hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Abraham Lincoln 28 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 28 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
James Moore 12 0 Browse Search
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Ellen Bateman 9 1 Browse Search
John T. Anderson 9 1 Browse Search
Illinois (Illinois, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 85 total hits in 36 results.

1 2 3 4
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 1
throughout all the Northern States. Their emissaries under every guise were sent among us to incite our slaves to insurrection and rebellion. None could ever forget the excitement consequent upon the Southampton tragedy in 1831. But antislavery even then did not retrace its steps.--A few years later the National halls were flooded with petitions for the abolition of slavery, and peace was only restored by concessions of Southern men. In 1850, after Southern blood had watered the plains of Mexico, the agitation was again renewed, and to quiet it, the South received California into the Union, with a constitution which virtually excluded us forever from that valuable territory. In 1859, a band of Northern men, in pursuance of a plan that had long been on foot — a band of armed men — made an incursion into Virginia, to excite insurrection, murder her peaceful citizens, and overthrow the Constitution of the State. But this did not arouse the conservative feelings of the North. The maj
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ted that the first business in order was the consideration of the resolutions of Mr. Moore, of Rockbridge, and that Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, was entitled to the floor. The State Constitution. then proceeded to the consideration of the resolutions offered some days ago by Mr. Moore, of Rockbridge. Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, being entitled to the floor, resumed his remarks. While speeouthern people were to be put in jeopardy. He deprecated the sentiments of the gentleman from Rockbridge, contemplating party issues on this floor. To the Democratic party he would say that it had bo sell their birthright for the spools of party. He denied the position of the gentleman from Rockbridge that the Cotton States sought the aid of Virginia for a selfish purpose. It was a question for some days where the gentleman from Rockbridge would like to go; but on yesterday he defined his position. He believed it was now generally understood that he would not go with the South. He wo
Northampton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
s effect would be to protract the session interminably, while he doubted not that there was enough newspaper enterprise in Richmond to print all that was necessary to be printed without burdening the State with the expense. Mr. Fisher, of Northampton, opposed the resolution, and moved that it be laid upon the table. On this motion the yeas and nays were called, and resulted — yeas 30, nays 62. So the Convention refused to lay the resolution upon the table. Mr. Montague, of Mople for ratification, by which Virginia shall resume all the powers delegated by her to the Federal Government, and declare her connexion with that Government dissolved. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Fisher, of Northampton, offered the following, which were likewise referred: Resolved, That in the opinion of this Convention, any attempt on the part of the Federal Government to collect revenue on goods in transit to any port or ports in any of the States wh
Bedford, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
he right to resume her sovereign powers, whenever her rights should be invaded. But in any event, they had the right, under the Declaration of Independence, to resist oppression and wrong, come from whence they may. Virginia had none of the responsibility for the present state of affairs — no stains upon her garments. Whatever might be the result, Virginia could say to the North, in the language of Macbeth to Banquo, "Thou canst not say I did it." Federal Relations. Mr. Goode, of Bedford, said his spirits were weighed down by the consideration that before the Convention of Virginia assembled on Monday, a Black Republican will have been inaugurated as her President. Poor old Virginia! ere that time she will have bowed her neck to the yoke and passed under the triumphal car of a Black Republic. He therefore asked, in the name of his people, that the following preamble and resolution might be spread upon the record: Whereas, the people of Virginia, in Convention assem
Henrico (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
e, and that no exemption of any property from taxation shall be had without the vote of a majority of all the members elected to each House of the General Assembly. Resolved, That a committee, to consist of thirteen members, to be selected from the different section of the State, be appointed, who shall report to the Convention such amendments to the Constitution of the State as will effect the object indicated in the foregoing resolution. Printing the debates. Mr. Wickham, of Henrico, asked the privilege of offering the following resolution: Resolved, That a committee of five be appointed by the President of the Convention, to whom shall be referred the contract between the said President and the proprietors of the Richmond Enquirer in regard to the publication of the debates of the Convention — the said committee shall have power to send for persons and papers, and shall make report to this Convention. Mr. Wickham stated his object to be, in offering the re
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 1
America, or any attempt to take the forts, arsenals, dock-yards, or munitions of war, in possession of the said States that have withdrawn from the Federal Union, would be the initiation of civil war, and that this Commonwealth will not be an indifferent spectator in such war; but will take part in the same to the full extent of her military ability, in behalf of her Southern slaveholding sisters that have seceded from the Federal Union. Resolved, further, in the opinion of this Convention, that it is the duty of the Federal Government at the earliest practicable moment to enter into negotiation with the authorities of the Southern Confederacy for the transfer of Fort Sumter and Fort Pickens to said Confederacy, and for an equitable division of the public property and public burdens of the United States of America, at the time of the withdrawal of the States of the said Southern Confederacy from the Union, between them. On motion of Mr. Tredway, the Convention adjourned.
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
ffect would be to protract the session interminably, while he doubted not that there was enough newspaper enterprise in Richmond to print all that was necessary to be printed without burdening the State with the expense. Mr. Fisher, of Northampton, opposed the resolution, and moved that it be laid upon the table. On this motion the yeas and nays were called, and resulted — yeas 30, nays 62. So the Convention refused to lay the resolution upon the table. Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, opposed the resolution. Mr. Branch, of Petersburg, and Mr. Early, of Franklin, advocated it, after which the vote was taken and the resolution passed. Contested election. Mr. Haymond, of Marion, by leave, presented some papers relative to the contested election in Lee county, which, on his motion, were referred to the Committee on Elections. Unfinished business. The Convention then proceeded to the consideration of the resolutions offered some days ago by Mr. Moore, of
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
: Resolved, That in the opinion of this Convention, any attempt on the part of the Federal Government to collect revenue on goods in transit to any port or ports in any of the States which have withdrawn from the Confederacy of the United States of America, or any attempt to take the forts, arsenals, dock-yards, or munitions of war, in possession of the said States that have withdrawn from the Federal Union, would be the initiation of civil war, and that this Commonwealth will not be an inn, that it is the duty of the Federal Government at the earliest practicable moment to enter into negotiation with the authorities of the Southern Confederacy for the transfer of Fort Sumter and Fort Pickens to said Confederacy, and for an equitable division of the public property and public burdens of the United States of America, at the time of the withdrawal of the States of the said Southern Confederacy from the Union, between them. On motion of Mr. Tredway, the Convention adjourned.
Mecklenburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Borrows, of the First Baptist Church. The President (Mr. Gogin in the Chair) stated that the first business in order was the consideration of the resolutions of Mr. Moore, of Rockbridge, and that Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, was entitled to the floor. The State Constitution. Mr. Turner, of Jackson, (Mr. Goode having given way,) offered the following resolutions, which, on his motion, were laid upon the table. Resolved. That it is expedient and properounty, which, on his motion, were referred to the Committee on Elections. Unfinished business. The Convention then proceeded to the consideration of the resolutions offered some days ago by Mr. Moore, of Rockbridge. Mr. Goode, of Mecklenburg, being entitled to the floor, resumed his remarks. While speeches had been made calculated to inflame excitement against those with whom he hoped we would soon be united, he felt indisposed, however little weight his remarks might have, to be
California (California, United States) (search for this): article 1
nt among us to incite our slaves to insurrection and rebellion. None could ever forget the excitement consequent upon the Southampton tragedy in 1831. But antislavery even then did not retrace its steps.--A few years later the National halls were flooded with petitions for the abolition of slavery, and peace was only restored by concessions of Southern men. In 1850, after Southern blood had watered the plains of Mexico, the agitation was again renewed, and to quiet it, the South received California into the Union, with a constitution which virtually excluded us forever from that valuable territory. In 1859, a band of Northern men, in pursuance of a plan that had long been on foot — a band of armed men — made an incursion into Virginia, to excite insurrection, murder her peaceful citizens, and overthrow the Constitution of the State. But this did not arouse the conservative feelings of the North. The majority of the people there regarded the hero of that invasion as a martyr. And
1 2 3 4