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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 29, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Eton (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 16
Eton Etiquette. --The March number of the Cornhill Magazine opens with a satirical paper upon education at aristocratic Eton.--One passage records what seems a very mean transaction on the part of a head-master of a great public school, whose legitimate emoluments, from his pupils, are probably equal to some $25,000 a year. It seems that when an Eton boy is about to quit the school he usually "takes leave" of his tutor and of the headmaster. He waits on the head master, who expresses his sorrow at parting with him, his wishes for his future welfare, and sends his best compliments to his parents; the two then shake hands and the boy retires. As he eaves the room, a small table meets his eyes, on which is a plate with several bank notes displayed upon it. On this plate the boy deposits a note, varying from £10 to £25. It is said that the sons of dukes and railway kings go as high as £50
Eton Etiquette. --The March number of the Cornhill Magazine opens with a satirical paper upon education at aristocratic Eton.--One passage records what seems a very mean transaction on the part of a head-master of a great public school, whose legitimate emoluments, from his pupils, are probably equal to some $25,000 a year. It seems that when an Eton boy is about to quit the school he usually "takes leave" of his tutor and of the headmaster. He waits on the head master, who expresses his sorrow at parting with him, his wishes for his future welfare, and sends his best compliments to his parents; the two then shake hands and the boy retires. As he eaves the room, a small table meets his eyes, on which is a plate with several bank notes displayed upon it. On this plate the boy deposits a note, varying from £10 to £25. It is said that the sons of dukes and railway kings go as high as £50