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United States (United States) (search for this): article 3
thern people, and a sentiment of hostility to our domestic institutions has been exhibited at the North, which is utterly at war with that fraternity which ought to pervade a Government instituted for mutual happiness and security. These feelings have at length ripened into disruption and a severance of seven of the States which heretofore composed the Union. The seceding States have now formed a Confederacy and established an independent Government, which ought to be recognized by the United States, and must be by the Governments of the world. With all these facts before us, and with a view to ascertain that judgment, and to give effect to the popular will, does hereby Resolve, That it shall be the duty of the Commissioners and officers who shall be appointed according to law to superintend and conduct elections for members of the General Assembly, at the next election in the month of May, to open a separate poll to take the sense of the qualified voters upon the question of
Submitting the question of North or South to the people. --Mr. Tomlin asked leave to offer the following preamble and joint resolutions, which, on his motion, were read, and laid on the table, with an intimation that they would be called up to-morrow: The General Assembly of Virginia, deeply impressed with the critical condition of National affairs, deems it proper at this time to submit to the people of the State the only question which seems to it necessary to be decided. As representatives of the people, we have every confidence in their decision, and believe they will be guided by prudence and wisdom, and that the action of the majority will be acquiesced in, and thenceforth we shall move in harmony and concord. The General Assembly has heretofore exerted its influence in endeavoring to preserve the Union and to avert the calamity of civil war between the States. All its efforts to that end have signally failed. This utter failure to compose the differences
racy and established an independent Government, which ought to be recognized by the United States, and must be by the Governments of the world. With all these facts before us, and with a view to ascertain that judgment, and to give effect to the popular will, does hereby Resolve, That it shall be the duty of the Commissioners and officers who shall be appointed according to law to superintend and conduct elections for members of the General Assembly, at the next election in the month of May, to open a separate poll to take the sense of the qualified voters upon the question of remaining in the Union with the Northern States, or of uniting Virginia with the Southern Confederacy. In order to ascertain the sense of said voters thereupon, the said officers shall cause to be kept a separate poll, with two columns, the one to be headed "For the Northern Union," and the other "For the Southern Union;" and the names of those who vote for the former shall be written under the former hea