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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 22, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
at Virginia recognizes no authority in any Government, State or Federal, to coerce her, or any of her citizens, to render allegiance to the Government of the United States, after she may, in the exercise of her sovereign power, have withdrawn from it; and that she will regard any attempt at coercion as equivalent to a declaration of war against her, to be resisted at "every hazard and to the last extremity." 4. That the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, having severally and formally withdrawn the allegiance of their respective people from the United States of America, a faithful, earnest desire to avert civil war, and the sound conservative sentiment of the country, alike indicate to the Government of the United States the necessity and policy of acknowledging their independence. In speaking upon his resolutions, Mr. Woods alluded in eloquent terms to the services and sacrifices of Virginia in forming and maintaining the
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
nder allegiance and obedience to her alone. 3. That Virginia recognizes no authority in any Government, State or Federal, to coerce her, or any of her citizens, to render allegiance to the Government of the United States, after she may, in the exercise of her sovereign power, have withdrawn from it; and that she will regard any attempt at coercion as equivalent to a declaration of war against her, to be resisted at "every hazard and to the last extremity." 4. That the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, having severally and formally withdrawn the allegiance of their respective people from the United States of America, a faithful, earnest desire to avert civil war, and the sound conservative sentiment of the country, alike indicate to the Government of the United States the necessity and policy of acknowledging their independence. In speaking upon his resolutions, Mr. Woods alluded in eloquent terms to the services and s
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
orted in the Richmond Enquirer. He merely wished to put himself right — not to find fault with the reporter. The National difficulties. Mr. Woods, of Barbour, submitted the following resolutions: Resolved, That the allegiance which the citizens of Virginia owe to the Federal Government of the United States of America, is subordinate to that due to Virginia, and may therefore be lawfully withdrawn by her whenever she may deem it her duty to do so. 2. That in case the State of Virginia should exercise this authority, her citizens would be in duty bound to render allegiance and obedience to her alone. 3. That Virginia recognizes no authority in any Government, State or Federal, to coerce her, or any of her citizens, to render allegiance to the Government of the United States, after she may, in the exercise of her sovereign power, have withdrawn from it; and that she will regard any attempt at coercion as equivalent to a declaration of war against her, to be resis
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
That the allegiance which the citizens of Virginia owe to the Federal Government of the United States of America, is subordinate to that due to Virginia, and may therefore be lawfully withdrawn by herederal, to coerce her, or any of her citizens, to render allegiance to the Government of the United States, after she may, in the exercise of her sovereign power, have withdrawn from it; and that sheing severally and formally withdrawn the allegiance of their respective people from the United States of America, a faithful, earnest desire to avert civil war, and the sound conservative sentiment of the country, alike indicate to the Government of the United States the necessity and policy of acknowledging their independence. In speaking upon his resolutions, Mr. Woods alluded in eloquent verted, he believed it was the sentiment of the sound and conservative people throughout the United States that it was the duty of the Government to recognize them as sovereign and independent.
Middlesex (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 1
ated the Enquirer as the organ of publication. He moved, by way of relieving the President from his difficulty, that the Secretary of the Commonwealth, who had large experience in such matters, be authorized to execute the contract. Mr. Staples moved as an amendment that the subject be referred to a committee of five. Mr. Wise maintained that any change in the resolution would be out of order. Mr. Clemens, rising to a question of order, said the motion of the gentleman from Middlesex, as well as the amendment of the gentleman from Patrick, were inconsistent with the resolution adopted by the Convention. In order to entertain such motions the resolution would have to be reconsidered. After further remarks and suggestions, the President remarked that he would proceed to execute the contract, as directed by the resolution. Mr. Johnson, of Richmond, said he had voted for the resolution yesterday, and against reconsideration; but he thought there was some conflic
Jefferson City (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, was opposed to adjourning over at all. It was rumored that the Peace Conference was about to conclude its labors, and he thought no time should be lost, in view of that fact. If the gentleman from Harrison (Mr. Carlile) wanted to hear Washington's Farewell Address, he would agree to go to his room and read it to him. Mr. Dorman explained why he should vote against adjourning over to Monday. A resolution was laid on the table yesterday in consideration of the absence of the gentleman from Jefferson, who would probably be in his seat on Saturday, when the resolution could be called up. The amendment was adopted, and the resolution, as amended, passed. Invitation. A letter was read from Messrs. Ettenger & Edmond, inviting the members of the Convention to witness a trial of a steam fire-engine, of their manufacture, at 4 o'clock P. M. On motion of Mr. Hallm, of Wetzel, the Convention adjourned, to meet again on Saturday at 12 o'clock.
Mecklenburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
He spoke for his own people, and he believed such was the sentiment of the whole Trans-Allegheny region. He alluded, in eloquent terms, to their record of the past, and said if it was a fault to love the Union, they had learned it from the great men who laid the foundation of the Government. Mr. W. quoted with much effect, in enlarging upon this point, from Washington's Farewell Address, and from the words of Clay after the passage of the Compromise measures of 1850. Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, made some remarks, in which he also dwelt upon the glories of the past; but said that his constituents, smarting under the wrongs of the Black Republican party, were prepared to resist. Mr. Woods' resolutions were then referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Washington's birthday. Mr. Carlile said that as the Committee on Federal Relations would not probably be prepared to report before Monday, previous to which there was not much necessity for debate; and to-morrow
Ohio (United States) (search for this): article 1
iments just uttered by a representative of the West. The sign indicated that his former efforts were not misdirected. Mr. Neblett also returned to the gentleman from Barbour his sincere thanks, in the name of the people he represented, for his patriotic and eloquent remarks. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, thanked both gentlemen for their complimentary allusions to the Northwest; but he was afraid the Northwest was not so sound as they thought. He came from a Northwestern county, near the Ohio river, and he would say that he was the only man in that region who was able to get a position in this body, upon the Crittenden compromise even. They pronounced him a disunionist, per se, for defending that proposition. They will hear of no compromise or compact that recognizes the right to dissolve the Union. He would say to the gentleman from Princess Anne that his oft-repeated sentiment of fighting in the Union was received by his people with a thrill of joy. They were, however, sound on
Harrison, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
y to read the Farewell Address of the Father of his Country, he would offer the following resolution: Resolved, That when this Convention adjourn, it adjourn to meet again on Monday next. Mr. Fisher moved to amend by inserting "Saturday" in the place of Monday. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, was opposed to adjourning over at all. It was rumored that the Peace Conference was about to conclude its labors, and he thought no time should be lost, in view of that fact. If the gentleman from Harrison (Mr. Carlile) wanted to hear Washington's Farewell Address, he would agree to go to his room and read it to him. Mr. Dorman explained why he should vote against adjourning over to Monday. A resolution was laid on the table yesterday in consideration of the absence of the gentleman from Jefferson, who would probably be in his seat on Saturday, when the resolution could be called up. The amendment was adopted, and the resolution, as amended, passed. Invitation. A letter wa
Rockingham, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
y. The President said the resolution authorized the publication of the debates. He would make no contract inconsistent with the resolution. Mr. Johnson expressed himself as satisfied with the reply. Committee on compensation. The President announced the following committee, under a resolution adopted yesterday, to inquire and report upon the compensation for the officers of the Convention: Messrs. Johnson of Richmond, Hubbard of Ohio, Gregory of King William, Coffman of Rockingham, and Sheffey of Smythe. Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, in the Chair. Report from the Committee on elections. Mr. Haymond, from the Committee on Elections, submitted a report embodying "a list of the persons who seem to have been elected to the Convention, and the certificates of such election." The Committee add: John D. Sharp is elected from the county of Lee, but his seat in the Convention is contested by M. B. D. Lane, of said county of Lee, and his petition and notice of con
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