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Death of Scribe. --The most prolific writer of the present age has just died in Paris. We allude to Eugene Scribe, the dramatist, who has written plays, operas, vaudevilles and other pieces for the stage, to the number, perhaps, of four or five hundred. The mere manual labor of such a mass of work seems to be too much for even a long lifetime. Scribe was the son of a silk-mercer in the Rue St. Denis, Paris, where he was born December 24th, 1791, so that he was in the seventieth year of his age. His first dramatic work, a vaudeville for the Gymnase, was produced when he was twenty-one. Since then he has averaged six or eight pieces a year, and nearly all of them have been successful. He had acquired great wealth, lived in princely style, was a member of the French Academy, and had received decorations and honors from various Governments of Europe besides his own.
December 24th, 1791 AD (search for this): article 6
Death of Scribe. --The most prolific writer of the present age has just died in Paris. We allude to Eugene Scribe, the dramatist, who has written plays, operas, vaudevilles and other pieces for the stage, to the number, perhaps, of four or five hundred. The mere manual labor of such a mass of work seems to be too much for even a long lifetime. Scribe was the son of a silk-mercer in the Rue St. Denis, Paris, where he was born December 24th, 1791, so that he was in the seventieth year of his age. His first dramatic work, a vaudeville for the Gymnase, was produced when he was twenty-one. Since then he has averaged six or eight pieces a year, and nearly all of them have been successful. He had acquired great wealth, lived in princely style, was a member of the French Academy, and had received decorations and honors from various Governments of Europe besides his own.