hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 22 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Indiana (Indiana, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Missouri (Missouri, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 1, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 240 total hits in 58 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): article 12
States of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois, and Kansas--10. Nays--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin and Iowa--9. The other clauses of the compromise were adopted by heavier affirmative votes, indicae Rhode Island, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio and Illinois. The States that voted against it were Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, North Carolina and Iowa. The delegations that did not vote were from Kansas, New York, Missouri and Indiana. Had it been necessary, the votes of New Hampshire and Indiana would have been in the affirmative. So probably Missouri. Vermont is four to one for having Congress refer the propositions of the Convention to the people of the States, as recommended.--Messrs. Boutwell and Crowninshield, of Massachusetts, did not, towards the last, show the
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 12
clined voting. The vote stood as follows: Ayes--The States of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois, and Kansas--10. Nays--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin and Iowa--9. The other clauses of the cxed the vote therein. The States that voted for the first section were Rhode Island, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio and Illinois. The States that voted against it were Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, North Carolina and Iowa. The delegations that did nhe Treasury in 1833, but the Senate had refused to confirm the appointment. It has consequently been his privilege to adminster the oath of office to Presidents Van Buren, Harrison, Tyler, Polk, Taylor, Fillmore, Pierce, and Buchanan, and on Monday next, (Deo Volente,) he will administer it to Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois.
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 12
hilst it was recommended to Congress by a unanimous vote. Virginia and North Carolina, by a majority of their delegations, voted against the controverted sectionsas--10. Nays--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin and Iowa--9. The other clauses of the compromise weriana declining to vote, Kansas and Missouri being divided, and Virginia and North Carolina voting against it. Thus, had not Indiana declined to vote, and New York andvention now in session at Richmond. Judge Ruffin and Gen. Morehead, of North Carolina, also entered a strong protest against the vote of that State being cast agt were Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, North Carolina and Iowa. The delegations that did not vote were from Kansas, New York, Mi the majority of the Virginia delegation were Messrs. Summers and Rives; of North Carolina, Messrs. Ruffin and Morehead. None expressed dissent openly in the Kentucky
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 12
ce, they declined voting. The vote stood as follows: Ayes--The States of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois, and Kansas--10. Nays--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin and Iowa--9. The other clausevention. Against each is annexed the vote therein. The States that voted for the first section were Rhode Island, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio and Illinois. The States that voted against it were Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, North Carolina and Iowa the crowds that are pouring in by every train they will be compelled to take to the hearth-rugs for sleeping accommodations. Last night ex-Senator Bell, of Tennessee, Messrs. Douglas, Guthrie and Rives, and Governor Hicks and others, urgently appealed to Mr. Lincoln to interpose his influence for a settlement of the pending d
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 12
nd, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois, and Kansas--10. Nays--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin and Iowa--9. The other clauses of the comprthat clause which provides for the payment for runaway slaves whose recovery is obstructed. Massachusetts, to cap the climax, voted, with several of the New England States, against the clause which the opening of the slave trade, or the introduction of coolie apprentices into the country. Massachusetts also voted against the clause calculated to check filibustering by the acquisition of new teky, Ohio and Illinois. The States that voted against it were Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, North Carolina and Iowa. The delegations that did not vote were frovention to the people of the States, as recommended.--Messrs. Boutwell and Crowninshield, of Massachusetts, did not, towards the last, show the bitter feeling exhibited by some of their colleagues.
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): article 12
The States of Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois, and Kansas--10. Nays--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin and Iowa--9. very in the Territories. This was passed by a vote of ayes 9; nays 8--New York being divided, Indiana declining to vote, Kansas and Missouri being divided, and Virginia and North Carolina voting against it. Thus, had not Indiana declined to vote, and New York and Kansas lost their votes by division — all of which was doubtless done to allow it to pass — it would have been defeated. Messrs. William C. Rives, and Summers, of Virginia, protested against the vote of that State being cast againire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, North Carolina and Iowa. The delegations that did not vote were from Kansas, New York, Missouri and Indiana. Had it been necessary, the votes of New Hampshire and Indiana would have been in th
Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): article 12
re, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois, and Kansas--10. Nays--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin and Iowa--9. The other clauses of the compromise were adopted by heavier affirmative votes, indicating the variety of opinions entertained by the Commissioners. As, nessee, Kentucky, Ohio and Illinois. The States that voted against it were Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, North Carolina and Iowa. The delegations that did not vote were from Kansas, New York, Missouri and Indiana. Had it been necessary, the votes of New Hampshire and Indiana would havene expressed dissent openly in the Kentucky and Tennessee delegations. In the Ohio delegation Mr. Chase was left almost alone. He exhibited much disappointment. Iowa was ultra, as were two of the Illinois delegates. From a variety of Washington dispatches, we take the following: The Mayor of Washington has been compe
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 12
t the whole had such a vote have been allowed. The New York vote was divided: Indiana and Missouri declined to vote. The Missouri Commissioners, or at least a majoitories. This was passed by a vote of ayes 9; nays 8--New York being divided, Indiana declining to vote, Kansas and Missouri being divided, and Virginia and North Carolina voting against it. Thus, had not Indiana declined to vote, and New York and Kansas lost their votes by division — all of which was doubtless done to allow itt the views of a large majority of the people of the State. The action of Indiana requires some explanation. The delegates were instructed not to vote on the Ta. The delegations that did not vote were from Kansas, New York, Missouri and Indiana. Had it been necessary, the votes of New Hampshire and Indiana would haveIndiana would have been in the affirmative. So probably Missouri. Vermont is four to one for having Congress refer the propositions of the Convention to the people of the States, as
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): article 12
ticut, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois, and Kansas--10. Nays--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin and Iowa--9. The other clauses of the compronnsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio and Illinois. The States that voted against it were Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, North Carolina and Iowa. The delegations that did not vote were from Kansas, New York, Missouri and Indiana. Had it been necessary, the votes of New Hampshire and Indiana would have been in the affirmative. So probably Missouri. Vermont is four to one for having Congress refer the propositions of the Conventios since coming to Washington.--Mr. Spratt, of Connecticut, dissented from his colleagues. So did Mr. Chamberlain, of New Hampshire. Maine was straight-out bitter. Mr. Field, of New York, being necessarily absent, the delegation was at odds, and di
New England (United States) (search for this): article 12
ssee, Illinois, and Kansas--10. Nays--Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Virginia, North Carolina, Ohio, Wisconsin and Iowa--9. The other clauses of the compromise were adopted by heavier affirmative votes, indicating the variety of opinions entertained by the Commissioners. As, for instance, Virginia voted against that clause which provides for the payment for runaway slaves whose recovery is obstructed. Massachusetts, to cap the climax, voted, with several of the New England States, against the clause which prohibits the opening of the slave trade, or the introduction of coolie apprentices into the country. Massachusetts also voted against the clause calculated to check filibustering by the acquisition of new territory. After the whole plan of compromise, as above given, had been passed, a statement was drawn up to accompany its presentation to Congress. This statement sets forth that the Conference having adopted "the following proposed amendments to
1 2 3 4 5 6