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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 22, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
publication of the debates. He would make no contract inconsistent with the resolution. Mr. Johnson expressed himself as satisfied with the reply. Committee on compensation. The President announced the following committee, under a resolution adopted yesterday, to inquire and report upon the compensation for the officers of the Convention: Messrs. Johnson of Richmond, Hubbard of Ohio, Gregory of King William, Coffman of Rockingham, and Sheffey of Smythe. Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, in the Chair. Report from the Committee on elections. Mr. Haymond, from the Committee on Elections, submitted a report embodying "a list of the persons who seem to have been elected to the Convention, and the certificates of such election." The Committee add: John D. Sharp is elected from the county of Lee, but his seat in the Convention is contested by M. B. D. Lane, of said county of Lee, and his petition and notice of contest has been referred to the Committee for examination
Timberlake (search for this): article 1
the scene of the conflagration, such was the combustible nature of the materials it had to operate on, that the flames were not subdued before the building occupied by Mr. Mayo, and one adjoining, also a tobacco factory, used by Messrs. Mason & Timberlake, were entirely consumed, together with their respective contents. The building used by Mr. Mayo, was built many years since by Mr. Edmund Brown, (one of the most famous tobacco manufacturers of by-gone days, and the proprietors of "Brown'sstock, including about 120 boxes of manufactured tobacco that was to have been shipped yesterday. He had an insurance of only $6,000, half the amount in the Valley Office, and half in the office of the Insurance Company of Alexandria. Mason & Timberlake had an insurance on their stock of $2,000, which, we presume, will not cover their loss by a great deal. Both buildings were owned by Mr. Abraham Warwick, who had an insurance on them of $11,000 in the Mutual Office. The fire was no doubt the
James M. Mason (search for this): article 1
all haste to the scene of the conflagration, such was the combustible nature of the materials it had to operate on, that the flames were not subdued before the building occupied by Mr. Mayo, and one adjoining, also a tobacco factory, used by Messrs. Mason & Timberlake, were entirely consumed, together with their respective contents. The building used by Mr. Mayo, was built many years since by Mr. Edmund Brown, (one of the most famous tobacco manufacturers of by-gone days, and the propriettures and stock, including about 120 boxes of manufactured tobacco that was to have been shipped yesterday. He had an insurance of only $6,000, half the amount in the Valley Office, and half in the office of the Insurance Company of Alexandria. Mason & Timberlake had an insurance on their stock of $2,000, which, we presume, will not cover their loss by a great deal. Both buildings were owned by Mr. Abraham Warwick, who had an insurance on them of $11,000 in the Mutual Office. The fire was n
Henry Clay (search for this): article 1
Mr. Mayo, and one adjoining, also a tobacco factory, used by Messrs. Mason & Timberlake, were entirely consumed, together with their respective contents. The building used by Mr. Mayo, was built many years since by Mr. Edmund Brown, (one of the most famous tobacco manufacturers of by-gone days, and the proprietors of "Brown's best, " well known to all lovers of the weed,) at a cost of $30,000. It was finished in 1838. Before being occupied, the Whig party gave their great leader, Hon. Henry Clay, a dinner within its walls, that famous orator making on the occasion one of his most happy forensic displays, the memory of which is extant even to this day. Mr. Mayo's loss is very heavy, only a portion being covered by insurance. Everything was burnt, books, fixtures and stock, including about 120 boxes of manufactured tobacco that was to have been shipped yesterday. He had an insurance of only $6,000, half the amount in the Valley Office, and half in the office of the Insuran
operate on, that the flames were not subdued before the building occupied by Mr. Mayo, and one adjoining, also a tobacco factory, used by Messrs. Mason & Timberlake, were entirely consumed, together with their respective contents. The building used by Mr. Mayo, was built many years since by Mr. Edmund Brown, (one of the most famous tobacco manufacturers of by-gone days, and the proprietors of "Brown's best, " well known to all lovers of the weed,) at a cost of $30,000. It was finished in 1838. Before being occupied, the Whig party gave their great leader, Hon. Henry Clay, a dinner within its walls, that famous orator making on the occasion one of his most happy forensic displays, the memory of which is extant even to this day. Mr. Mayo's loss is very heavy, only a portion being covered by insurance. Everything was burnt, books, fixtures and stock, including about 120 boxes of manufactured tobacco that was to have been shipped yesterday. He had an insurance of only $6,000,
Abraham Warwick (search for this): article 1
very heavy, only a portion being covered by insurance. Everything was burnt, books, fixtures and stock, including about 120 boxes of manufactured tobacco that was to have been shipped yesterday. He had an insurance of only $6,000, half the amount in the Valley Office, and half in the office of the Insurance Company of Alexandria. Mason & Timberlake had an insurance on their stock of $2,000, which, we presume, will not cover their loss by a great deal. Both buildings were owned by Mr. Abraham Warwick, who had an insurance on them of $11,000 in the Mutual Office. The fire was no doubt the work of an incendiary, as all that was used in the day-time was extinguished before the hands left work the previous night. Had the wind blown in the direction of the Petersburg depot, that building would have been also consumed. It is probable that the interior of the houses were nearly burned before the alarm was given. The steam fire-engine was on hand, and demonstrated its claim as a great
J. H. F. Mayo (search for this): article 1
erday morning, by an alarm which was found to be caused by the burning of the large brick tobacco factory occupied by J. H. F. Mayo, Esq., on the South side of the Basin. Though the firemen repaired in all haste to the scene of the conflagration, smbustible nature of the materials it had to operate on, that the flames were not subdued before the building occupied by Mr. Mayo, and one adjoining, also a tobacco factory, used by Messrs. Mason & Timberlake, were entirely consumed, together with their respective contents. The building used by Mr. Mayo, was built many years since by Mr. Edmund Brown, (one of the most famous tobacco manufacturers of by-gone days, and the proprietors of "Brown's best, " well known to all lovers of the weed,)tor making on the occasion one of his most happy forensic displays, the memory of which is extant even to this day. Mr. Mayo's loss is very heavy, only a portion being covered by insurance. Everything was burnt, books, fixtures and stock, inclu
Edmund Brown (search for this): article 1
building occupied by Mr. Mayo, and one adjoining, also a tobacco factory, used by Messrs. Mason & Timberlake, were entirely consumed, together with their respective contents. The building used by Mr. Mayo, was built many years since by Mr. Edmund Brown, (one of the most famous tobacco manufacturers of by-gone days, and the proprietors of "Brown's best, " well known to all lovers of the weed,) at a cost of $30,000. It was finished in 1838. Before being occupied, the Whig party gave their gBrown's best, " well known to all lovers of the weed,) at a cost of $30,000. It was finished in 1838. Before being occupied, the Whig party gave their great leader, Hon. Henry Clay, a dinner within its walls, that famous orator making on the occasion one of his most happy forensic displays, the memory of which is extant even to this day. Mr. Mayo's loss is very heavy, only a portion being covered by insurance. Everything was burnt, books, fixtures and stock, including about 120 boxes of manufactured tobacco that was to have been shipped yesterday. He had an insurance of only $6,000, half the amount in the Valley Office, and half in the
The Convention. A series of resolutions on the National difficulties, offered by Mr. Woods, of Barbour, gave prominence to the proceedings yesterday. They declare the right of secession; and affirm that it is the duty of the Government to recognize the seceded States as independent sovereignties. The resolutions, which were received with manifestations of favor in the Convention, were referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. To-day, being the anniversary of Washington's birth, there will be no session of the Convention, a resolution having been adopted to adjourn to Saturday.
The Convention. A series of resolutions on the National difficulties, offered by Mr. Woods, of Barbour, gave prominence to the proceedings yesterday. They declare the right of secession; and affirm that it is the duty of the Government to recognize the seceded States as independent sovereignties. The resolutions, which were received with manifestations of favor in the Convention, were referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. To-day, being the anniversary of Washington's birth, there will be no session of the Convention, a resolution having been adopted to adjourn to Saturday.
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