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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
The points in the Constitution of the Confederate States. Vice-President Stephens was enthusiastically received at Augusta, Ga., Friday, on his way to Savannah. In a speech acknowledging the reception, he took occasion to explain the benefits of the Constitution of the Confederate States as contrasted with that of the Union from which they have withdrawn. In the first place, Congress is forbidden from fostering one branch of industry at the expense of another. Thus, the merchant, thand rivers. This was manifestly unjust, and was entirely obviated by the new Constitution. Under this one, each section can make its own improvements, and is authorized to levy a tax upon those who are benefited by such improvements.--Thus, if Savannah desires to improve her harbor, she can do so, and then levy a tax or duty upon the commerce benefited by such improvements. If Mobile or New Orleans, or any other port, desires to make improvements, they all have the same privilege, and hence G
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
The points in the Constitution of the Confederate States. Vice-President Stephens was enthusiastically received at Augusta, Ga., Friday, on his way to Savannah. In a speech acknowledging the reception, he took occasion to explain the benefits of the Constitution of the Confederate States as contrasted with that of the UnionConfederate States as contrasted with that of the Union from which they have withdrawn. In the first place, Congress is forbidden from fostering one branch of industry at the expense of another. Thus, the merchant, the mechanic, the business man, and the laborer, are all placed upon the same footing in that respect--one interest has no more claim to the protection of the Governmcipal and most important point of all — we have settled, and, I trust, settled forever, the great question which was the prime cause of our separation from the United States--I mean the question of African slavery. The old Constitution set out with a wrong idea on this subject; it was based upon an erroneous principle; it was foun
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
led the question of protection forever. In the second place, the question of internal improvements was also settled. Under the old Constitution, the improvements in one State were made often at the expense of another. Thus, for instance, Georgia, which had acquired the title of Empire State on account of her numerous improvements, had to pay several millions of dollars to the General Government, by way of duties, on the very iron which she used in those improvements; and out of these duh desires to improve her harbor, she can do so, and then levy a tax or duty upon the commerce benefited by such improvements. If Mobile or New Orleans, or any other port, desires to make improvements, they all have the same privilege, and hence Georgia will not have to pay for improving Mobile harbor, and vice versa. In a word, those who receive the benefits, will have to pay for them. This provision he considered wise and just. In the third place — and this is a very important improveme
Andrew Jackson (search for this): article 5
ot have to pay for improving Mobile harbor, and vice versa. In a word, those who receive the benefits, will have to pay for them. This provision he considered wise and just. In the third place — and this is a very important improvement upon the old Constitution --the public money is protected. We have been accustomed, in the old country, to hear the Presidents charged with the extravagance of the public expenditures. Thus we had heard of the extravagances of John Quincy Adams, of Andrew Jackson, of Martin Van Buren, and, finally, of Jas. Buchanan; but these extravagances were not really chargeable to the presidents. Their estimates of the probable expenditures had fallen short of the reality; thus, in some cases, the expenditures had increased two or three millions over the estimates; and, in the case of Mr. Buchanan, as much as twenty millions. His estimates were sixty millions, and yet Congress had appropriated eighty millions. It was generally the fault of the Congress, a
Martin Buren (search for this): article 5
mproving Mobile harbor, and vice versa. In a word, those who receive the benefits, will have to pay for them. This provision he considered wise and just. In the third place — and this is a very important improvement upon the old Constitution --the public money is protected. We have been accustomed, in the old country, to hear the Presidents charged with the extravagance of the public expenditures. Thus we had heard of the extravagances of John Quincy Adams, of Andrew Jackson, of Martin Van Buren, and, finally, of Jas. Buchanan; but these extravagances were not really chargeable to the presidents. Their estimates of the probable expenditures had fallen short of the reality; thus, in some cases, the expenditures had increased two or three millions over the estimates; and, in the case of Mr. Buchanan, as much as twenty millions. His estimates were sixty millions, and yet Congress had appropriated eighty millions. It was generally the fault of the Congress, and the result of log
James Buchanan (search for this): article 5
have been accustomed, in the old country, to hear the Presidents charged with the extravagance of the public expenditures. Thus we had heard of the extravagances of John Quincy Adams, of Andrew Jackson, of Martin Van Buren, and, finally, of Jas. Buchanan; but these extravagances were not really chargeable to the presidents. Their estimates of the probable expenditures had fallen short of the reality; thus, in some cases, the expenditures had increased two or three millions over the estimates; and, in the case of Mr. Buchanan, as much as twenty millions. His estimates were sixty millions, and yet Congress had appropriated eighty millions. It was generally the fault of the Congress, and the result of logrolling by the members. As, for instance, on the last night of a session, it frequently happened that in the hurry of finishing the business of the session, and passing the appropriation bill, some member would succeed in fastening upon it an appropriation of a million here, and an
John Quincy Adams (search for this): article 5
hence Georgia will not have to pay for improving Mobile harbor, and vice versa. In a word, those who receive the benefits, will have to pay for them. This provision he considered wise and just. In the third place — and this is a very important improvement upon the old Constitution --the public money is protected. We have been accustomed, in the old country, to hear the Presidents charged with the extravagance of the public expenditures. Thus we had heard of the extravagances of John Quincy Adams, of Andrew Jackson, of Martin Van Buren, and, finally, of Jas. Buchanan; but these extravagances were not really chargeable to the presidents. Their estimates of the probable expenditures had fallen short of the reality; thus, in some cases, the expenditures had increased two or three millions over the estimates; and, in the case of Mr. Buchanan, as much as twenty millions. His estimates were sixty millions, and yet Congress had appropriated eighty millions. It was generally the fau
The points in the Constitution of the Confederate States. Vice-President Stephens was enthusiastically received at Augusta, Ga., Friday, on his way to Savannah. In a speech acknowledging the reception, he took occasion to explain the benefits of the Constitution of the Confederate States as contrasted with that of the Union from which they have withdrawn. In the first place, Congress is forbidden from fostering one branch of industry at the expense of another. Thus, the merchant, the mechanic, the business man, and the laborer, are all placed upon the same footing in that respect--one interest has no more claim to the protection of the Government than another: and, therefore, honest labor can now work its own reward, by energy, industry, and perseverance. This he considered a wise provision; it settled the question of protection forever. In the second place, the question of internal improvements was also settled. Under the old Constitution, the improvements