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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 2
The Maryland State Convention. --The State Convention called by the people of Maryland, met in Baltimore on Monday. The usual preliminary business was transacted. Judge Chambers, who was chosen President, said on taking the chair, that-- The object in calling the Convention had been utterly misconceived, and there hadMaryland, met in Baltimore on Monday. The usual preliminary business was transacted. Judge Chambers, who was chosen President, said on taking the chair, that-- The object in calling the Convention had been utterly misconceived, and there had been intemperate expressions which should not have been indulged in; for while we are honest in purpose, we should be willing to grant honesty of purpose to all. When the meetings the held one body will be termed abolitionists, and the other body will be called secessionists. Some had ascribed secession purposes to this Conventiin the chair with that view, he did not take it as a compliment. He deemed secession the greatest curse that could come upon the country. He was for the Union as the greatest blessing — for the Union so long as it could be honorably maintained — so long as it was consistent with the honor and integrity of the State of Maryland
The Maryland State Convention. --The State Convention called by the people of Maryland, met in Baltimore on Monday. The usual preliminary business was transacted. Judge Chambers, who was chosen President, said on taking the chair, that-- The object in calling the Convention had been utterly misconceived, and there had been intemperate expressions which should not have been indulged in; for while we are honest in purpose, we should be willing to grant honesty of purpose to all. When the meetings the held one body will be termed abolitionists, and the other body will be called secessionists. Some had ascribed secession purposes to this Convention, but no greater mistake could have been made or entertained; and if any member had assisted in placing him in the chair with that view, he did not take it as a compliment. He deemed secession the greatest curse that could come upon the country. He was for the Union as the greatest blessing — for the Union so long as it could be h