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Fort Bedford (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 71
h for the nonpayment of taxes for the year 1860; also, the aggregate amount of taxes on such delinquent taxes. The National difficulties. Mr. Goggin, of Bedford, called up the resolutions offered by Mr. Moore, which were laid on the table yesterday. Mr. Goode, of Bedford, being entitled to the floor, proceeded to sayBedford, being entitled to the floor, proceeded to say that it was not his purpose to speak to the resolutions, but to reply to the gentleman from Rockbridge, (Mr. Moore.) He regretted that his physical condition rendered him wholly unable to do justice to a case of such vast interest, and regretted also that circumstances prevented him from concluding his remarks yesterday. He hopedtion and disgrace; and his fervent prayer was that Heaven would protect the noble old Common wealth. Mr. Goode having closed his remarks. Mr. Goggin, of Bedford, arose to address the Convention. He proceeded to say that he had come here to discharge a high and responsible duty as one of those who had been clothed with th
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 71
wer at Washington or elsewhere is brought to bear on this Common wealth, all here will stand united as one man. For himself, he would say that if any coercion be attempted, either directly or indirectly, as he would say for every one here, that it would be repelled. Mr. Goggin reviewed at considerable length the arguments of the Southern Commissioners, for whom he expressed the highest personal respect. He cited statistics to show that King Cotton had a rival in colonies with which Great Britain had made treaties, and to show that the argument contemplating her fostering care was fallacious. He then alluded to the tobacco and other great interests of Virginia, which ought not to be made subject to King Cotton; and the consideration of their protection would not permit Virginians to become reconciled to the introduction of Yankees in place of the negroes, who would, as had been told us, all be required to cultivate the cotton of the South. To obviate all the difficulties, h
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 71
he constellation. With natural advantages unsurpassed — with unlimited manufacturing facilities — she could carve out for herself a brilliant destiny. With every advantage of soll and climate — with a grave, public-spirited and high minded population — it required no prophet, nor the son of a prophet, to predict that Virginia would jump at once into the front rank of greatness and power. Manufactures would be transferred from the North to the waters of the Tappahannock and the James, and Norfolk would become the greatest seaport in the world. Let her not, then, submit to the rule of Abraham Lincoln, but assert her rights and maintain them in the fear of God. He regretted that the gentleman had referred to party politics. We had nothing to do with party here. Whatever may be hidden in the future, the same destiny awaits the whole people of Virginia, be they Whigs, Douglas or Breckinridge men. Let bygones be bygones. Let us endeavor to rise up and stand in united majesty, a
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 71
the resolutions offered by Mr. Moore, which were laid on the table yesterday. Mr. Goode, of Bedford, being entitled to the floor, proceeded to say that it was not his purpose to speak to the resolutions, but to reply to the gentleman from Rockbridge, (Mr. Moore.) He regretted that his physical condition rendered him wholly unable to do justice to a case of such vast interest, and regretted also that circumstances prevented him from concluding his remarks yesterday. He hoped the citizens wshould go with her Southern sisters. They are bone of her bone, and flesh of her flesh. Could Virginia desert them now? As well might it be asked could the mother desert and forget her own offspring. He regretted that the gentleman from Rockbridge was not in his seat. He would, however, notice a few of his objections to going into a Southern Confederacy. With regard to there-opening of the African slave trade, Mr. G. proceeded to say, that every Convention in the seceded States had pro
Washington (United States) (search for this): article 71
find if there was no healing balm in that Constitution which, on other occasions, he had sworn to maintain. Although it was an old fashioned argument to refer to the sentiments of the Father of his Country, he might be excused for saying that he had more faith in George Washington than in any living statesman. He must still be permitted to go to him for counsel. He had looked to the Constitution, and found that it provided a remedy for any evil that might be brought upon the country. In Washington's Farewell Address is the following language; "To the efficacy and permanency of your Union a Government for the whole is indispensable. No alliance, however strict, between the parts, can be an adequate substitute; they must inevitably experience the interactions and interruptions which all alliances, in all time have experienced. Sensible of this momentous truth, you have improved upon your first essay. by the adoption of a Constitution of Government better calculated than you
Ohio (United States) (search for this): article 71
laid down by the Provisional Government would be permanent.--He complained of the North--he denounced her. But had not the South sometimes violated the laws by the importation of African slaves; and if this had been done before, was there any security that it would not be done under a Provisional Southern Government?--With the competition to which Virginia would be thus subjected, she would stand in still further danger from those whom she made strangers and aliens on the other side of the Ohio River. Mr. Goggin also alluded to the threatened prohibition of the inter-State slave trade, and to other subjects in connection there with. The time was past when we should ask the people of the North to go into consultation; but had we asked it, and had it been denied us, we should not to-day have witnessed the spectacle here of divided counsels. The whole South would have been united, and peace and quietness restored. As matters now stood, he conceived the conference of the border State
Mount Vernon, Knox County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 71
me arrived for its exercise, he would stand side by side with them in vindicating the honor of Virginia and the South. But he desired that every constitutional remedy should be exhausted first. The speaker proceeded to allude to the glories of the past; to the feelings derived there from which enabled him to take by the hand citizens in every portion of the country and call them brothers; and to the patriotism of the women of all sections which prompted them to preserve the shrine at Mount Vernon, where he hoped they might always come and pour out their united prayers for the protection of the Union. In reference to the causes which produced the present state of affairs, he said he might call up many, but appealed to his hearers rather to act the part of the wise men in the temple, who took care of the jewels without stopping to ask who applied the torch. In proceeding, he spoke of Abraham Lincoln, whom he knew in Congress, and his acquaintance had led him to anticipate
St. Paul's church (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 71
Virginia State Convention.Eleventh day. Tuesday,Feb. 26, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 12 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Minnegerode, of St. Paul's Church. Resolution. Mr. Brows, of Preston, offered the following, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Auditor of Public Accounts be requested to furnish to the Convention a statement showing the aggregate number of persons returned delinquent by the Sheriffs of the different counties of the Common wealth for the nonpayment of taxes for the year 1860; also, the aggregate amount of taxes on such delinquent taxes. The National difficulties. Mr. Goggin, of Bedford, called up the resolutions offered by Mr. Moore, which were laid on the table yesterday. Mr. Goode, of Bedford, being entitled to the floor, proceeded to say that it was not his purpose to speak to the resolutions, but to reply to the gentleman from Rockbridge, (Mr. Moore.) He regretted that his physical condition rendered
James Madison (search for this): article 71
s of others, in whatever position he might assume, that there was no warrant in the Constitution by which a State had the right to secede from the Union at all. Though this was his position, he would be ready at the proper time to co-operate with those who differed with him. In the event of the failure of the constitutional remedy, there could remain but one resort, and that was an appeal from the compact to the law of self-preservation. In this connection he quoted from the writings of James Madison. The speaker went on to say that he believed in the doctrine of self-preservation — the right to defend life, liberty and property — to defend wife and children. That right had never been taken from us, but it was an extraordinary right, reserved to operate when the constitution fails. He believed that secessionists would have no better protection than the right of revolution; and when the time arrived for its exercise, he would stand side by side with them in vindicating the honor
is hearers rather to act the part of the wise men in the temple, who took care of the jewels without stopping to ask who applied the torch. In proceeding, he spoke of Abraham Lincoln, whom he knew in Congress, and his acquaintance had led him to anticipate better things than had lately been developed. He thought, since his recent speeches, that there was no hope for the future through him.--With regard to the collection of Federal troops at Washington, he said it was unfortunate that Gen. Scott was called there. He could pledge his right hand to Abraham Lincoln that there was not a man in Virginia who proposed by force to prevent the consummation of his inauguration. Yet when the power at Washington or elsewhere is brought to bear on this Common wealth, all here will stand united as one man. For himself, he would say that if any coercion be attempted, either directly or indirectly, as he would say for every one here, that it would be repelled. Mr. Goggin reviewed at consid
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