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sent, with the Colonel's permission, for all private property, which the Colonel promptly gave up. Lieut. Slimmer is a fine looking man, of about 35 years old, wearing spectacles. He says he regrets the hostile attitude of the two sections, and hopes for a peaceable settlement, but intends doing his duty under any emergency.--Lieut. Gilman has been here and dined with the Colonel. Lieut. Berryman, of the U. S. steamship Wyandotte, came here the other day and took Captains Winter, Andrews, Dixon, Maj. Marks, Dr. Semple, and others aboard his ship, and sailed them all around Pickens, gave them elegant wine, &c. They speak very highly of them as high-toned gentlemen. Another correspondent, writing from Fort Moultrie, says: The signal for dress parade was given, when the 1st Regiment of S. C. Volunteers assembled on the front beach, almost under the very guns of Fort Sumter, and was received by Mrs. Governor Pickens, accompanied by her step-daughter. This was a pleasant ep
el's permission, for all private property, which the Colonel promptly gave up. Lieut. Slimmer is a fine looking man, of about 35 years old, wearing spectacles. He says he regrets the hostile attitude of the two sections, and hopes for a peaceable settlement, but intends doing his duty under any emergency.--Lieut. Gilman has been here and dined with the Colonel. Lieut. Berryman, of the U. S. steamship Wyandotte, came here the other day and took Captains Winter, Andrews, Dixon, Maj. Marks, Dr. Semple, and others aboard his ship, and sailed them all around Pickens, gave them elegant wine, &c. They speak very highly of them as high-toned gentlemen. Another correspondent, writing from Fort Moultrie, says: The signal for dress parade was given, when the 1st Regiment of S. C. Volunteers assembled on the front beach, almost under the very guns of Fort Sumter, and was received by Mrs. Governor Pickens, accompanied by her step-daughter. This was a pleasant episode in military para
five United States Dragoons, were from Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania; and arrived in the morning train of the Northern Central Railway. They were accompanied by their horses, and departed for Washington in a special train.-- Balt. Amer. Resignations in the home Squadron. A correspondent of the New Orleans Delta, at Vera Cruz, writing on the 20th ult., states that Paymaster Clarke and Surgeon Grafton, both of Arkansas, and now in the Home Squadron, have sent in their resignations, and asked to be relieved at once. Lieuts. Rutledge, Porcher, Ingraham, and Evans, of South Carolina, and Midshipman Read, of Mississippi, have done the same. Flag-Officer Pendergrass has forwarded their resignations, but refuses to allow them to return home. These officers have represented to him that the Union is dissolved, and that they cannot and will not serve under a flag that is hostile to the South. Com. Pendergrass, although a Kentuckian by birth, adheres to the Central Government.
ays: Yesterday we had a visit from Lieut. Slimmer, who came for the purpose of apologizing to our Colonel for taking the mattress he slept on. Slimmer having sent, with the Colonel's permission, for all private property, which the Colonel promptly gave up. Lieut. Slimmer is a fine looking man, of about 35 years old, wearing spectacles. He says he regrets the hostile attitude of the two sections, and hopes for a peaceable settlement, but intends doing his duty under any emergency.--Lieut. Gilman has been here and dined with the Colonel. Lieut. Berryman, of the U. S. steamship Wyandotte, came here the other day and took Captains Winter, Andrews, Dixon, Maj. Marks, Dr. Semple, and others aboard his ship, and sailed them all around Pickens, gave them elegant wine, &c. They speak very highly of them as high-toned gentlemen. Another correspondent, writing from Fort Moultrie, says: The signal for dress parade was given, when the 1st Regiment of S. C. Volunteers assembled
the Amenities of "War"--the force in Fort Sumter--resignations in the home Squadron--Feeling towards the South in Kentucky--a parting, &c., &c. Amenities of "War." A letter from Pensacola says: Yesterday we had a visit from Lieut. Slimmer, who came for the purpose of apologizing to our Colonel for taking the mattress he slept on. Slimmer having sent, with the Colonel's permission, for all private property, which the Colonel promptly gave up. Lieut. Slimmer is a fine looking maLieut. Slimmer is a fine looking man, of about 35 years old, wearing spectacles. He says he regrets the hostile attitude of the two sections, and hopes for a peaceable settlement, but intends doing his duty under any emergency.--Lieut. Gilman has been here and dined with the Colonel. Lieut. Berryman, of the U. S. steamship Wyandotte, came here the other day and took Captains Winter, Andrews, Dixon, Maj. Marks, Dr. Semple, and others aboard his ship, and sailed them all around Pickens, gave them elegant wine, &c. They speak very
Pendergrass (search for this): article 1
h of Arkansas, and now in the Home Squadron, have sent in their resignations, and asked to be relieved at once. Lieuts. Rutledge, Porcher, Ingraham, and Evans, of South Carolina, and Midshipman Read, of Mississippi, have done the same. Flag-Officer Pendergrass has forwarded their resignations, but refuses to allow them to return home. These officers have represented to him that the Union is dissolved, and that they cannot and will not serve under a flag that is hostile to the South. Com. Pennd asked to be relieved at once. Lieuts. Rutledge, Porcher, Ingraham, and Evans, of South Carolina, and Midshipman Read, of Mississippi, have done the same. Flag-Officer Pendergrass has forwarded their resignations, but refuses to allow them to return home. These officers have represented to him that the Union is dissolved, and that they cannot and will not serve under a flag that is hostile to the South. Com. Pendergrass, although a Kentuckian by birth, adheres to the Central Government.
s and Suber, the two ladies marched, to music, down the lines to the entire left, and back to the post of Col. Gregg, when Mrs. Pickens very gracefully saluted the Colonel. The force in Fort Sumter. There had been no reinforcement of Major Anderson up to the time of the Marion leaving on Friday last. Seventy-nine persons, including the officers and band, and exclusive of a working corps of some twenty men, under Captain Foster, constitute the whole garrison — a force generally felt to nition, and any quantity of grenades of a destructive character have been prepared for use at close quarters. There have been no desertions; no disaffection exists, and the entire command entertain the highest respect and even admiration for Major Anderson, with whom they are ready to stand or fall in their country's defence.-- New York Times. Feeling Toward the South in Kentucky. The Louisville Courier, a Democratic paper, in noticing the introduction in the Legislature by Mr. Harriso
pt on. Slimmer having sent, with the Colonel's permission, for all private property, which the Colonel promptly gave up. Lieut. Slimmer is a fine looking man, of about 35 years old, wearing spectacles. He says he regrets the hostile attitude of the two sections, and hopes for a peaceable settlement, but intends doing his duty under any emergency.--Lieut. Gilman has been here and dined with the Colonel. Lieut. Berryman, of the U. S. steamship Wyandotte, came here the other day and took Captains Winter, Andrews, Dixon, Maj. Marks, Dr. Semple, and others aboard his ship, and sailed them all around Pickens, gave them elegant wine, &c. They speak very highly of them as high-toned gentlemen. Another correspondent, writing from Fort Moultrie, says: The signal for dress parade was given, when the 1st Regiment of S. C. Volunteers assembled on the front beach, almost under the very guns of Fort Sumter, and was received by Mrs. Governor Pickens, accompanied by her step-daughter. T
Wednesday in April next, to take into consideration the responses of our sister States to the proposition for a National Convention, and the then condition of the nation, and to adopt such measures as may be proper, and the interests of Kentucky may require." A parting. The wives and children of the soldiers at Fort Sumter, who arrived in New York Wednesday on the Marion, have been sent to Fort Hamilton. A letter from one of the passengers on the Marion says: "On Sunday, the 3d inst., as the Marion was proceeding down Charleston harbor, having on board amongst the passengers the wives--twenty in number — and children belonging to the soldiers stationed in Fort Sumter, a somewhat exciting scene occurred. On nearing the fort the whole garrison was seen, mounted on the top of the ramparts, and when the ship was passing fired a gun, and gave three heart-thrilling cheers as a parting farewell to the dear loved ones on board, whom they may possibly never meet again this side
train for Washington. They were fully equipped and went immediately through for the Metropolis. The second detachment consisted of fifty-five United States Dragoons, were from Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania; and arrived in the morning train of the Northern Central Railway. They were accompanied by their horses, and departed for Washington in a special train.-- Balt. Amer. Resignations in the home Squadron. A correspondent of the New Orleans Delta, at Vera Cruz, writing on the 20th ult., states that Paymaster Clarke and Surgeon Grafton, both of Arkansas, and now in the Home Squadron, have sent in their resignations, and asked to be relieved at once. Lieuts. Rutledge, Porcher, Ingraham, and Evans, of South Carolina, and Midshipman Read, of Mississippi, have done the same. Flag-Officer Pendergrass has forwarded their resignations, but refuses to allow them to return home. These officers have represented to him that the Union is dissolved, and that they cannot and will no
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