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Jamestown (Virginia) (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
high personal regard for that gentleman. But at the Courts of England and France this Government would be represented by men of Exeter Hall associations, who would go to preach tyrannies against the South. Was Virginia, then, to slink about in the possible hope of obtaining terms to remain in the Northern Confederacy, or was she to boldly stand up for her rights, and demand security for her rights? He alluded in eloquent terms to the records of the past, preserved upon the tombstones at Jamestown and at Yorktown, and appealed to the Convention, in the name of the illustrious men of former days, to take a position admitting of no doubt. He urged them to make the ultimatum strong — to say to the North, in the language of Canute to the waters of the great deep, "Thus far shalt thou come, and no farther." Tell them that the statu quo must be preserved as it is — that not another man must be sent to Fortress Monroe, Harper's Ferry, or to the fort on the Potomac. Alluding to a scurrilo
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
e N. Y. Times, where he was branded as a traitor, he said he had engaged in no political man ring with any party. The only communication he had received from South Carolina was a dispatch in reply to an effort for the preservation of peace. His correspondence was all with the North. He delighted to correspond with such noble mem until millions would not tell the amount. The exchanges of the world are regulated by cotton. And was all this to be thrown away because some thought that South Carolina had acted badly? After an eloquent tribute to South Carolina, he went on to consider the slight probability of benefit accruing to Virginia, by exchanging thSouth Carolina, he went on to consider the slight probability of benefit accruing to Virginia, by exchanging the trade with the South for a traffic in ice derived from the ponds of Massachusetts. Mr. Tyler said in closing, that he had presented the subject with as much force as he was capable of in his enfeebled condition, and thanked the Convention for the respectful attention given to his remarks. Mr. Conrad, of Frederick, said
Lunenburg, Ma. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
Virginia State Convention.twenty-fifth day. Thursday, March 14, 1861. The Convention was called to order at 12 o'clock Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Baker, of Grace Church, (Episcopal.) Voice of the people. Mr. Neblett, of Lunenburg, presented a series of resolutions adopted by the citizens of his county, favoring immediate secession, opposing a Border State Convention, and repudiating the Peace Conference propositions. Mr. Kent, of Wythe, presented the proceedings of a meeting held in that county, with resolutions in favor of an immediate withdrawal of Virginia from the Union, and against the consideration of any subjects by the Convention not appertaining to National affairs. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. The Peace propositions. The Presidentstated the pending question to be on the motion to refer to the Committee or Federal Relations the report from the Commissioners to the Peace Conference. Mr. Tyler, of Charles City, being enti
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 1
uring to citizens of each State the privileges and immunities of citizens of other States. --The Constitution already provided for that, and this enactment would give Congress an opportunity to legislate upon the subject. In Northern States, Massachusetts among others, movements were on foot to secure to negroes the rights of citizenship, and he supposed the case of a Southern Senator sitting cheek-by-jow! with a negro in the Senate of the United States. The section was voted against unanimoSouth Carolina had acted badly? After an eloquent tribute to South Carolina, he went on to consider the slight probability of benefit accruing to Virginia, by exchanging the trade with the South for a traffic in ice derived from the ponds of Massachusetts. Mr. Tyler said in closing, that he had presented the subject with as much force as he was capable of in his enfeebled condition, and thanked the Convention for the respectful attention given to his remarks. Mr. Conrad, of Frederick
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 1
the men of former days stood and battled for their rights of domain. and the patriotic motive existed there still. He alluded to the policy of the Administration as having been put forth insidiously to entrap the border slave States. The foreign appointments were sufficient to show the course of the future. Cassins M. Clay goes to Spain — a perfect fanatic on the subject of slavery. Cuba would not be acquired by the South under this Administration. The appointment of Mr. Corwin, to Mexico, was better. He expressed a high personal regard for that gentleman. But at the Courts of England and France this Government would be represented by men of Exeter Hall associations, who would go to preach tyrannies against the South. Was Virginia, then, to slink about in the possible hope of obtaining terms to remain in the Northern Confederacy, or was she to boldly stand up for her rights, and demand security for her rights? He alluded in eloquent terms to the records of the past, prese
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
d then the sceptre becomes theirs. He wanted the Convention to take sufficient time, and complete the work thoroughly, but not to be too slow, for the people were moving. Let Virginia act for herself — let her name her ultimatum — demand ample and full protection — and send it to the Border slave States, and to all the free States, telling them that if they cannot adopt the course proposed, Virginia cannot stay with them.--He had no tears of a division of sentiment between Eastern and Western Virginia. It was in the West that the men of former days stood and battled for their rights of domain. and the patriotic motive existed there still. He alluded to the policy of the Administration as having been put forth insidiously to entrap the border slave States. The foreign appointments were sufficient to show the course of the future. Cassins M. Clay goes to Spain — a perfect fanatic on the subject of slavery. Cuba would not be acquired by the South under this Administration. T
Canute (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): article 1
about in the possible hope of obtaining terms to remain in the Northern Confederacy, or was she to boldly stand up for her rights, and demand security for her rights? He alluded in eloquent terms to the records of the past, preserved upon the tombstones at Jamestown and at Yorktown, and appealed to the Convention, in the name of the illustrious men of former days, to take a position admitting of no doubt. He urged them to make the ultimatum strong — to say to the North, in the language of Canute to the waters of the great deep, "Thus far shalt thou come, and no farther." Tell them that the statu quo must be preserved as it is — that not another man must be sent to Fortress Monroe, Harper's Ferry, or to the fort on the Potomac. Alluding to a scurrilous attack upon him in the N. Y. Times, where he was branded as a traitor, he said he had engaged in no political man ring with any party. The only communication he had received from South Carolina was a dispatch in reply to an effort fo
Fort Pickens (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 1
ated by the couplet of the spider and the fly. If Virginia got into such a Convention, she would never get out again. It would not do for Virginia to told her arms in slumber — she must do something. The probable evacuation of Fort Sumter was here touched upon, and he spoke of his efforts with President Buchanan in that direction. He thought the proceeding commendable in Lincoln, even though the necessity was forced upon him. He wished that the same policy might be pursued in regard to Fort Pickens, and that the Southern Confederacy might be recognized, in order to save the fragments of the Union. But events portended that something else was in contemplation, and it would not do for Virginia to rest idly under a delusion. All eyes were now turned towards her. If chicanery or cajolery were practiced, it would be well for her to look to it with suspicion; if it were found necessary to increase the garrison at Fortress Monroe, it would be well for her to look to it, and prepare for a
Hanover Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Committee,) could not state with exactness; but he supposed by the end of this week, or on Monday next. Mr. Sheffey then moved to amend the resolution by striking out "to-morrow" and inserting "Monday next." Mr. Conrad opposed the amendment, and after some further remarks by Mr. Sheffey, it was rejected. The resolution having been changed by inserting the words "with the minority reports from said committee," was then adopted. Defence of the State. Mr. Richardson, of Hanover, moved to take from the table the following resolution, offered by himself on the 28th of February: Resolved, That in furtherance of the resolution adopted by this Convention on the 20th inst., seeking information of the Governor regarding the militia, the Adjutant General of the State be, and he is hereby, requested to communicate to this body, as speedily as is compatible with a thorough report on this subject, how many and what kind of arms are in the possession of the State, undist
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
rong — to say to the North, in the language of Canute to the waters of the great deep, "Thus far shalt thou come, and no farther." Tell them that the statu quo must be preserved as it is — that not another man must be sent to Fortress Monroe, Harper's Ferry, or to the fort on the Potomac. Alluding to a scurrilous attack upon him in the N. Y. Times, where he was branded as a traitor, he said he had engaged in no political man ring with any party. The only communication he had received from Soutght to be done for the protection of Virginia. There was, it is true, a formidable battery of words; and if we could believe all we hear, there were men not a hundred miles from Richmond who could eat half a dozen Yankees for breakfast, take Harper's Ferry and Fortress Monroe during the same day, and bring back the keys of those positions by supper time. He thought the men who talked the loudest would be found wanting in the hour of danger. He hoped the resolution would meet with no oppositio
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