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North River (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
Ship Yard Echoes. In the Usher History of Medford are some Biographical Sketches, closing with that of Captain Joshua T. Foster (p. 487). Inasmuch as twenty-one years of the captain's career are unnoticed there some items from Shipbuilding on North River are worth recalling. Turner Foster, as he was commonly called in his boyhood home, having acquired his trade in Medford and there attained his majority, returned to Scituate and built four vessels in partnership with Joseph Clapp under the firm name of Clapp & Foster. . . . [Having] reached his twenty-fifth year [he] returned to the Sprague & James yard as foreman. . . . Before [leaving] Scituate the first time he used to help his father in the store, and often carried the black-strap (rum sweetened with molasses) down to the yards, but during the seventy-eight years of his life [1889], has never used tobacco or tasted spirit, save as a medicine. He used to play the clarinet and with Uncle Sam Rogers, went to singing sc
Pembroke (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 23
name of Clapp & Foster. . . . [Having] reached his twenty-fifth year [he] returned to the Sprague & James yard as foreman. . . . Before [leaving] Scituate the first time he used to help his father in the store, and often carried the black-strap (rum sweetened with molasses) down to the yards, but during the seventy-eight years of his life [1889], has never used tobacco or tasted spirit, save as a medicine. He used to play the clarinet and with Uncle Sam Rogers, went to singing school in Pembroke. At that time Mr. Rogers was courting a Miss Standish, and Mr. Foster was obliged to wait for him to go to her home and do his courting, as Mr. Rogers had the team and it was a long walk. . . An epitaph current with the [Scituate shipyard] reads as follows. Under this greensward pat, Lies the hulk of old. . . . . . . . . Shepherds rejoice and do not weep, For he is dead who stole your sheep. The deceased was noted for putting other men's sheep in his own flock and marking them with his
ty-eight years of his life [1889], has never used tobacco or tasted spirit, save as a medicine. He used to play the clarinet and with Uncle Sam Rogers, went to singing school in Pembroke. At that time Mr. Rogers was courting a Miss Standish, and Mr. Foster was obliged to wait for him to go to her home and do his courting, as Mr. Rogers had the team and it was a long walk. . . An epitaph current with the [Scituate shipyard] reads as follows. Under this greensward pat, Lies the hulk of old. . . . . . . . . Shepherds rejoice and do not weep, For he is dead who stole your sheep. The deceased was noted for putting other men's sheep in his own flock and marking them with his private mark. We have no proof of the identity of the writer but the lines are not inconsistent with Mr. Foster's jovial disposition. From the same source we find what Mr. Usher failed to mention, that while serving Medford in 1884 Captain Foster was the oldest man in the Legislature—the Dean of the House.
Joseph Clapp (search for this): chapter 23
ding on North River are worth recalling. Turner Foster, as he was commonly called in his boyhood home, having acquired his trade in Medford and there attained his majority, returned to Scituate and built four vessels in partnership with Joseph Clapp under the firm name of Clapp & Foster. . . . [Having] reached his twenty-fifth year [he] returned to the Sprague & James yard as foreman. . . . Before [leaving] Scituate the first time he used to help his father in the store, and often carriClapp & Foster. . . . [Having] reached his twenty-fifth year [he] returned to the Sprague & James yard as foreman. . . . Before [leaving] Scituate the first time he used to help his father in the store, and often carried the black-strap (rum sweetened with molasses) down to the yards, but during the seventy-eight years of his life [1889], has never used tobacco or tasted spirit, save as a medicine. He used to play the clarinet and with Uncle Sam Rogers, went to singing school in Pembroke. At that time Mr. Rogers was courting a Miss Standish, and Mr. Foster was obliged to wait for him to go to her home and do his courting, as Mr. Rogers had the team and it was a long walk. . . An epitaph current with the [S
Joshua T. Foster (search for this): chapter 23
Ship Yard Echoes. In the Usher History of Medford are some Biographical Sketches, closing with that of Captain Joshua T. Foster (p. 487). Inasmuch as twenty-one years of the captain's career are unnoticed there some items from Shipbuilding on North River are worth recalling. Turner Foster, as he was commonly called in his boyhood home, having acquired his trade in Medford and there attained his majority, returned to Scituate and built four vessels in partnership with Joseph Clapp under the firm name of Clapp & Foster. . . . [Having] reached his twenty-fifth year [he] returned to the Sprague & James yard as foreman. . . . Before [leaving] Scituate the first time he used to help his father in the store, and often carried the black-strap (rum sweetened with molasses) down to the yards, but during the seventy-eight years of his life [1889], has never used tobacco or tasted spirit, save as a medicine. He used to play the clarinet and with Uncle Sam Rogers, went to singing sch
Turner Foster (search for this): chapter 23
reer are unnoticed there some items from Shipbuilding on North River are worth recalling. Turner Foster, as he was commonly called in his boyhood home, having acquired his trade in Medford and thetuate and built four vessels in partnership with Joseph Clapp under the firm name of Clapp & Foster. . . . [Having] reached his twenty-fifth year [he] returned to the Sprague & James yard as foremwent to singing school in Pembroke. At that time Mr. Rogers was courting a Miss Standish, and Mr. Foster was obliged to wait for him to go to her home and do his courting, as Mr. Rogers had the team ark. We have no proof of the identity of the writer but the lines are not inconsistent with Mr. Foster's jovial disposition. From the same source we find what Mr. Usher failed to mention, that jovial disposition. From the same source we find what Mr. Usher failed to mention, that while serving Medford in 1884 Captain Foster was the oldest man in the Legislature—the Dean of the House.
wenty-fifth year [he] returned to the Sprague & James yard as foreman. . . . Before [leaving] Scituate the first time he used to help his father in the store, and often carried the black-strap (rum sweetened with molasses) down to the yards, but during the seventy-eight years of his life [1889], has never used tobacco or tasted spirit, save as a medicine. He used to play the clarinet and with Uncle Sam Rogers, went to singing school in Pembroke. At that time Mr. Rogers was courting a Miss Standish, and Mr. Foster was obliged to wait for him to go to her home and do his courting, as Mr. Rogers had the team and it was a long walk. . . An epitaph current with the [Scituate shipyard] reads as follows. Under this greensward pat, Lies the hulk of old. . . . . . . . . Shepherds rejoice and do not weep, For he is dead who stole your sheep. The deceased was noted for putting other men's sheep in his own flock and marking them with his private mark. We have no proof of the identity of
Sam Rogers (search for this): chapter 23
s, but during the seventy-eight years of his life [1889], has never used tobacco or tasted spirit, save as a medicine. He used to play the clarinet and with Uncle Sam Rogers, went to singing school in Pembroke. At that time Mr. Rogers was courting a Miss Standish, and Mr. Foster was obliged to wait for him to go to her home and Mr. Rogers was courting a Miss Standish, and Mr. Foster was obliged to wait for him to go to her home and do his courting, as Mr. Rogers had the team and it was a long walk. . . An epitaph current with the [Scituate shipyard] reads as follows. Under this greensward pat, Lies the hulk of old. . . . . . . . . Shepherds rejoice and do not weep, For he is dead who stole your sheep. The deceased was noted for putting other men's sheep iMr. Rogers had the team and it was a long walk. . . An epitaph current with the [Scituate shipyard] reads as follows. Under this greensward pat, Lies the hulk of old. . . . . . . . . Shepherds rejoice and do not weep, For he is dead who stole your sheep. The deceased was noted for putting other men's sheep in his own flock and marking them with his private mark. We have no proof of the identity of the writer but the lines are not inconsistent with Mr. Foster's jovial disposition. From the same source we find what Mr. Usher failed to mention, that while serving Medford in 1884 Captain Foster was the oldest man in the Legislatur
red his trade in Medford and there attained his majority, returned to Scituate and built four vessels in partnership with Joseph Clapp under the firm name of Clapp & Foster. . . . [Having] reached his twenty-fifth year [he] returned to the Sprague & James yard as foreman. . . . Before [leaving] Scituate the first time he used to help his father in the store, and often carried the black-strap (rum sweetened with molasses) down to the yards, but during the seventy-eight years of his life [1889], has never used tobacco or tasted spirit, save as a medicine. He used to play the clarinet and with Uncle Sam Rogers, went to singing school in Pembroke. At that time Mr. Rogers was courting a Miss Standish, and Mr. Foster was obliged to wait for him to go to her home and do his courting, as Mr. Rogers had the team and it was a long walk. . . An epitaph current with the [Scituate shipyard] reads as follows. Under this greensward pat, Lies the hulk of old. . . . . . . . . Shepherds rejoi
nty-eight years of his life [1889], has never used tobacco or tasted spirit, save as a medicine. He used to play the clarinet and with Uncle Sam Rogers, went to singing school in Pembroke. At that time Mr. Rogers was courting a Miss Standish, and Mr. Foster was obliged to wait for him to go to her home and do his courting, as Mr. Rogers had the team and it was a long walk. . . An epitaph current with the [Scituate shipyard] reads as follows. Under this greensward pat, Lies the hulk of old. . . . . . . . . Shepherds rejoice and do not weep, For he is dead who stole your sheep. The deceased was noted for putting other men's sheep in his own flock and marking them with his private mark. We have no proof of the identity of the writer but the lines are not inconsistent with Mr. Foster's jovial disposition. From the same source we find what Mr. Usher failed to mention, that while serving Medford in 1884 Captain Foster was the oldest man in the Legislature—the Dean of the House.