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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 7
f pestilence or famine or other evils by which nations are often punished for their offences, we have recklessly put to hazard our inestimable blessings, and are entering that path of discord, and division, and border disputes, which, if there is any truth in history, must lead to most disastrous consequences. I do not allude to this fearful subject in any partisan spirit. I do not seek to investigate the causes which led to the present state of things. "But I indulge in the hope that, before it is too late, there will be a determination through the whole country — a firm determination — to cultivate feelings of friendship and harmony, accompanied by a manifestation of a spirit of conciliation and compromise, of justice, indeed, which may lead to the hope that, if the work is earnestly and promptly undertaken, we may succeed, under Providence, in re-establishing the integrity and the blessings of the Constitution, with the patriotic co-operation of the whole American people.
Reception of Gen. Cass at Detroit. A large concourse of citizens assembled at the depot at Detroit on the 1st inst., to welcome home Gen. Cass, the premier of the late administration. In reply to the address of welcome, the veteran, who has probably held public office for the last time, replied as follows: "Sir--The kind reception which my fellow-citizens of Detroit have given me, on this my return amongst them, has impressed me with profound emotions of gratitude. The recollectioGen. Cass, the premier of the late administration. In reply to the address of welcome, the veteran, who has probably held public office for the last time, replied as follows: "Sir--The kind reception which my fellow-citizens of Detroit have given me, on this my return amongst them, has impressed me with profound emotions of gratitude. The recollections and associations which press upon me render it impossible for me to do little more than acknowledge their kindness. My political career is ended, and I am warned that in the course of nature my life approaches its termination. I come back to the scene of my early labors and cares and exertions, endeared to me by many an interesting association to remain among you till, in the providence of God, I shall be called to meet that final change that sooner or later must come to all. A young adven
Reception of Gen. Cass at Detroit. A large concourse of citizens assembled at the depot at Detroit on the 1st inst., to welcome home Gen. Cass, the premier of the late administration. In reply to the address of welcome, the veteran, who has probably held public office for the last time, replied as follows: "Sir--The kind reception which my fellow-citizens of Detroit have given me, on this my return amongst them, has impressed me with profound emotions of gratitude. The recollections and associations which press upon me render it impossible for me to do little more than acknowledge their kindness. My political career is ended, and I am warned that in the course of nature my life approaches its termination. I come back to the scene of my early labors and cares and exertions, endeared to me by many an interesting association to remain among you till, in the providence of God, I shall be called to meet that final change that sooner or later must come to all. A young advent