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February 22nd (search for this): article 1
emarks, in which he also dwelt upon the glories of the past; but said that his constituents, smarting under the wrongs of the Black Republican party, were prepared to resist. Mr. Woods' resolutions were then referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Washington's birthday. Mr. Carlile said that as the Committee on Federal Relations would not probably be prepared to report before Monday, previous to which there was not much necessity for debate; and to-morrow being the 22d of February, when, he presumed, some of us would like to have an opportunity to read the Farewell Address of the Father of his Country, he would offer the following resolution: Resolved, That when this Convention adjourn, it adjourn to meet again on Monday next. Mr. Fisher moved to amend by inserting "Saturday" in the place of Monday. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, was opposed to adjourning over at all. It was rumored that the Peace Conference was about to conclude its labors, and he thought no
to a committee, or for such other action as might be deemed proper. The communication was read by the Clerk. It proposes to publish the matter at the following rates: For composition, per column, $3.25, (the rate allowed by the Convention of 1850;) for reporting, per column, $7.50, was paid to the Congressional Globe;) press work, per token, $2 ½ cents; for paper, the same as allowed the Public Printer. It also proposes to furnish copies for mailing at two cents each, and to republish the learned it from the great men who laid the foundation of the Government. Mr. W. quoted with much effect, in enlarging upon this point, from Washington's Farewell Address, and from the words of Clay after the passage of the Compromise measures of 1850. Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, made some remarks, in which he also dwelt upon the glories of the past; but said that his constituents, smarting under the wrongs of the Black Republican party, were prepared to resist. Mr. Woods' resolutions
January 14th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
upon by the Committee. The Committee therefore report that the said John D. Sharp, having the official return of election for said county of Lee, is prima facie entitled to occupy a seat in the Convention, until otherwise ordered by the Convention, on the final decision of said contest. The report was laid on the table and ordered to be printed. Mr. Haymond, from the same committee, offered the following ordinance for adoption: Whereas, the General Assembly, on the 14th day of January, 1861, passed an act entitled "an act for electing members of a Convention and to convene the same." and whereas, by the eighth section of said act it is provided that "in the case of a contested election, the same shall be governed in all respects by the existing laws in regard to contested elections in the House of Delegates, unless otherwise ordered by the Convention;" and whereas, it seems to the Convention that the said existing laws in regard to contested elections in the House of D
February 21st, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
The State Convention.eight day. Thursday, Feb. 21, 1861. The Convention was called to order by the President, at the usual hour. Prayer by the Rev. Geo. W. Noleet, of the M. E. Church. Printing the debates. The President stated, that in pursuance of the resolution adopted yesterday, he had an interview with the editors of the Richmond Enquirer, and had received from them a statement in writing. From want of knowledge of the subject, he felt incompetent to make the contract. He would therefore submit it to the Convention, to be referred to a committee, or for such other action as might be deemed proper. The communication was read by the Clerk. It proposes to publish the matter at the following rates: For composition, per column, $3.25, (the rate allowed by the Convention of 1850;) for reporting, per column, $7.50, was paid to the Congressional Globe;) press work, per token, $2 ½ cents; for paper, the same as allowed the Public Printer. It also proposes to
January, 7 AD (search for this): article 1
ess Anne that his oft-repeated sentiment of fighting in the Union was received by his people with a thrill of joy. They were, however, sound on the question of State-Rights; but their locality did not favor the owning of slave property. The terminus of the underground railroad was opposite his county, and he had heard a man boasting that he was one of the engineers, and that he had liberated many slaves. He (Mr. H.) was in favor of presenting an ultimatum to the North, to last until the 1st of July, when, if it were refused, let the State go out, and take the Constitution with her. Mr. Wise regretted that his sentiment of fighting in the Union had been the cause of making any in the Northwest willing to submit to the wrongs which they now suffer.--He went on to show, from the Constitution of the United States, that his position of fighting in the Union was right. When this State is ready to declare that she is in such imminent danger of invasion as will admit of no delay, then
Farewell Address (search for this): article 1
ms, to their record of the past, and said if it was a fault to love the Union, they had learned it from the great men who laid the foundation of the Government. Mr. W. quoted with much effect, in enlarging upon this point, from Washington's Farewell Address, and from the words of Clay after the passage of the Compromise measures of 1850. Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, made some remarks, in which he also dwelt upon the glories of the past; but said that his constituents, smarting under the wronosed to adjourning over at all. It was rumored that the Peace Conference was about to conclude its labors, and he thought no time should be lost, in view of that fact. If the gentleman from Harrison (Mr. Carlile) wanted to hear Washington's Farewell Address, he would agree to go to his room and read it to him. Mr. Dorman explained why he should vote against adjourning over to Monday. A resolution was laid on the table yesterday in consideration of the absence of the gentleman from Jeffers
to correct some remarks of his on the previous day, which he said were erroneously reported in the Richmond Enquirer. He merely wished to put himself right — not to find fault with the reporter. The National difficulties. Mr. Woods, of Barbour, submitted the following resolutions: Resolved, That the allegiance which the citizens of Virginia owe to the Federal Government of the United States of America, is subordinate to that due to Virginia, and may therefore be lawfully withdraw gush of his feelings which prompted him to acknowledge the patriotic sentiments just uttered by a representative of the West. The sign indicated that his former efforts were not misdirected. Mr. Neblett also returned to the gentleman from Barbour his sincere thanks, in the name of the people he represented, for his patriotic and eloquent remarks. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, thanked both gentlemen for their complimentary allusions to the Northwest; but he was afraid the Northwest was not so
f the past; but said that his constituents, smarting under the wrongs of the Black Republican party, were prepared to resist. Mr. Woods' resolutions were then referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Washington's birthday. Mr. Carlile said that as the Committee on Federal Relations would not probably be prepared to report before Monday, previous to which there was not much necessity for debate; and to-morrow being the 22d of February, when, he presumed, some of us would likf Monday. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, was opposed to adjourning over at all. It was rumored that the Peace Conference was about to conclude its labors, and he thought no time should be lost, in view of that fact. If the gentleman from Harrison (Mr. Carlile) wanted to hear Washington's Farewell Address, he would agree to go to his room and read it to him. Mr. Dorman explained why he should vote against adjourning over to Monday. A resolution was laid on the table yesterday in consideration
Henry Clay (search for this): article 1
e more loyal than those of the Northwest; none more ready to fight, if necessary. He spoke for his own people, and he believed such was the sentiment of the whole Trans-Allegheny region. He alluded, in eloquent terms, to their record of the past, and said if it was a fault to love the Union, they had learned it from the great men who laid the foundation of the Government. Mr. W. quoted with much effect, in enlarging upon this point, from Washington's Farewell Address, and from the words of Clay after the passage of the Compromise measures of 1850. Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, made some remarks, in which he also dwelt upon the glories of the past; but said that his constituents, smarting under the wrongs of the Black Republican party, were prepared to resist. Mr. Woods' resolutions were then referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Washington's birthday. Mr. Carlile said that as the Committee on Federal Relations would not probably be prepared to report before
Convention, by its vote, had determined to publish the proceedings, and had indicated the Enquirer as the organ of publication. He moved, by way of relieving the President from his difficulty, that the Secretary of the Commonwealth, who had large experience in such matters, be authorized to execute the contract. Mr. Staples moved as an amendment that the subject be referred to a committee of five. Mr. Wise maintained that any change in the resolution would be out of order. Mr. Clemens, rising to a question of order, said the motion of the gentleman from Middlesex, as well as the amendment of the gentleman from Patrick, were inconsistent with the resolution adopted by the Convention. In order to entertain such motions the resolution would have to be reconsidered. After further remarks and suggestions, the President remarked that he would proceed to execute the contract, as directed by the resolution. Mr. Johnson, of Richmond, said he had voted for the resolut
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