore for the remainder. The steamer was the Shanghai (English) from Manila, Captain Munroe, and in a short time we all stood without effects on a friendly deck. Thence they proceeded to Hong Kong. For the rescue Captain Munroe received from President Fillmore a gold chronometer. We have had an interesting interview with Captain Hinckley, who though well nigh a nonagenarian, is still actively engaged in the insurance business in Boston, and who followed the seas for several years after the loss of the Living Age. His voyages were to St.
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