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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 21, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 9
Mayor Mayo, of Richmond, at New York. The battalion drill of the New York National Guard was varied on Friday evening by the visit of the Hon. Joseph Mayo, Mayor of Richmond, Va., who arrived a few minutes before the regimental formation, in company with Ex-Colonel Duryea and family. He was warmly welcomed by his military friends, and when at 9 o'clock the men were allowed to break ranks, they captured their old friend, the Mayor, dragged him to the centre of the room and then surrounded him. Good-naturedly protesting, as a peaceable citizen, against being surrounded by armed men, he most feelingly expressed his gratification at meeting his old friends of the Seventh, and alluded to his pleasant visit to the city. He spoke of the present distracted state of the country, and hoped that the Union might not be ruined by the politicians. He trusted the day would be far distant when the Seventh would be arrayed in hostility against their Southern brethren. "If you come to Richmo
Mayor Mayo, of Richmond, at New York. The battalion drill of the New York National Guard was varied on Friday evening by the visit of the Hon. Joseph Mayo, Mayor of Richmond, Va., who arrived a few minutes before the regimental formation, in company with Ex-Colonel Duryea and family. He was warmly welcomed by his military friends, and when at 9 o'clock the men were allowed to break ranks, they captured their old friend, the Mayor, dragged him to the centre of the room and then surrounded him. Good-naturedly protesting, as a peaceable citizen, against being surrounded by armed men, he most feelingly expressed his gratification at meeting his old friends of the Seventh, and alluded to his pleasant visit to the city. He spoke of the present distracted state of the country, and hoped that the Union might not be ruined by the politicians. He trusted the day would be far distant when the Seventh would be arrayed in hostility against their Southern brethren. "If you come to Richmo
Joseph Mayo (search for this): article 9
Mayor Mayo, of Richmond, at New York. The battalion drill of the New York National Guard was varied on Friday evening by the visit of the Hon. Joseph Mayo, Mayor of Richmond, Va., who arrived a few minutes before the regimental formation, in company with Ex-Colonel Duryea and family. He was warmly welcomed by his military friends, and when at 9 o'clock the men were allowed to break ranks, they captured their old friend, the Mayor, dragged him to the centre of the room and then surroundedthe Hon. Joseph Mayo, Mayor of Richmond, Va., who arrived a few minutes before the regimental formation, in company with Ex-Colonel Duryea and family. He was warmly welcomed by his military friends, and when at 9 o'clock the men were allowed to break ranks, they captured their old friend, the Mayor, dragged him to the centre of the room and then surrounded him. Good-naturedly protesting, as a peaceable citizen, against being surrounded by armed men, he most feelingly expressed his gratification at meeting his old friends of the Seventh, and alluded to his pleasant visit to the city. He spoke of the present distracted state of the country, and hoped that the Union might not be ruined by the politicians. He trusted the day would be far distant when the Seventh would be arrayed in hostility against their Southern brethren. "If you come to Richmon
t 9 o'clock the men were allowed to break ranks, they captured their old friend, the Mayor, dragged him to the centre of the room and then surrounded him. Good-naturedly protesting, as a peaceable citizen, against being surrounded by armed men, he most feelingly expressed his gratification at meeting his old friends of the Seventh, and alluded to his pleasant visit to the city. He spoke of the present distracted state of the country, and hoped that the Union might not be ruined by the politicians. He trusted the day would be far distant when the Seventh would be arrayed in hostility against their Southern brethren. "If you come to Richmond," said he, "I will disarm you all by good cheer and hospitality. Give Virginia her rights, and she will be the last to desert the glorious flag of the Union." In conclusion, he remarked, grasping the hand of Col. Lefferts, that if he had the old Seventh in Richmond, they together could settle all the present differences without any difficulty.