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Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ve (or more) years of his life was a property owner and resident in Medford, passing away in 1790. Historian Brooks, writing about midway between the time of these papers and the present day, said, How will the above read in the capital of Liberia two hundred years hence? How does it read in Medford (where rum was made) today? But the Nantucket-Boston-Medford men were not sinners above all men. There were others, as a recent publication, A Rhode Island Slaver (Shepley Library, Providence, 1922), clearly proves by reproducing the Trade book of the Sloop Adventure, 1773-4. Of Captain Peter Gwin, his various commands, voyages and doings, the letters and instructions of his assured friend and owner give much information, and are a side light on a business once considered legitimate. To continue Lack of space in our last issue precluded our saying all we desired regarding the Register. At the urgent request of the Society we begin a new volume, and with this number co
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
a tinge of romance about his marriage. A foster-sister of Mrs. Lydia Maria Child, who lived in the house corner of Ashland and Salem streets, applied to him to be taught the trade. He told her he did not care for more apprentices, but if she would promise, when through, not to set up business in Medford, he would take her. In a year they were married, he being twenty-eight years old and his wife eighteen. She was a direct descendant of Peter Tufts. . . . I will say in passing that in the Salem street burying ground, a rod or two from the monument in a southeasterly direction lies the body of George Blanchard, who died in 1700, aged eighty-one or eighty-four. He inherited from his father, Thomas, Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from England in 1639, and lived in Braintree, Mass. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, house and a farm of two hundred acres, known now as Wellington, but then belonging to Charlestown. In 172
Wellington (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
tion lies the body of George Blanchard, who died in 1700, aged eighty-one or eighty-four. He inherited from his father, Thomas, Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from England in 1639, and lived in Braintree, Mass. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, house and a farm of two hundred acres, known now as Wellington, but then belonging to Charlestown. In 1726 it was annexed to Malden and afterwards to Medford. Mr. Blanchard died at Wellington in 1654. The above is not in the history of Medford, but is from the completed records of this branch of the Blanchard family. the English emigrant, two hundred acres of land now known as Wellington. The present family is the seventh generation directly from him, and his descendants are scattered throughout the states. The name originally was Blan-card, from a French colony of weavers in France, blanc meaning white, and card, weavers, who made fine linen. . . . Mr. Aaron Blanchard
Braintree (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ess in Medford, he would take her. In a year they were married, he being twenty-eight years old and his wife eighteen. She was a direct descendant of Peter Tufts. . . . I will say in passing that in the Salem street burying ground, a rod or two from the monument in a southeasterly direction lies the body of George Blanchard, who died in 1700, aged eighty-one or eighty-four. He inherited from his father, Thomas, Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from England in 1639, and lived in Braintree, Mass. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, house and a farm of two hundred acres, known now as Wellington, but then belonging to Charlestown. In 1726 it was annexed to Malden and afterwards to Medford. Mr. Blanchard died at Wellington in 1654. The above is not in the history of Medford, but is from the completed records of this branch of the Blanchard family. the English emigrant, two hundred acres of land now known as Wellington. Th
Mystic Pond (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
westward to near Fairfield street. Something of East Arlington and West Somerville is shown beyond the Mystic—whatever came within the eye of the camera. Mr. Brooks forbore taking the other beautiful view which would have included his own home on Grove street, now utterly gone. The Brooks and Hall school houses, both now gone, Trinity's first church, the new railway station, then nearly complete, and including the old; a view on High street, one of Boston avenue and another of the lower Mystic pond and dam complete this collection. How large an edition of this work of Mr. Brooks, certainly the finest comprehensive view of Medford in detail ever published, was issued we cannot say, nor yet by what means or at whose expense. It may have been privately for his own distribution. The writer has one of those inscribed West Medford, given him some twelve years ago by one of Mr. Brooks' acquaintances, but was unaware of the existence of the Medford set until the recent acquisition of b
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ough several attempts have failed. In 1839, Barber's Historical Collection was published, the author himself making the illustrating sketches in the various Massachusetts towns he visited and described. In the Register of September, 1920, may be seen his work in portraying Medford. This view is printed from the same wood blohere else,—the Stearns mansion, the railroad stations and the second Brooks schoolhouse. The birthplace of John Brooks and his last residence when governor of Massachusetts are well shown, and some of these later views we do well to compare with the earlier for the facts they reveal. In 1881 or ‘82 Mr. Henry Brooks secured photng in our neighboring city of Malden. Rev. Edward Stuart Best, Methodist Episcopal clergyman, began his ministry in 1851, serving one year each in three western Massachusetts towns, and one in the nearer town of Swampscott. At the annual conference of his church, April, 1855, his appointment was to Medford. Prior to that time,
Shanghai (China) (search for this): chapter 1
arded it, using it from time to time, telling of its story, pondering in his own mind of its disposition and at last found a solution of his problem. After his retirement he attended the public worship at Malden center church, where Rev. Lauress J. Birney was pastor, and to whom the presence of Father Best was always helpful. While Dr. Birney was Dean of the School of Theology, Boston University, he was in 1920 elected to the Episcopacy. Before departing to his distant field of work (Shanghai, China) he called to pay his respects to the venerable brother in the ministry. While there Father Best placed in his hands the old timeworn copy of the Holy Book he had cherished for nearly sixty years. Can we imagine the bishop's feelings on receiving such a token? Probably much the same as the giver's long years before, when he received it and heard its story. John Wesley is credited with the saying, The world is my parish, but John Wesley never dreamed that after one hundred and fif
Broadway (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
The views of the so-called Cradock house and the residence of Gorham Brooks give us the oldest and most realistic portrayal; the latter is made more so by the slave-wall in front and the distant view of the old wood-burner engine and cars on the railroad, then not very old. The Edward Brooks (Peter Chardon Brooks, 1802) residence is another. Of this fine estate scarce a vestige now remains, but the view is an excellent one. The view of Walnut-tree hill was also by Rawson and made from Broadway in Somerville. But two buildings, Ballou hall and Packard hall, crown its summit, and one dwelling at the end of Professors row, for the college had but just been instituted. Beyond are the hills and spires of Malden, which then included Everett, and nearer, the winding Mystic with its broad marshes, and still nearer, Main street, with a little of the slope of Winter hill. Just where the station now stands is a railroad train, the cars very small as compared with the engine. The encir
Belfast, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
served till the larger new building was erected in 1873. But one of the witty speakers at the Levee still insisted that the Best organ was at the other end of the meeting house. When, during the Civil war, Mr. Best was stationed at Milford, Mass., an incident occurred which must have been a happy surprise to him: While making a call on one of his aged parishioners, the good lady asked of the country of his birth, and he replied, Yes, I am—or was —an Irishman, born in 1824 in Newry, near Belfast. Four of us became ministers, three Methodists, one of the Church of Engand. Then he added that he was now an American of the Americans, and happy in his work. Then she said, God bless thee, I have something for thee, and placed in his hands a little book she had long highly prized, and told its story. It was a Bible once owned and used by Reverend John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist Church. During his first visit to Ireland a young man there became interested in personal religio
Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
ld and his wife eighteen. She was a direct descendant of Peter Tufts. . . . I will say in passing that in the Salem street burying ground, a rod or two from the monument in a southeasterly direction lies the body of George Blanchard, who died in 1700, aged eighty-one or eighty-four. He inherited from his father, Thomas, Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from England in 1639, and lived in Braintree, Mass. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, house and a farm of two hundred acres, known now as Wellington, but then belonging to Charlestown. In 1726 it was annexed to Malden and afterwards to Medford. Mr. Blanchard died at Wellington in 1654. The above is not in the history of Medford, but is from the completed records of this branch of the Blanchard family. the English emigrant, two hundred acres of land now known as Wellington. The present family is the seventh generation directly from him, and his descendants are scatte
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