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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
ns, he referred to the history of the Constitution of the United States, where the terms are not used. In adopting that instrument, the question occurred as to how far slaves should count in the matter of representation. Southern politicians held that they should not be counted at all while the North thought they should be counted entire; and they compromised by taking three-fifths. In the fugitive slave clause, the term "persons held to service" was supplied by a Representative from South Carolina. They saw no necessity for changing the phrase in amending the Constitution, and he did not therefore think the propositions were obnoxious in that point of view. He went on to show that the Peace Conference propositions afforded equal protection with the Crittenden proposition, and in regard to the dividing line, he thought they acquired what was better. He had moved the Second section as a substitute for the section reported by the Committee in the Conference, for the purpose of
Rockingham, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
out the institution of slavery her vast wealth cannot be developed. He looked upon the Peace proposition as making a better disposition of the Territorial questions than the Crittenden proposition; equal in rights and privileges, and infinitely better in regard to that which may be before us in the future. Mr. Summers continued his argument at some length on other branches of the proposition, but without concluding, gave way to a motion to adjourn, which was submitted by Mr. Gray, of Rockingham, but withdrawn at the request of Mr. Macfarland, of Richmond, who stated that there were sundry claims for services rendered by persons previous to the organization of the Convention, and he offered a resolution for the appointment of a committee of three to audit such claims. Adopted. More minority reports. Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, submitted the following as a minority report from the Committee on Federal Relations: The Representatives of the People of Virginia, in Co
Goochland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
gentleman, but that (among other considerations) he had been selected from among the many who had been exerting themselves in behalf of the country. That minor objection he could have well waived; but his chief objection was that it brought up in an indirect form the question upon the merits of Mr. Crittenden's proposition. He thought the Convention had matters of direct importance to attend to. Mr. Brown, of Preston, made some remarks in favor of the resolution. Mr. Leake, of Goochland, offered to amend the resolution by adding-- Resolved. That the Convention does not mean hereby to approve or disapprove the measures proposed by the Peace Congress. Mr. Jackson, of Wood, moved the previous question, with a view to cut off the amendment, but the President stating that it did not so apply, the motion was withdrawn. Mr. Wickham, of Henrico, opposed the amendment, on the ground that the resolution and not carry with it an endorsement of the Crittenden propositi
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): article 1
on that the said amendments, if concurred in by the States hereinafter invited to conference, and engrafted upon the Constitution of the United States, will be satisfactory to the people of Virginia 2. The peculiar relations of the States of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas, to each other, and to the other States, make it proper, in the judgment of the Convention, that the former States should consult together for the maintenance of thng to provoke hostile collision; and on the other hand they invoke the seceded States to abstain from any act tending to produce such collision between them and the Federal authorities. Resolved, That the peculiar relations of the States of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri and Arkansas, to the other States, make it proper, in the judgment of this Convention, that the former States should consult together and concert such measures for their final ac
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
she can look with no favor or sympathy upon any conduct on their part tending to precipitate upon her people the horrors of civil war. 5. It is the belief of this Convention that the sectional controversies which divide the people of the United States, if not originated, have been greatly aggravated by the management of politicians for the advancement of personal and party schemes. They feel confident that if the people, North and South, can come to understand each other, they will find much withdrawal — the people of Virginia, without expressing any opinion upon the question of power, but in deference to the opinion of the Federal authorities, hereby declare their willingness to unite in conferring upon the Government of the United States the power, if it shall become necessary, to recognize the separate independence of the seceding States, and to make such treaties with them and to pass such laws as the separation may render proper. 7. In order to await the action of the
Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 1
on — and none were more hopeful than himself that they would be — they would have sufficient power to maintain it. In the present condition of things, with only eight slave States, it would be impossible. He called the Peace Conference Report "the first example of the self-protecting power of sections." The North were looking to future acquisitions as much as we were — perhaps more. It was said in Washington, by a very adroit and distinguished Northern politician, that they had an eye upon Canada, and it would come.--They were also looking to the Sandwich Islands. The Conference proposition puts a stop to such proceedings, unless by a majority of both sections. It enables you to settle all these matters in advance; it enables you to bargain; and unless it is settled fairly, it cannot be done at all. You can contest future acquisitions with them, foot by foot. With regard to Cuba, he said there was no trouble to be apprehended on that score; the North was more anxious to obtain it<
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 1
ter invited to conference, and engrafted upon the Constitution of the United States, will be satisfactory to the people of Virginia 2. The peculiar relations of the States of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas, to each other, and to the other States, make it proper, in the judgment of the Convention, that the former States should consult together for the maintenance of their rights in the Union, or, failing in that, to concert such measuthe seceded States to abstain from any act tending to produce such collision between them and the Federal authorities. Resolved, That the peculiar relations of the States of Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri and Arkansas, to the other States, make it proper, in the judgment of this Convention, that the former States should consult together and concert such measures for their final action as the honor, the interests and the safety of the people there
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 1
epresentatives from seven slaveholding States and fourteen non-slaveholding States; and while to some extent there was a disposition adverse to the views of the Southern members, he was gratified to find a more general disposition to restore harmony and to perpetuate the Union, especially on the part of the Commissioners from the border non-slaveholding States. Beyond that border line, Rhode Island through all proceeded in entire harmony with the wishes of those from the Southern States. New Jersey was with us throughout. Pennsylvania and Ohio, by a large majority of their Commissioners, exhibited a like purpose and spirit. There was a hopeful interest throughout for strengthening the bonds of Union, exhibited in the outstretching efforts on the part of those States. He also included Illinois and Indiana, the latter, however, did not vote on the final adoption of the propositions, declining to do so under instructions of her Legislature. After more further introductory remarks
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 1
e Commissioners from the border non-slaveholding States. Beyond that border line, Rhode Island through all proceeded in entire harmony with the wishes of those from the Southern States. New Jersey was with us throughout. Pennsylvania and Ohio, by a large majority of their Commissioners, exhibited a like purpose and spirit. There was a hopeful interest throughout for strengthening the bonds of Union, exhibited in the outstretching efforts on the part of those States. He also included Illinois and Indiana, the latter, however, did not vote on the final adoption of the propositions, declining to do so under instructions of her Legislature. After more further introductory remarks, he proceeded to consider the propositions, and gave his views at length upon each separate recommendation. In regard to the dividing line of 36 deg. 30 min., if that was an objection to these propositions, the same could be urged against Mr. Crittenden's, which the General Assembly had endorsed. They d
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 1
ce, desired to give his views of the proposition adopted by that body. The Conference was composed of representatives from seven slaveholding States and fourteen non-slaveholding States; and while to some extent there was a disposition adverse to the views of the Southern members, he was gratified to find a more general disposition to restore harmony and to perpetuate the Union, especially on the part of the Commissioners from the border non-slaveholding States. Beyond that border line, Rhode Island through all proceeded in entire harmony with the wishes of those from the Southern States. New Jersey was with us throughout. Pennsylvania and Ohio, by a large majority of their Commissioners, exhibited a like purpose and spirit. There was a hopeful interest throughout for strengthening the bonds of Union, exhibited in the outstretching efforts on the part of those States. He also included Illinois and Indiana, the latter, however, did not vote on the final adoption of the proposit
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