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he Convention differ. The ultra Republicans are endeavoring to defeat compromise of any kind. The two sections — their strength in 1860. From the official census returns of 1860 are made the following tables of population in the North and the South, and in the Territories, showing the increase since 1850 in each section, and the alterations in the apportionment of members of Congress: Population of the Northern Confederacy. StatesPop'n. 1850Pop'n. 1860New Apportionment for Congr'ss.Old Apportionment. Maine583,169619,95856 N. Hampsh'e317,976326,07233 Vermont311,120315,82733 Mass994,5141,231,4941011 R. Island147,545174,62112 Connecticut370,792460,67044 New York3,097,3943,851,5633033 Pennsylv'a2,311,7862,916,0182325 New Jersey489,333676,03455 Ohio1,980,4272,377,9171921 Indiana988,4161,350,8021111 Illinois851,4701,691,233139 Michigan397,654754,29164 Wisconsin305,391768,48564 Iowa192,214682,00052 Minnestoa6,077172,79312 Oregon18,29452,55611 California92
ffectionate memory of a glorious, Union loving, law-abiding people. The Aid to Gov. Andrews, of Massachusetts, is in Washington, and called to-day on Lieut. Gen. Scott, it is understood, to tender to him, in the name of Gov. Andrews, the services of Massachusetts militia. Gen. Scott listened to the proffer, and then replied, that the Government needed no volunteers, and if needed, Massachusetts would not be called upon. The Peace Convention held a four hour's session yesterday. Mr. Seddon, of Virginia, urged an immediate consideration of the Crittenden Compromise. A prolonged debate ensued, and finally, at the request of Mr. Guthrie, of Tennessee, the subject was laid over until to-day. Views as to the probable result of the deliberations of the Convention differ. The ultra Republicans are endeavoring to defeat compromise of any kind. The two sections — their strength in 1860. From the official census returns of 1860 are made the following tables of population i
can do so with safety. In the event of the Captains of the Sabine and St. Louis not being able to enter that port, they are instructed to proceed to Hampton Roads, or act at their own discretion. The Commodore further says, "I beg leave to state to the Department that I apprehend difficulties in regard to dispatches of the Department reaching me by way of New Orleans, and any dispatches reaching the Department, and therefore recommend that duplicates be sent by way of Havana, in care of Consul Helin. I may also find it necessary to move the squadron to Havana, and will there await orders, if I do not succeed in procuring money here.--I will, however, leave a small vessel at this port for the present." Virginia's verdict is generally considered to have broken the back of secession. Its effect on the conservative majority of Northern men in Congress is to increase their disposition to arrange some compromise that shall strengthen the Border States in resisting the tide of seces
Pendergast (search for this): article 1
n be seen, in undress uniform, strolling through all parts of the city, and seem to enjoy the change from fort and barrack duty to the bustling streets of the Metropolis. The statement in some of the New York papers that they were to be immediately dispersed on account of the gratifying result of the Virginia election is erroneous. On the contrary, other companies have been ordered here within the past few days. The Navy Department are in receipt of voluminous dispatches from Flag Officer Pendergast, of the Home Squadron. In obedience to instructions sent by Col. Pickett, bearer of dispatches, the Commodore had directed the Sabine and St. Louis to proceed at once to Pensacola. These vessels will not enter that port unless they can do so with safety. In the event of the Captains of the Sabine and St. Louis not being able to enter that port, they are instructed to proceed to Hampton Roads, or act at their own discretion. The Commodore further says, "I beg leave to state to th
m to enjoy the change from fort and barrack duty to the bustling streets of the Metropolis. The statement in some of the New York papers that they were to be immediately dispersed on account of the gratifying result of the Virginia election is erroneous. On the contrary, other companies have been ordered here within the past few days. The Navy Department are in receipt of voluminous dispatches from Flag Officer Pendergast, of the Home Squadron. In obedience to instructions sent by Col. Pickett, bearer of dispatches, the Commodore had directed the Sabine and St. Louis to proceed at once to Pensacola. These vessels will not enter that port unless they can do so with safety. In the event of the Captains of the Sabine and St. Louis not being able to enter that port, they are instructed to proceed to Hampton Roads, or act at their own discretion. The Commodore further says, "I beg leave to state to the Department that I apprehend difficulties in regard to dispatches of the Depart
Davis President (search for this): article 1
hich may oppose immediate action and the organization of a Southern Confederacy. They will fail in their efforts, however, although they may foster discontent. The Mississippi State Convention elected a full representation to the Congress to be established by the Provisional Government. They consist of the late members of the U.S. Congress, both in the Senate and House. It then sent deputies, to carry out here its other arrangements; which are, to elect, by this Convention, Senator Davis President of the Southern Confederacy, and to take the Constitution of the United States just as it is. The policy of Mississippi, I understand, extends no further. A permanent Constitution, for a permanent Government, is to be thrown over.--That is to be thought of at some future day, (as Mr. Seward says, "one, two, or three years hence,") when the frontier States are in union with us. I propose now to state to you the Georgia project. It is this: That the Convention here shall elect
William C. Rives (search for this): article 1
t necessary to move the squadron to Havana, and will there await orders, if I do not succeed in procuring money here.--I will, however, leave a small vessel at this port for the present." Virginia's verdict is generally considered to have broken the back of secession. Its effect on the conservative majority of Northern men in Congress is to increase their disposition to arrange some compromise that shall strengthen the Border States in resisting the tide of secession in the South. Wm. C. Rives, in conversation to-day, cautioned gentlemen not to mistake the postponement for the abandonment of secession in Virginia. He said, "We will secede if our difficulties are not composed upon an equitable basis, and Virginia will wait to see whether that basis be accepted or rejected, " "What basis?" was asked. "The Crittenden propositions," was the reply. The speech of Mr. Bouligny, of Louisiana, in refusing to accede to the request of his Legislature, to withdraw from the House, no
y consist of the late members of the U.S. Congress, both in the Senate and House. It then sent deputies, to carry out here its other arrangements; which are, to elect, by this Convention, Senator Davis President of the Southern Confederacy, and to take the Constitution of the United States just as it is. The policy of Mississippi, I understand, extends no further. A permanent Constitution, for a permanent Government, is to be thrown over.--That is to be thought of at some future day, (as Mr. Seward says, "one, two, or three years hence,") when the frontier States are in union with us. I propose now to state to you the Georgia project. It is this: That the Convention here shall elect a President of the Southern Confederacy. But a President without a Legislature which can create a Cabinet, foreign ministers, an army and navy, and raise the money to support them, is an useless absurdity. The Georgians, therefore, propose that the Convention here assembled shall assume all legisl
ginia will wait to see whether that basis be accepted or rejected, " "What basis?" was asked. "The Crittenden propositions," was the reply. The speech of Mr. Bouligny, of Louisiana, in refusing to accede to the request of his Legislature, to withdraw from the House, not only produced a tremendous sensation at the time, among the members and spectators, but has won for him the praises of conservative Union- loving men everywhere. After the House adjourned, Mr. Crittenden met Mr. Bouligny, and, grasping him with both hands, invoked God's blessing upon him, assuring him, that however much he might be cursed now by those who are disloyal to their country, he (Bouligny) would outlive them all in the affectionate memory of a glorious, Union loving, law-abiding people. The Aid to Gov. Andrews, of Massachusetts, is in Washington, and called to-day on Lieut. Gen. Scott, it is understood, to tender to him, in the name of Gov. Andrews, the services of Massachusetts militia.
Crittenden (search for this): article 1
ent for the abandonment of secession in Virginia. He said, "We will secede if our difficulties are not composed upon an equitable basis, and Virginia will wait to see whether that basis be accepted or rejected, " "What basis?" was asked. "The Crittenden propositions," was the reply. The speech of Mr. Bouligny, of Louisiana, in refusing to accede to the request of his Legislature, to withdraw from the House, not only produced a tremendous sensation at the time, among the members and spectators, but has won for him the praises of conservative Union- loving men everywhere. After the House adjourned, Mr. Crittenden met Mr. Bouligny, and, grasping him with both hands, invoked God's blessing upon him, assuring him, that however much he might be cursed now by those who are disloyal to their country, he (Bouligny) would outlive them all in the affectionate memory of a glorious, Union loving, law-abiding people. The Aid to Gov. Andrews, of Massachusetts, is in Washington, and
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