hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 21 3 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Bell 16 0 Browse Search
Alabama (Alabama, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Douglas 12 2 Browse Search
A. M. Stephens 12 0 Browse Search
California (California, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 20, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 185 total hits in 59 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
k, objected to Mr. Jackson's having the stand, when he stepped upon the top of a desk and proceeded amid a scene of confusion which was quite exciting, and came very near being serious. The speech of Mr. Stephens in the main met the approval of those who are not for immediate action. His policy, if carried out, will either restore the Government to a constitutional basis or force us to a dissolution. The Baptist State Convention of Alabama, in session at Montgomery, on the 14th inst., adopted a preamble and resolutions, presented by Rev. Basil Manly, which set forth the following: From the administration of the Federal Government, as things are — especially with reference to our peculiar property recognized by the Constitution — we can no longer hope for justice, protection or safety. We have supposed ourselves entitled to equality of rights, as citizens of this republic. We are not willing to surrender them, even at the risk of life and all we hold most dear.
elf and those whose names are attached to the enclosed paper, I tender you our services, as stated in said paper. This is a copy taken by me from the original, which I retain for the purpose of enlarging the number. We expect to increase the number to fifty. Our people in this county, I think, are in favor of immediate secession, but need to be aroused. We have active friends, earnestly at work, whose labors are telling with striking effect. We have invited Gov. Wise to address us on the 22d. The subject will be publicly discussed next week in Greene, and the week after in Culpeper. I think it quite probable that a Convention of this State will he held. The immediate secession of one or more cotton States will greatly strengthen us in Virginia. We are looking with the greatest anxiety to South Carolina, and it would greatly cheer and strengthen us if we can be apprized that she will promptly secede. Yours truly. "To the Governor of South Carolina:--The undersigned
November 17th (search for this): article 1
Interesting from the South. The Liberty Pole at Charleston — The National Flag net Popular — Conservative Speech of Hon. A. H. Stephens at Milledgeville — The Cockade in the Pulpit, &c., &c. The following interesting news is collected from our Southern exchanges: A dispatch from Charleston to the New York Herald, dated November 17th, gives a fuller description of the raising of the "Liberty" pole there, on Saturday. It was put up near the Charleston Hotel, and the Palmetto flag was raised on it. The dispatch says: The pole was made of Carolina pine, one hundred feet high, and surmounted by the cap of liberty. Cables were stretched across the streets to prevent the passage of vehicles. There was a dense crowd, extending over two squares on Meeting street. The neighboring house-tops were crowded with people. Thousands of ladies of the highest respectability thronged the balconies and windows, waving their handkerchiefs.--Impromptu stands were erected, and<
rth Carolina and Virginia, he said: We see North Carolina proverbially slow in joining in this cause; but I fully believe she will be with you before long. If North Carolina is slow, she is sure, and when she makes a move she can be depended upon. A portion of that State, I believe, was the first to proclaim the separation of the then existing union with the mother country. If the citizens of North Carolina claimed, as they did, to be sons of the patriots who declared independence in 1775, at Mecklenberg, and did not follow South Carolina, they would give the lie to their fathers, and show themselves spurious progeny of noble sires. [Applause] I do not believe that North Carolina will take that position. As to Virginia, would to God I could give you a better account; but there are many reasons that do not influence you why the border States should hesitate before taking this step. He had pressed these matters upon his countrymen, but thousands were of the opinion that V
November 8th, 1860 AD (search for this): article 1
d that she will promptly secede. Yours truly. "To the Governor of South Carolina:--The undersigned citizens of Madison county. Virginia, believing that South Carolina will be the first to raise the standard for States-Rights and Southern liberty, against the encroachments of Northern fanaticism and Federal tyranny, do hereby tender their services to fight under her flag whenever she shall signify her wish to receive them, unless Virginia shall first require their aid. "Nov. 8th, 1860." The nominations for the State Convention in South Carolina have commenced. In Richland and Sumpter districts the candidates nominated are "all pledged to secession." In the latter district two of them are ministers of the Gospel. The excitement in Charleston continues. The Evening News of Saturday says: The first liberty pole that has ever been raised in the city, has been inaugurated to-day, amidst the smiles of lovely women, the hearty applause of men, the firing o
November 9th, 1860 AD (search for this): article 1
metto flag and sung the Marseilles hymn, slightly altered to suit the times. The effect was tremendous. The Executive of South Carolina is daily in receipt of letters from various Southern States proffering the services of volunteers to the State, in the event of the secession of South Carolina. The Columbia Guardian says: The following from Virginia, is accompanied by the subjoined tender, in form, signed by a number of citizens of Madison county: Madison, C. H, Va., Nov. 9th, 1860. To his Excellency the Governor of South Carolina--Dear Sir: On behalf of myself and those whose names are attached to the enclosed paper, I tender you our services, as stated in said paper. This is a copy taken by me from the original, which I retain for the purpose of enlarging the number. We expect to increase the number to fifty. Our people in this county, I think, are in favor of immediate secession, but need to be aroused. We have active friends, earnestly at work, whose
November 13th, 1860 AD (search for this): article 1
recent canvass, I do not perceive that any patriotic objects can be advanced by any further public discussions on my part prior to resuming my seat in the Senate. That the passions and animosities engendered by recent contests may soon give place to reason and patriotism; that calm and wise counsels may prevail, and fraternal feeling be restored; that the Constitution may be preserved inviolate, and the Union maintained forever, is the ardent hope and fervent prayer of your friend and fellow citizen, "S. A. Douglas. "New Orleans, November 13, 1860." Cockades in the Pulpit. The Clayton (Ala.) Banner says that on Sunday last the Rev. Alexander McLennon, of the Methodist persuasion, preached in the Methodist Church of that town, with "the tricolor rosette conspicuous on his vest." Hon. John Forsyth advertises in the Mobile (Ala.) Register for eighty able-bodied men.--He wishes to form a military company for the protection of the honor and rights of Alabama.
rs, where he had a regiment of fifteen companies. The Montgomery (Ala.) Mail says: The whole indebtedness, to the North for goods is virtually and by common consent postponed until we all get straight at the South. In some places, lawyers send back Northern notes sent them for collection; everywhere business men refuse to pay such, on the ground that our interests at present require that we should have no draft on our resources. Besides this, specie is pouring into our Southern Banks, as we learn on the best authority. Thus, after a very little while, our monetary affairs will become as satisfactory as ever; the coin will come from Europe, and cotton will command fair prices. The Charleston Courier says: The difficulty lately experienced here in negotiating even the shortest exchange on New York and Boston, may have occasioned some temporary inconvenience, but its results, otherwise, have been most gratifying. Every steamer from the North brings in heav
T. G. Barker (search for this): article 1
nto us the noble works which Thou didst in their days. Continue Thy goodness to us their children, and make us that happy people whose good is the Lord, through Jesus Christ, our Redeemer.--Amen. After the prayer, speeches were made by Messrs. Barker, Robertson, Canneau, Hammond and Northrop. The Washington Artillery paraded, and fired one hundred guns as the flag went up. Bells were rung and the band played the Marseilles Hymn. This fired up the French element of our population. Ao the truck of the lofty mast, and flung out to the winds at Heaven, bearing as it did our illustrious motto.--" animus opibusque parati." After a prayer by the Rev. C. P. Gadsden, speeches breathing the mast devoted patriotism were made by Col. T. G. Barker, Dr. F. M. Robertson, and Col. F. Canneau, who was speaking when we left. The enthusiasm of the day and occasion we have never seen equalled. The flags are springing up like gay-colored flames all over Charleston. One has a full port
F. Canneau (search for this): article 1
hich Thou didst in their days. Continue Thy goodness to us their children, and make us that happy people whose good is the Lord, through Jesus Christ, our Redeemer.--Amen. After the prayer, speeches were made by Messrs. Barker, Robertson, Canneau, Hammond and Northrop. The Washington Artillery paraded, and fired one hundred guns as the flag went up. Bells were rung and the band played the Marseilles Hymn. This fired up the French element of our population. After the Marseilles, tht to the winds at Heaven, bearing as it did our illustrious motto.--" animus opibusque parati." After a prayer by the Rev. C. P. Gadsden, speeches breathing the mast devoted patriotism were made by Col. T. G. Barker, Dr. F. M. Robertson, and Col. F. Canneau, who was speaking when we left. The enthusiasm of the day and occasion we have never seen equalled. The flags are springing up like gay-colored flames all over Charleston. One has a full portrait of Hon. A. G. McGrath, late Judge of t
1 2 3 4 5 6