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New England (United States) (search for this): article 5
onation, at regular intervals of perhaps three seconds. The police, on alert for air guns and other implements of assassination, walked up and down the line completely puzzled. The locale of the peculiar noise soon became narrowed down to the New England delegation, and pretty soon the facts of the case came out, creating no little amusement all around. It seems that the New England folks wear "pegged" boots and shoes pretty generally, and this season with extra heavy soles on account of the New England folks wear "pegged" boots and shoes pretty generally, and this season with extra heavy soles on account of the deep snows. Coming South, the unusual heat and dryness of the atmosphere here has shrunk the peg-timber in their foot-gear excessively, occasioning a general squeaking with every movement, swelling in the aggregate, when the delegation was keeping step in line, to a volume perceptible in the pauses of the Marine Band for several blocks. The National Guard battalion, Col. J. A. Tait, assembled at their armory at 9 A. M., and after going through the manual in a first-class manner, paraded th
California (California, United States) (search for this): article 5
delegation were headed by Marshal J. H. Hobart Ward. They wore badges of white satin with the words "New York" printed thereon. They numbered about 250. California delegation, numbering 50 men, headed by a carriage surrounded by the California campaign flag, the Stars and Stripes, with a bust of Lincoln and Hamlin on it, and under the bottom stripe a white field bearing the words, "California true to the Union."-- The carriage contained F. Stanford, late Republican candidate for Governor of California; D. W. Cheeseman, Lieut. Governor do.; S. H. Parker, ex-State Senator; Samuel Gamage, high private; and Master Willie Gamage, native Californian, beaCalifornia; D. W. Cheeseman, Lieut. Governor do.; S. H. Parker, ex-State Senator; Samuel Gamage, high private; and Master Willie Gamage, native Californian, bearing the flag above mentioned. Their marshal was Mr. Richard Chenery. The Virginia delegation, one hundred strong, bearing the U. S. flag, with the name of the State printed across it, and under the command of their marshal, Mr. George Rye. Never, in the history of Washington, was so immense a crowd of spectators seen on
Vermont (Vermont, United States) (search for this): article 5
been received into line, turned to the right face and escorted them to the Capitol. There were twenty-one military companies in the line, including one company of U. S. troops, and there were a number of civic associations. Among them the following: Republican Association and Wide-Awakes, numbering 500 men, the former designated by a silver button and the red-white-and-blue sprig, and the latter by a silver eagle on the lapel. They were headed by Capt. Smith. New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts delegations, each wearing an evergreen sprig in the lapel of the coat. They were headed by Marshals Gen. J. C. Abbott, Gen. H. H. Baxter, and Major Rogers. The three States turned out about 250 men in the line, and, as one of them told us, confidentially, with "nary office-seeker amongst them." Next came the great car of the Republican Association, placed on the running gear of one of Vanderwerken's large omnibuses, with pyramidal seats culminating in the centre, f
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
ing gear of one of Vanderwerken's large omnibuses, with pyramidal seats culminating in the centre, from which rose a staff surmounted with a large gold eagle. From this eagle depends a canopy, which covers the top of the car. The sides were draped with red, white and blue, and on each side was the word "Constitution" in large red letters. From the rear of the car projected a flag-staff, from which floated the stars and stripes. In front of the driver's seat was the coat of arms of the United States, surmounted by appropriate drapery. The car was drawn by six white horses, with white covers, on each of which the word "Union" was inscribed in large red letters.--In the car were 24 little girls, each dressed in white, with laurel wreaths, two of them representing the Goddess of Liberty, and the others each bearing the coat of arms of a State or Territory. The New York delegation were headed by Marshal J. H. Hobart Ward. They wore badges of white satin with the words "New York" p
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 5
nto line, turned to the right face and escorted them to the Capitol. There were twenty-one military companies in the line, including one company of U. S. troops, and there were a number of civic associations. Among them the following: Republican Association and Wide-Awakes, numbering 500 men, the former designated by a silver button and the red-white-and-blue sprig, and the latter by a silver eagle on the lapel. They were headed by Capt. Smith. New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts delegations, each wearing an evergreen sprig in the lapel of the coat. They were headed by Marshals Gen. J. C. Abbott, Gen. H. H. Baxter, and Major Rogers. The three States turned out about 250 men in the line, and, as one of them told us, confidentially, with "nary office-seeker amongst them." Next came the great car of the Republican Association, placed on the running gear of one of Vanderwerken's large omnibuses, with pyramidal seats culminating in the centre, from which rose a
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): article 5
elect having been received into line, turned to the right face and escorted them to the Capitol. There were twenty-one military companies in the line, including one company of U. S. troops, and there were a number of civic associations. Among them the following: Republican Association and Wide-Awakes, numbering 500 men, the former designated by a silver button and the red-white-and-blue sprig, and the latter by a silver eagle on the lapel. They were headed by Capt. Smith. New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts delegations, each wearing an evergreen sprig in the lapel of the coat. They were headed by Marshals Gen. J. C. Abbott, Gen. H. H. Baxter, and Major Rogers. The three States turned out about 250 men in the line, and, as one of them told us, confidentially, with "nary office-seeker amongst them." Next came the great car of the Republican Association, placed on the running gear of one of Vanderwerken's large omnibuses, with pyramidal seats culminating in t
F. Stanford (search for this): article 5
rms of a State or Territory. The New York delegation were headed by Marshal J. H. Hobart Ward. They wore badges of white satin with the words "New York" printed thereon. They numbered about 250. California delegation, numbering 50 men, headed by a carriage surrounded by the California campaign flag, the Stars and Stripes, with a bust of Lincoln and Hamlin on it, and under the bottom stripe a white field bearing the words, "California true to the Union."-- The carriage contained F. Stanford, late Republican candidate for Governor of California; D. W. Cheeseman, Lieut. Governor do.; S. H. Parker, ex-State Senator; Samuel Gamage, high private; and Master Willie Gamage, native Californian, bearing the flag above mentioned. Their marshal was Mr. Richard Chenery. The Virginia delegation, one hundred strong, bearing the U. S. flag, with the name of the State printed across it, and under the command of their marshal, Mr. George Rye. Never, in the history of Washington, wa
William H. Seward (search for this): article 5
The Presidential inauguration. The Washington papers bring the particulars of the inauguration of President Lincoln, on Monday. The day before was chiefly spent by the crowd in chasing about to the different churches to catch a glimpse of "Old Abe;" but as he was closeted all day with Senator Seward, they did not get a view of him. At night, he rode to the Capitol and heard Senator Crittenden's speech. Monday opened fair, but very dusty. Pennsylvania Avenue was swept, and the Washington Rifles were placed in detachments on the house-tops along the route, in order to sweep the people should an occasion offer. The National Rifles, Captain Schaeffer, remained at their Armory, in uniform, subject to order. The Washington Star says: A little after 12 o'clock the word was passed along the line of the infantry on the avenue, and the cavalry on 14th street, to present arms. This was handsomely done, when the President and President elect emerged from the lower (14th street) do
J. C. Abbott (search for this): article 5
the line, including one company of U. S. troops, and there were a number of civic associations. Among them the following: Republican Association and Wide-Awakes, numbering 500 men, the former designated by a silver button and the red-white-and-blue sprig, and the latter by a silver eagle on the lapel. They were headed by Capt. Smith. New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts delegations, each wearing an evergreen sprig in the lapel of the coat. They were headed by Marshals Gen. J. C. Abbott, Gen. H. H. Baxter, and Major Rogers. The three States turned out about 250 men in the line, and, as one of them told us, confidentially, with "nary office-seeker amongst them." Next came the great car of the Republican Association, placed on the running gear of one of Vanderwerken's large omnibuses, with pyramidal seats culminating in the centre, from which rose a staff surmounted with a large gold eagle. From this eagle depends a canopy, which covers the top of the car. The si
J. H. Hobart Ward (search for this): article 5
stripes. In front of the driver's seat was the coat of arms of the United States, surmounted by appropriate drapery. The car was drawn by six white horses, with white covers, on each of which the word "Union" was inscribed in large red letters.--In the car were 24 little girls, each dressed in white, with laurel wreaths, two of them representing the Goddess of Liberty, and the others each bearing the coat of arms of a State or Territory. The New York delegation were headed by Marshal J. H. Hobart Ward. They wore badges of white satin with the words "New York" printed thereon. They numbered about 250. California delegation, numbering 50 men, headed by a carriage surrounded by the California campaign flag, the Stars and Stripes, with a bust of Lincoln and Hamlin on it, and under the bottom stripe a white field bearing the words, "California true to the Union."-- The carriage contained F. Stanford, late Republican candidate for Governor of California; D. W. Cheeseman, Lieut.
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