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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 4
ising columns of the Charleston Mercury of Friday. The name attached to it is that of the President of the South Carolina College, and who, about the time that the Brooklyn was first rumored to be preparing for a visit to Charleston, published a pamphlet imploring the authorities and citizens of that city not to oppose her entrance to the harbor, and avoid thus the responsibility of initiating civil war: Fort Sumter.--The time is approaching when Fort Sumter will probably be attacked. Let the assailants remember that the garrison, are in the main, poor hirelings, bound to obey the orders of their superiors, and, doubtless, not disposed to fight if they could avoid it; that they are not responsible for the acts of the President, or of the United States, and that not one of them should be put to death, but as a necessary measure to secure the fort to South Carolina. Let not one be killed after the fort is surrendered; let as little blood be shed as possible. A. B. Longstreet.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 4
tising columns of the Charleston Mercury of Friday. The name attached to it is that of the President of the South Carolina College, and who, about the time that the Brooklyn was first rumored to be preparing for a visit to Charleston, published a pamphlet imploring the authorities and citizens of that city not to oppose her entrance to the harbor, and avoid thus the responsibility of initiating civil war: Fort Sumter.--The time is approaching when Fort Sumter will probably be attacked. Let the assailants remember that the garrison, are in the main, poor hirelings, bound to obey the orders of their superiors, and, doubtless, not disposed to fight if they could avoid it; that they are not responsible for the acts of the President, or of the United States, and that not one of them should be put to death, but as a necessary measure to secure the fort to South Carolina. Let not one be killed after the fort is surrendered; let as little blood be shed as possible. A. B. Longstreet.
A. B. Longstreet (search for this): article 4
tising columns of the Charleston Mercury of Friday. The name attached to it is that of the President of the South Carolina College, and who, about the time that the Brooklyn was first rumored to be preparing for a visit to Charleston, published a pamphlet imploring the authorities and citizens of that city not to oppose her entrance to the harbor, and avoid thus the responsibility of initiating civil war: Fort Sumter.--The time is approaching when Fort Sumter will probably be attacked. Let the assailants remember that the garrison, are in the main, poor hirelings, bound to obey the orders of their superiors, and, doubtless, not disposed to fight if they could avoid it; that they are not responsible for the acts of the President, or of the United States, and that not one of them should be put to death, but as a necessary measure to secure the fort to South Carolina. Let not one be killed after the fort is surrendered; let as little blood be shed as possible. A. B. Longstreet.