hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Sprague 35 1 Browse Search
Ebenezer Turell 30 0 Browse Search
Henry Putnam 29 1 Browse Search
Matthew Ellis 28 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 26 0 Browse Search
Charlestowne (South Carolina, United States) 22 0 Browse Search
Mike Martin 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Gleason 18 0 Browse Search
Katherine H. Stone 18 0 Browse Search
Paul Revere 18 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24.. Search the whole document.

Found 53 total hits in 45 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Cuba (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 6
tion, but their disabilities increasing by advancing years, the present arrangement has obtained. It speaks ill and looks badly for our boasted civic pride, and worse for our patriotic spirit, that even reinforced by the affiliated organizations and the city government, the not overlarge Mystic church is far from being filled on the occasion. It should be crowded. We remember the influence of this great Grand Army, and how in ‘98, South as well as North rallied under the one old flag for Cuba libre, and again overseas for the world's safety, which includes our own national life and preservation. As reconstruction days followed our civil war, re-adjustment is following, all too slowly it may seem, the recent titanic struggle for world dominion. The danger is not past. What shall be the outcome? As in ‘61 the foe was of our own household, so today America has need to beware lest the government of the people, by the people and for the people be weakened and assailed by race preju
Appomattox (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Memorial day. SIXTY years have passed since our nation's foes of its own household lifted treasonable hands for its destruction. Of the uprising for its defence we know. Ere a week had passed Medford men had rallied in response to the President's call and were on their way to the capital. They were in service first for three months, then for three years or the war, and still others, for rebellion widened into war on gigantic scale. Four years the contest raged; then came the day of Appomattox. The government of the people, by the people and for the people, though assured, was to experience the difficult and dangerous period of reconstruction. After four years of absence, the national flag was restored to Sumter's battlements; but two days later, the bullet of treason robbed the nation of its executive head and added to the gravity of the situation. Placed in the chair of state by a terrible tragedy, the new executive betrayed his high trust and made treason. . . a crime befo
Oak Grove (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
orized to perform all acts necessary to the ends of the organization. Primarily a soldiers' fraternity, it at once became an institution of loyalty to the government and a school of patriotism, a mighty reserve force. Its name was well and fitly chosen, a Grand Army. For fifty-three years Post 66, numbering in all upwards of four hundred, have here maintained the patriotic purpose of the organization. Fifty-two times their memorial services have been performed within the precincts of Oak Grove and the older burial places, and the comrades have reverently placed their country's flag and floral tribute over the sleeping dust of an ever increasing number. Retracing their steps through the shaded avenues and paths of the silent city, the last volley is fired. Its echoes ceased, Taps are sounded by the musicians, and as in benediction the cadences die away, the veterans resume the homeward march. Who, that has ever witnessed the scene, can wonder that though first called Decoratio
Benjamin P. Lewis (search for this): chapter 6
the past year , twelve—three in one recent week—have answered the last call, leaving but thirty-seven names on the roll. But one of these appears on the charter, by coincidence, the last. Twenty-four, an equivalent of its resident membership, as follows, Charles O. Burbank John L. Brockway James H. Burpee John E. Barrows A. D. Chickering Nason B. Cunningham G. A. Delesdernier Thos. F. Dwyer W. F. Elsbree Willard B. Emery Isaac H. Gardner Edgar A. Hall Winslow Joyce Benjamin P. Lewis Charles W. Libby Albert Mason Albert Patch Alvin R. Reed Milton F. Roberts George K. Russell Albert A. Samson Edward F. Smith George L. Stokell Albert G. Webb were in the ranks and followed the colors this year to honor those gone before. Though their ranks are thinning, their forms less erect and tread less firm, their loyalty to flag and country is true. That about a dozen is the average attendance at the fortnightly meeting is evidence of their interest, and though t
John L. Brockway (search for this): chapter 6
Had occasion arisen, the Grand Army men would, to call, have answered Here! After reaching its high tide of membership, it was inevitable that its numbers must decrease. It has no recruiting office. During the past year , twelve—three in one recent week—have answered the last call, leaving but thirty-seven names on the roll. But one of these appears on the charter, by coincidence, the last. Twenty-four, an equivalent of its resident membership, as follows, Charles O. Burbank John L. Brockway James H. Burpee John E. Barrows A. D. Chickering Nason B. Cunningham G. A. Delesdernier Thos. F. Dwyer W. F. Elsbree Willard B. Emery Isaac H. Gardner Edgar A. Hall Winslow Joyce Benjamin P. Lewis Charles W. Libby Albert Mason Albert Patch Alvin R. Reed Milton F. Roberts George K. Russell Albert A. Samson Edward F. Smith George L. Stokell Albert G. Webb were in the ranks and followed the colors this year to honor those gone before. Though their ranks are thi
Thomas H. Gillard (search for this): chapter 6
oon became national in extent. On August 21, 1868, the charter of the Medford Post was issued by the Grand Commander of the Department of Massachusetts. Its wording is, To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting. Know ye, That, reposing full confidence in the fidelity and patriotism of Comrades: Godfrey Ryder, Jr., Samuel C. Lawrence, Alfred Stephens, Henry H. D. Cushing, Silas F. Wild, Chris Plunkett, Elbridge B. Hartshorn, James A. Hervey, Samuel G. Jepson, John Hutchins, Thomas H. Gillard, J. H. Whitney, Charles H. Prentiss, Robert Ellis, Alvin R. Reed, they and their associates and successors are constituted a Post of the Grand Army of the Republic known as S. C. Lawrence Post, Number 66, and authorized to perform all acts necessary to the ends of the organization. Primarily a soldiers' fraternity, it at once became an institution of loyalty to the government and a school of patriotism, a mighty reserve force. Its name was well and fitly chosen, a Grand Army. For
Nason B. Cunningham (search for this): chapter 6
re! After reaching its high tide of membership, it was inevitable that its numbers must decrease. It has no recruiting office. During the past year , twelve—three in one recent week—have answered the last call, leaving but thirty-seven names on the roll. But one of these appears on the charter, by coincidence, the last. Twenty-four, an equivalent of its resident membership, as follows, Charles O. Burbank John L. Brockway James H. Burpee John E. Barrows A. D. Chickering Nason B. Cunningham G. A. Delesdernier Thos. F. Dwyer W. F. Elsbree Willard B. Emery Isaac H. Gardner Edgar A. Hall Winslow Joyce Benjamin P. Lewis Charles W. Libby Albert Mason Albert Patch Alvin R. Reed Milton F. Roberts George K. Russell Albert A. Samson Edward F. Smith George L. Stokell Albert G. Webb were in the ranks and followed the colors this year to honor those gone before. Though their ranks are thinning, their forms less erect and tread less firm, their loyalty to fla
Charles O. Burbank (search for this): chapter 6
ce was misplaced. Had occasion arisen, the Grand Army men would, to call, have answered Here! After reaching its high tide of membership, it was inevitable that its numbers must decrease. It has no recruiting office. During the past year , twelve—three in one recent week—have answered the last call, leaving but thirty-seven names on the roll. But one of these appears on the charter, by coincidence, the last. Twenty-four, an equivalent of its resident membership, as follows, Charles O. Burbank John L. Brockway James H. Burpee John E. Barrows A. D. Chickering Nason B. Cunningham G. A. Delesdernier Thos. F. Dwyer W. F. Elsbree Willard B. Emery Isaac H. Gardner Edgar A. Hall Winslow Joyce Benjamin P. Lewis Charles W. Libby Albert Mason Albert Patch Alvin R. Reed Milton F. Roberts George K. Russell Albert A. Samson Edward F. Smith George L. Stokell Albert G. Webb were in the ranks and followed the colors this year to honor those gone before. Though
Samuel C. Lawrence (search for this): chapter 6
issued by the Grand Commander of the Department of Massachusetts. Its wording is, To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting. Know ye, That, reposing full confidence in the fidelity and patriotism of Comrades: Godfrey Ryder, Jr., Samuel C. Lawrence, Alfred Stephens, Henry H. D. Cushing, Silas F. Wild, Chris Plunkett, Elbridge B. Hartshorn, James A. Hervey, Samuel G. Jepson, John Hutchins, Thomas H. Gillard, J. H. Whitney, Charles H. Prentiss, Robert Ellis, Alvin R. Reed, they and their associates and successors are constituted a Post of the Grand Army of the Republic known as S. C. Lawrence Post, Number 66, and authorized to perform all acts necessary to the ends of the organization. Primarily a soldiers' fraternity, it at once became an institution of loyalty to the government and a school of patriotism, a mighty reserve force. Its name was well and fitly chosen, a Grand Army. For fifty-three years Post 66, numbering in all upwards of four hundred, have here maintaine
J. H. Whitney (search for this): chapter 6
al in extent. On August 21, 1868, the charter of the Medford Post was issued by the Grand Commander of the Department of Massachusetts. Its wording is, To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting. Know ye, That, reposing full confidence in the fidelity and patriotism of Comrades: Godfrey Ryder, Jr., Samuel C. Lawrence, Alfred Stephens, Henry H. D. Cushing, Silas F. Wild, Chris Plunkett, Elbridge B. Hartshorn, James A. Hervey, Samuel G. Jepson, John Hutchins, Thomas H. Gillard, J. H. Whitney, Charles H. Prentiss, Robert Ellis, Alvin R. Reed, they and their associates and successors are constituted a Post of the Grand Army of the Republic known as S. C. Lawrence Post, Number 66, and authorized to perform all acts necessary to the ends of the organization. Primarily a soldiers' fraternity, it at once became an institution of loyalty to the government and a school of patriotism, a mighty reserve force. Its name was well and fitly chosen, a Grand Army. For fifty-three years
1 2 3 4 5