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Walhalla (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
nia will not act as South Carolina, I have no longer a home, and I am a banished man. [Applause.] I hope, gentlemen, that my friends will excuse me from talking any longer. But, I will say, there is not one of you, young and ardent as most of you are, that has his cause more at heart than I have, or would make greater sacrifices to secure its success. [Loud and long continued applause] The Columbia South Carolinian, speaking of the military preparations in that State, says: At Walhalla, a military company is organizing. At Pendleton, a company has been formed, styled "the Fort Hill Guards," eighty-seven strong, and Col. Walter Gwyan elected Captain. He leaves town this morning, with arms, accoutrements and uniforms for his company. A graduate of West Point, he served fourteen years in the United States Army, and in Virginia commanded in the volunteer service for eighteen years, where he had a regiment of fifteen companies. The Montgomery (Ala.) Mail says: T
Richland, Sangamon County (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 1
ersigned citizens of Madison county. Virginia, believing that South Carolina will be the first to raise the standard for States-Rights and Southern liberty, against the encroachments of Northern fanaticism and Federal tyranny, do hereby tender their services to fight under her flag whenever she shall signify her wish to receive them, unless Virginia shall first require their aid. "Nov. 8th, 1860." The nominations for the State Convention in South Carolina have commenced. In Richland and Sumpter districts the candidates nominated are "all pledged to secession." In the latter district two of them are ministers of the Gospel. The excitement in Charleston continues. The Evening News of Saturday says: The first liberty pole that has ever been raised in the city, has been inaugurated to-day, amidst the smiles of lovely women, the hearty applause of men, the firing of cannon, and the sweet strains of music. Never have we seen the countenances of all express so much j
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
ton, Friday night, Mr. Edmund Ruffin was serenaded, and replied by a speech. In speaking of North Carolina and Virginia, he said: We see North Carolina proverbially slow in joining in this causNorth Carolina proverbially slow in joining in this cause; but I fully believe she will be with you before long. If North Carolina is slow, she is sure, and when she makes a move she can be depended upon. A portion of that State, I believe, was the firstNorth Carolina is slow, she is sure, and when she makes a move she can be depended upon. A portion of that State, I believe, was the first to proclaim the separation of the then existing union with the mother country. If the citizens of North Carolina claimed, as they did, to be sons of the patriots who declared independence in 1775, aNorth Carolina claimed, as they did, to be sons of the patriots who declared independence in 1775, at Mecklenberg, and did not follow South Carolina, they would give the lie to their fathers, and show themselves spurious progeny of noble sires. [Applause] I do not believe that North Carolina will tNorth Carolina will take that position. As to Virginia, would to God I could give you a better account; but there are many reasons that do not influence you why the border States should hesitate before taking this st
Milledgeville (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Interesting from the South. The Liberty Pole at Charleston — The National Flag net Popular — Conservative Speech of Hon. A. H. Stephens at Milledgeville — The Cockade in the Pulpit, &c., &c. The following interesting news is collected from our Southern exchanges: A dispatch from Charleston to the New York Herald, dave is the following extract from a late address of Judge McGrath: "The time for deliberation has passed — the time for action has come." Great meeting at Milledgeville. There was a great and exciting assemblage Milledgeville, Ga., on Thursday night. The Mon. A. M. Stephens addressed the meeting in opposition to successionMilledgeville, Ga., on Thursday night. The Mon. A. M. Stephens addressed the meeting in opposition to succession. We copy an abridged report of his speech from the Augusta Dispatch: "He maintained that it would not be dishonorable to hold office under Lincoln, because he would for at least two years be a mere locum tenens in the hands of the Senate, by whom every appointment must be confirmed, and who would, therefore, have power t
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ronger every day, and he was willing to submit it even to the 'irrepressible conflict' of Seward. "The feelings and passions of the audience were evidently stronger against Mr. Stephens than for him at first, but he was listened to attentively and greeted with much applause. "At its close loud calls were made for Jackson — when Mr. Toombs ascended the stand, and waving his hat, said--Three cheers for my honored friend — than whom there is not a brighter intellect or truer heart in Georgia, and then let us adjourn." This gallant act showed that though he differs with Mr. Stephens on public policy, he still cherishes him for the admiration which the noble qualities of his mind and heart command. Mr. Jackson was compelled, by the calls for him, to speak, and replied to the allusions of Mr. Stephens, to the divisions at Charleston, and to other points which we cannot notice. Some of the Committee who invited Mr. Stephens to speak, objected to Mr. Jackson's having
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
et the approval of those who are not for immediate action. His policy, if carried out, will either restore the Government to a constitutional basis or force us to a dissolution. The Baptist State Convention of Alabama, in session at Montgomery, on the 14th inst., adopted a preamble and resolutions, presented by Rev. Basil Manly, which set forth the following: From the administration of the Federal Government, as things are — especially with reference to our peculiar property reents and uniforms for his company. A graduate of West Point, he served fourteen years in the United States Army, and in Virginia commanded in the volunteer service for eighteen years, where he had a regiment of fifteen companies. The Montgomery (Ala.) Mail says: The whole indebtedness, to the North for goods is virtually and by common consent postponed until we all get straight at the South. In some places, lawyers send back Northern notes sent them for collection; everywhere busi
Mecklenberg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
and Virginia, he said: We see North Carolina proverbially slow in joining in this cause; but I fully believe she will be with you before long. If North Carolina is slow, she is sure, and when she makes a move she can be depended upon. A portion of that State, I believe, was the first to proclaim the separation of the then existing union with the mother country. If the citizens of North Carolina claimed, as they did, to be sons of the patriots who declared independence in 1775, at Mecklenberg, and did not follow South Carolina, they would give the lie to their fathers, and show themselves spurious progeny of noble sires. [Applause] I do not believe that North Carolina will take that position. As to Virginia, would to God I could give you a better account; but there are many reasons that do not influence you why the border States should hesitate before taking this step. He had pressed these matters upon his countrymen, but thousands were of the opinion that Virginia woul
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
t heart than I have, or would make greater sacrifices to secure its success. [Loud and long continued applause] The Columbia South Carolinian, speaking of the military preparations in that State, says: At Walhalla, a military company is organizing. At Pendleton, a company has been formed, styled "the Fort Hill Guards," eighty-seven strong, and Col. Walter Gwyan elected Captain. He leaves town this morning, with arms, accoutrements and uniforms for his company. A graduate of West Point, he served fourteen years in the United States Army, and in Virginia commanded in the volunteer service for eighteen years, where he had a regiment of fifteen companies. The Montgomery (Ala.) Mail says: The whole indebtedness, to the North for goods is virtually and by common consent postponed until we all get straight at the South. In some places, lawyers send back Northern notes sent them for collection; everywhere business men refuse to pay such, on the ground that our inte
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
th, Colcock and Connor — with these she claims a march."--The tricolor flag was hung out from the theatre, with the words inserted-- Dieu et nos droits. Secession badges have become universal.--Even children are all adorned by mothers with the blue ribbon. All classes are arming for the contingency of coercion. Revolvers and patent fire arms are selling like hot cakes. Not a ship in the harbor has the federal flag flying, but far down the Bay it can still be discerned flying over Fort Moultrie. There was another great demonstration tonight. The stand near the pole was beautifully illuminated. Speeches were made by Captain Thomas, of the State Military Academy, who assured the audience that the Cadets were ready at a moment's notice; also by Chancellor Carroll, and Messrs. Mikell, Cooper, Tennent, Kirkwood and others. To-day the citizens are raising a great clamor for the banks to suspend now. It is supposed that it may be done about the middle of next week. The no
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
ecent canvass, I do not perceive that any patriotic objects can be advanced by any further public discussions on my part prior to resuming my seat in the Senate. That the passions and animosities engendered by recent contests may soon give place to reason and patriotism; that calm and wise counsels may prevail, and fraternal feeling be restored; that the Constitution may be preserved inviolate, and the Union maintained forever, is the ardent hope and fervent prayer of your friend and fellow citizen, "S. A. Douglas. "New Orleans, November 13, 1860." Cockades in the Pulpit. The Clayton (Ala.) Banner says that on Sunday last the Rev. Alexander McLennon, of the Methodist persuasion, preached in the Methodist Church of that town, with "the tricolor rosette conspicuous on his vest." Hon. John Forsyth advertises in the Mobile (Ala.) Register for eighty able-bodied men.--He wishes to form a military company for the protection of the honor and rights of Alabama.
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