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Wyoming (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): article 1
e on Elections, submitted a report showing the vote on the question of referring the action of the Convention back to the people. The committee were unable to make a final report, as sixteen counties were unheard from ; but they could at present give an approximate of what would be the final result. They report that in all, except the following counties, to wit: Barbour, Boone, Braxton, Buchanan, Cabell, Elizabeth City, Greene, Logan, McDowell, Prince William, Putnam, Upshur, Wayne, Wise, Wyoming and York, from which returns have not been received, the whole number of votes cast was 140,511; of which 96, 684 were cast for referring to the people, and 43,827 against referring to the people; showing a majority, as far as heard from, of 52,857 for referring. On motion of Mr. Patrick, the report was laid on the table and ordered to be printed. Mr. Johnson, of Richmond, offered the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed to
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ught the point of order was not correct, but if any member chose to object to the resolution he could do so. the President said the resolution would go to the Committee unless objected to. Mr. Early.--I object, then. Mr. Scott, of Fauquier, alluded to the arduous duties of the Committee, and said if they were instructed to make these inquiries they would have to neglect other matters of importance. He suggested a modification of the resolution so as to place the duty upon a selectriumphal march of the President elect towards the Federal capital. Virginia should speak promptly and unequivocally as to where she would stand in the coming conflict. after further remarks from Messrs. Conrad, of Frederick, and Scott, of Fauquier, to the effect that a vote on the resolution now would be liable to misconstruction, Mr. Goode withdrew his motion at the suggestion of Mr. Harvie, and the resolution was referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Fisher offered th
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
sed with instructions to inquire," &c. Mr. Early could see no necessity for instituting such an inquiry. What difference could it make to this Convention whether the President, in the exercise of his undoubted authority, sent troops to Fortress Monroe and Harper's Ferry, to protect the public property, or not? his people were not alarmed, nor did he believe were the constituents of the gentleman from Pennsylvania alarmed. If the guns mounted on the parapet at Fortress Monroe were not foFortress Monroe were not for the purpose of coercing the people of Virginia, but for the protection of the public property, no one would be injured unless he foolishly thrust himself into the mouth of one of them. He fully appreciated the motive of the gentleman from Pennsylvania in offering the resolution, but could see no necessity for it at this time. Mr. Tredway said he offered it as a mere matter of inquiry on a subject now deeply exercising the public mind. A Peace Conference, inaugurated by Virginia, was no
Elizabeth City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
his recollection. the vote for Reference. Mr. Haymond, from the Committee on Elections, submitted a report showing the vote on the question of referring the action of the Convention back to the people. The committee were unable to make a final report, as sixteen counties were unheard from ; but they could at present give an approximate of what would be the final result. They report that in all, except the following counties, to wit: Barbour, Boone, Braxton, Buchanan, Cabell, Elizabeth City, Greene, Logan, McDowell, Prince William, Putnam, Upshur, Wayne, Wise, Wyoming and York, from which returns have not been received, the whole number of votes cast was 140,511; of which 96, 684 were cast for referring to the people, and 43,827 against referring to the people; showing a majority, as far as heard from, of 52,857 for referring. On motion of Mr. Patrick, the report was laid on the table and ordered to be printed. Mr. Johnson, of Richmond, offered the following resol
Saint James (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
Virginia State Convention.Seventh day. Wednesday, Feb. 20, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 12 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Peterson, of St. James' (Episcopal) Church. Publishing the Debates. Mr. Clemens said he rose to a privileged question, for the purpose of putting the stamp of reprobation and denial upon a report which had gained credence through the newspapers, but would previously offer a resolution to test whether the debates of this body should be made the object of private enterprise, or kept in the hands of those employed by the Convention to report them with a view to their publication hereafter. The resolution is as follows: Resolved, That the President of this Convention have authority to employ, at a fixed rate of compensation, a sufficient number of reporters to take down, as they occur, the debates of this body, with a view to the publication of the same hereafter, in a portable form, if it shall be deemed, by this body, e
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 1
d the complication and magnitude of the interests involved, Virginia distinctly declares that, failing if she should in this her earnest effort to accomplish the objects above indicated, her natural ties, her clear rights and sacred honor alike dictate a firm and prompt adhesion on her part to the common cause of the Southern States and the blending of their interests and destiny with her own. 5. That we invite and request the States of Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Maryland, Delaware and North Carolina, to appoint Commissioners to meet Commissioners appointed by this Convention, at Wytheville, in the county of Wythe, in this State, on the last Thursday in March next, to devise the best means of promoting our mutual interest. 6. That we elect eleven Commissioners to carry out the provisions of the fifth resolution, and that they report their determination to this Convention on the — day of April. 7. That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to the Governments
Carolina City (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
nsideration of honor and interest; demands that Virginia shall unite her destiny with the slaveholding States of the South. Resolved, That when any one or more of the States has determined, or shall hereafter determine, under existing circumstances, to withdraw from the Union, we are unalterably opposed to any attempt on the part of the Federal Government to coerce the same into re-union or submission, and that we will assist the same by all the means in our power. Mr. Morris, of Carolina, offered the following: 1. resolved. that the Union of the South is the safety of the South. 2. resolved. that in our opinion each of the remaining slaveholding States of this Union should speedily resume the powers delegated by them to the Federal Government, and co-operate afterwards. referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Tredway submitted the following: resolved, that the Committee on Federal Relations be instructed to inquire and report as spe
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
ion of kindly feeling in all parts of the country, and of reconstructing the constitutional compact and Union upon an honorable, equal and permanent basis, and the hope of securing the return of the Cotton States which have withdrawn from the United States, Virginia will not for the present exercise here inherent right of declaring herself an independent sovereignty of America. 4. But, that, desiring and intending to act with the candor and independence becoming her position and her relatio out the provisions of the fifth resolution, and that they report their determination to this Convention on the — day of April. 7. That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to the Governments of all the States, to the President of the United States, and to the Governors of the Confederated States of North America and to the President thereof. Mr. Chambliss spoke in favor of the resolutions in so far as they proposed resistance to coercion, but was opposed to so long a delay of act
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 1
his county had been referred to, he felt it to be his duty to state that such documents were received there under the frank of Sherrard Clemens--two of them to free negroes, one of whom could read. They had also been sent to negroes in Essex and Orange under the same frank. He then produced two envelopes which had been preserved. Mr. Clemens examined the franks, and pronounced them both forgeries. Mr. Montague was glad to hear it. He proceeded to make a point that when corruption hadumbent on him to say, that though the gentleman from Ohio had fairly and fully exonerated himself, the statement that such matter under such frank was received, was true. Mr. Morton said he had letters from two highly respectable citizens of Orange, mentioning the names of negroes who had received incendiary matter under the frank of the gentleman from Ohio. He was gratified to hear his explanation, and since he proposed to investigate the matter, he would place the letters temporarily in
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
circulation of the half sheet of the National Intelligencer, containing his own, and Millson's and Nelson's speeches. He left none of his franks in Washington. He then gave a list of the counties to which he had sent documents, and excluded Middlesex and others, which were included in the charge against him. His denial was clothed in most emphatic language. Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, said that as his county had been referred to, he felt it to be his duty to state that such documents wMiddlesex, said that as his county had been referred to, he felt it to be his duty to state that such documents were received there under the frank of Sherrard Clemens--two of them to free negroes, one of whom could read. They had also been sent to negroes in Essex and Orange under the same frank. He then produced two envelopes which had been preserved. Mr. Clemens examined the franks, and pronounced them both forgeries. Mr. Montague was glad to hear it. He proceeded to make a point that when corruption had become so great at Washington that forgery was resorted to for the purpose of circulati
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