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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ositions and instructing him to vote for an Ordinance of Secession. Mr. Barbour said he recognized the right of instruction, and was prepared to obey. The resolutions were, on motion of Mr. Barbour, laid on the table and ordered to be printed. Resolution of Inquiry. Mr. Montague, of Middlesex, offered the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, That the Clerk of this Convention inquire into, and report why the speeches of the Commissioners from South Carolina, Georgia, and Mississippi have not been printed, as ordered by the Convention. Committee of the Whole. The hour of 11 having arrived, the Convention went into Committee of the Whole, (Mr. Southall, of Albemarle, in the chair,) and proceeded to consider the reports from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, being entitled to the floor, proceeded to consider the Territorial question, to which he was alluding at the time of the adjournment on yesterday. He recapitu
Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ights. Voice of the people. Mr. Boisseau, of Dinwiddie, asked and obtained leave to present a series of resolutions adopted by the people of that county, in favor of immediate secession. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Marton, of Orange, asked and obtained leave to present a series of resolutions of similar import, adopted by the people of Greene county, on their last Court- day. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Marye, of Spotsylvania, asked and obtained leave to present a series of resolutions adopted by a portion of the citizens of that county, urging the immediate secession of Virginia, and opposing an adjournment of the Convention until next fall. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Barbour, of Culpeper, presented resolutions adopted by the people of that county, repudiating the Peace Conference propositions and instructing him to vote for an Ordinance of Secession. Mr. Barbour said he re
Dinwiddie Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
ate action. He thought it due to those who desired a change in the organic law, that the committees contemplated by the resolutions should be appointed to make the necessary inquiries. His people demanded that the question should be settled before action was had upon matters of National interest. When they were thus placed upon an equality with the people of other sections, they would stand shoulder to shoulder in defence of all our rights. Voice of the people. Mr. Boisseau, of Dinwiddie, asked and obtained leave to present a series of resolutions adopted by the people of that county, in favor of immediate secession. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Marton, of Orange, asked and obtained leave to present a series of resolutions of similar import, adopted by the people of Greene county, on their last Court- day. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Marye, of Spotsylvania, asked and obtained leave to present a series of re
Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) (search for this): article 1
ta, being entitled to the floor, proceeded to consider the Territorial question, to which he was alluding at the time of the adjournment on yesterday. He recapitulated the position that the present territory of the United States was unsuited to slave labor, while there was in the South such a deficiency as to lead to the serious contemplation of re-opening the African slave trade. With regard to the apprehension of the South becoming overrun with slaves, thus converting it into a second San Domingo, he argued that the tendency was the other way — that the demand always exceeded the supply. It had been urged by the gentleman from Albemarle, that in fifty years the South would become Africanized. His own opinion always had been that it would be hundreds of years before the South would require an outlet for the surplus of her slave population; and to sustain this view, he read from a speech in the Senate of the United States, by Mr. Hammond, of South Carolina, within the past year, i
Rockbridge (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
Mr. Wise begged to assure him that he never cried out crucify South Carolina; but had there been an attack upon her he would have fought side by side with him in her defence. Mr. Bruce went on to pay his respects to Messrs. Moore, of Rockbridge, and Baldwin, of Augusta, of whom he had little hope, and made humorous allusions which excited the merriment of the members as well as the spectators. The argument of the gentleman from Albemarle (Mr. Holcombe) as to the impossibility of turnmember of the Convention, and he hoped that all would remain after the adjournment and witness the ceremony. He then submitted a motion for adjournment, but withdrew it at the request of Mr. Dorman. Retaliatory Measure. Mr. Dorman, of Rockbridge, offered the following resolution: Resolved, That this Convention recommend to the General Assembly the passage of a law imposing a license tax on the sale by retail, within Virginia, of the products or manufactures of such Northern States
Brooklyn (New York, United States) (search for this): article 1
Virginia State Convention.thirty-third day. Saturday, March 23, 1861. The Convention was called to order at half-past 10 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Henry J. Van Dyke, (Presbyterian,) of Brooklyn, N. Y. Evening sessions. Mr. Conrad, of Frederick, offered the following resolution: Resolved. That on and after Monday next, and until further ordered, this Convention shall be called to order at 10 o'clock A. M., at half-past 10 shall resolve itself into Committee of the Whole, upon the reports from the Committee on Federal Relation; at 2 o'clock said Committee of the Whole shall take a recess until 4 o'clock, when it shall resume its session. Mr. Price, of Greenbrier, called the previous question, which was sustained, and the resolution was then adopted. Equality of taxation. The Convention proceeded to the consideration of unfinished business, namely, the resolutions of Mr. Willey, of Monongahela, in regard to the subjects of taxation and representati
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
e adjournment on yesterday. He recapitulated the position that the present territory of the United States was unsuited to slave labor, while there was in the South such a deficiency as to lead to tht, was expressed in one section of the report of the Committee, that "the Territories of the United States constitutes a trust, to be administered by the General Government, for the common benefit of the people of the United States, and any policy in respect to such Territories calculated to confer greater benefits on the people of one part of the United States than on the people of another partUnited States than on the people of another part, is contrary to equality and prejudicial to the rights of some for whose equal benefit the trust was created. If the equal admission of slave labor and free labor into any Territory, excites unfrie necessary for its proper development." He contended that no species of property in the United States should have more protection than the peculiar property of Virginia. He claimed full and per
Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 1
hat the demand always exceeded the supply. It had been urged by the gentleman from Albemarle, that in fifty years the South would become Africanized. His own opinion always had been that it would be hundreds of years before the South would require an outlet for the surplus of her slave population; and to sustain this view, he read from a speech in the Senate of the United States, by Mr. Hammond, of South Carolina, within the past year, in reply to a Republican Senator, (Mr. Doolittle, of Wisconsin,) in regard to this very apprehension. Mr. Hammond assumed the position that the South was capable, within its present limits, of sustaining a slave population of 200,000,000, and utterly repudiated the idea of a necessity for expansion in this respect, although he did not surrender any of the rights of the South to future acquisition. He believed with Senator Hammond that the South was fully able to take care of itself, when the question arises. He conceived that it would be for th
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 1
ies of resolutions adopted by the people of that county, in favor of immediate secession. Referred to the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Marton, of Orange, asked and obtained leave to present a series of resolutions of similar import, adopted by the people of Greene county, on their last Court- day. Referred tolad that some of those most distinguished on that side were now covered with sackcloth and penitential ashes. In this connection he alluded to the gentleman from Orange, (Mr. Morton.) Then proceeding to speak of the gentleman from Princess Anne. Mr. Wise begged to assure him that he never cried out crucify South Carolina; butection to the South, as well as the dangers of a border war, in the event of secession, he thought had been greatly overrated. At this point, Mr. Morton, of Orange, moved that the Committee rise. Mr. Bruce felt some delicacy in regard to this proposal. His constituents would never forgive him for occupying two days in
Charles City (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
nts were utterly valueless, for treaties would have to be made with people living beyond the limits of our constitutional law. We had an example of this in the acquisition of Texas, during the Administration of the distinguished gentleman from Charles City. He (Mr. B.) was perfectly satisfied to trust all matters touching the acquisition of new territory to the hands of Southern Senators. For himself, he did not incline to any further expansion. The third section, in regard to the protection mendment. As every point of objection urged to the Peace Conference propositions had been removed, in a spirit of deference to those who had criticised them, he thought they ought now to command the support of the distinguished gentleman from Charles City, and others who thought with him. He (Mr. B.) would not consent to a final settlement of the question by a Border Conference, or any other conference; but would reserve it for the ratification or rejection of the people. He thought when every
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