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Louisa, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 1
secure any Union in which the rights of Virginia to re-assume all the powers she delegated to the Federal Government, and to declare her independence; and then to call into a Convention all the slaveholding States to determine what shall be the new construction necessary for their rights and protection in a Confederacy of slave States alone, or of the slave States and such free States as are willing to come into a Union, under this new construction, with the slave States. Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, rose to a point of order. The resolution of the gentleman from Chesterfield was an instruction to the Committee. He would ask if the amendment was also an instruction. The President said it was, and was therefore in order. Mr. Leake then addressed the Convention at considerable length in support of his amendment; but the time occupied in copying the document rendered it impossible for the reporter to take notes of his remarks. We understood him to maintain that Virginia ought to
Chesterfield (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
must take her stand, and his opinion was that a Border State Convention would make the question satisfactorily. The National difficulties. Mr. Cox. of Chesterfield, offered the following resolution for adoption: Resolved, That the Committee on Federal Relations be instructed to report, without delay, a plan is a Con measures. Mr. Leake, of Goochland, asked what was the question before the Convention? The President replied that the resolution of the gentleman from Chesterfield was under consideration. Mr. Leake proposed to amend the resolution by striking out all after the word "Resolved," and inserting the following: Resoe into a Union, under this new construction, with the slave States. Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, rose to a point of order. The resolution of the gentleman from Chesterfield was an instruction to the Committee. He would ask if the amendment was also an instruction. The President said it was, and was therefore in order. Mr
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
esist such exercise of power with all her means: Therefore, be it Resolved, That the Legislature of the State be requested to make all needful appropriations of means, and provide the necessary forces to resist and repel any attempt on the part of the Federal authorities to "hold, occupy, and possess the property and places" of the United States in any of the States that have withdrawn or may withdraw from the Union, or to collect the duties on imports in the same. Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, said that none of the resolutions met his approval. He spoke at some length on the Inaugural Address, the coercive policy of which he condemned, but thought, as the shock of the battle, which all anticipated, had come, it was the duty of the friends of the Union to stand firm. Mr. Branch, of Petersburg, approved the original resolution. It contained something practical, and was easy to understand; while that of the gentleman from Goochland was a volume of words, the application of
Brunswick, Me. (Maine, United States) (search for this): article 1
Virginia State Convention.Seventeenth day. Tuesday, March 5, 1861. The Convention was called to order at the usual hour. Prayer by the Rev. C. H. Read, of the 2d Presbyterian Church. Explanation. Mr.Mallory, of Brunswick, desired to explain the intent of his resolution, offered yesterday, having reference to a Convention of the Border States. In offering it, he had no ambition to gratify, and no expectation of winning laurels; but his position here required that he should explain it. He was sent here as a Union man, and he wished that the Union might have been preserved forever; but his constituents desired him to make no dishonorable sacrifices after the last effort had failed. The Peace Conference had failed to accomplish its purpose, and now he thought Virginia ought to take some action; hence he had proposed a resolution for a Conference among the Border States. He was opposed to the idea of a Central Confederacy, and if the question were presented to hi
New England (United States) (search for this): article 1
struction she ought to stand with the South in the assertion of her rights, and she ought to occupy no position in connexion with the North, in the state of things brought about by Northern aggressions which would cripple her power for her own defence, and prevent her from aiding in maintaining the rights and the equality of all the States. And that the said committee especially set forth the fact that, in consequence of the secession of the Southern States, and the hopeless condition of New England fanaticism, the blind hate of Black Republicanism, and the coercive policy indicated by the President of a dismembered Union, there is no hope of an amendment of the Constitution that can be satisfactory to Virginia, in the constitutional way; and that the only mode, in the circumstances which now surround us, to secure any Union in which the rights of Virginia to re-assume all the powers she delegated to the Federal Government, and to declare her independence; and then to call into a Con
Goochland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
slature to-day to put the State in an of defence, and he intended to offer a resolution instructing that body to appropriate money and devise a plan. He hoped the Convention would not commit itself to any half-way measures. Mr. Leake, of Goochland, asked what was the question before the Convention? The President replied that the resolution of the gentleman from Chesterfield was under consideration. Mr. Leake proposed to amend the resolution by striking out all after the word "Re anticipated, had come, it was the duty of the friends of the Union to stand firm. Mr. Branch, of Petersburg, approved the original resolution. It contained something practical, and was easy to understand; while that of the gentleman from Goochland was a volume of words, the application of which it was difficult to appreciate. He was opposed to hasty action. Mr. Early, of Franklin, reminded the Convention that only a telegraphic copy of the Inaugural had yet been received, and it wo
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
day announced from the Capitol at Washington, by him who was inaugurated as President of the United States as "the declared purpose of the Union that it will constitutionally defend and maintain itse in effecting a plan by which she, with all the said States, may unite themselves with the Confederate States of the South. Resolved, That in the formation of such a Union, Virginia would have a to all the States--and that in-such Union she should still the hope of re-forming "the United States of America" upon the basis of the present Constitution, so modified as to protect the rights of peollowing: Whereas, it is now plain that it is the purpose of the Chief Executive of the United States to plunge the country into civil war by using these power "to hold, occupy, and possess the art of the Federal authorities to "hold, occupy, and possess the property and places" of the United States in any of the States that have withdrawn or may withdraw from the Union, or to collect the d
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
tempt. Resolved, That in the hope of restoring harmony to all parts of the Union, and before determining to secede from it, but especially in order to secure the co-operation of the Border Slave States in any course she may pursue, the State of Virginia earnestly requests the speedy co-operation of the said States in effecting a plan by which she, with all the said States, may unite themselves with the Confederate States of the South. Resolved, That in the formation of such a Union, V"to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the government, and to collect the duties on imports" in all the States, as well as those that have withdrawn from, as those that have remained in the Union; and whereas the State of Virginia will resist such exercise of power with all her means: Therefore, be it Resolved, That the Legislature of the State be requested to make all needful appropriations of means, and provide the necessary forces to resist and repel any atte
round us, to secure any Union in which the rights of Virginia to re-assume all the powers she delegated to the Federal Government, and to declare her independence; and then to call into a Convention all the slaveholding States to determine what shall be the new construction necessary for their rights and protection in a Confederacy of slave States alone, or of the slave States and such free States as are willing to come into a Union, under this new construction, with the slave States. Mr. Ambler, of Louisa, rose to a point of order. The resolution of the gentleman from Chesterfield was an instruction to the Committee. He would ask if the amendment was also an instruction. The President said it was, and was therefore in order. Mr. Leake then addressed the Convention at considerable length in support of his amendment; but the time occupied in copying the document rendered it impossible for the reporter to take notes of his remarks. We understood him to maintain that Virg
than live on terms of inequality, he would tear the Union to fragments. Mr. Goggin said he had a series of resolutions to offer as a substitute. We could not tberty, and that they had the will (and he hoped the abilities to maintain it. Mr. Goggin went on to make further quotations from the Inaugural address, commenting the all who would rally around it. The following are the resolutions proposed by Mr. Goggin: Resolved, That any attempt on the part of the General Government to us prepared to repel any assaults which may be at all times made upon her. Mr. Goggin went on to say that he had prepared these resolutions without consultation winot be offered as a substitute for his, unless the rules were suspended. Mr. Goggin said he would withdraw them for the present, and offer them at a suitable timpied in the committee room, on this very subject, and only heard a portion of Mr. Goggin's remarks; and to that portion he gave his hearty concurrence and assent, but
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