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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 30, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Lunenburg, Ma. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 2
day as possible. He would therefore request the gentleman from Middlesex, (Mr. Montague,) to consult with his friends and bring in such a proposition as would be acceptable to them Mr. Price then moved that the Convention adjourn. Mr. Montague requested him to withdraw the motion for a moment, and he did so. Mr. Montague said his duties in the Senate would prevent his giving the matter due attention, and he hoped some other would be named. Mr. Price then selected Mr. Neblett, of Lunenburg. This gentleman, however, preferred that some more experienced member should undertake the duty, and Mr. Harvie, of Amelia, was named. Mr. Harvie said he thought the proposition was perfectly fair and honorable, and he would request his friends to meet at his room at night to consult upon the matter. He know of no motive for protracting the session, and thought it should be brought to a close as early as possible. This matter having been disposed of, Mr. Wise said he had a
Middlesex (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
esent, but it was necessary that it should be changed in some respects. He was desirous of making some arrangement that would satisfy all, and if the gentlemen on the other side were willing to some to a reasonable compromise of the matter, he would make to them this overture; if not — if there was any undeveloped motive for protracting the session, he must give them notice now that it must be brought to a close at as early a day as possible. He would therefore request the gentleman from Middlesex, (Mr. Montague,) to consult with his friends and bring in such a proposition as would be acceptable to them Mr. Price then moved that the Convention adjourn. Mr. Montague requested him to withdraw the motion for a moment, and he did so. Mr. Montague said his duties in the Senate would prevent his giving the matter due attention, and he hoped some other would be named. Mr. Price then selected Mr. Neblett, of Lunenburg. This gentleman, however, preferred that some more experienced
Halifax, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
nd said when any one wanted the keys of his office, there they were. He had no favors to ask. He alluded to the pestilence that once raged in Portsmouth and Norfolk, and to the pecuniary assistance then rendered by the Northern States to their suffering brethren of Virginia — sending collectively over $124,000.--Upon this manifestation of sympathy he dwelt with much earnestness, and with these considerations he closed his remarks, having spoken about seven hours. Mr. Flourney, of Halifax, took the floor, but gave way for a motion that the Committee rise. The Committee then rose and reported progress. In Convention. The President having resumed the Chair, the Convention proceeded to consider the resolution offered by Mr. Conrad this morning, to terminate debate in Committee of the Whole, on Tuesday next. Mr.Price, of Greenbrier, said the gentleman who offered the resolution was not present, but it was necessary that it should be changed in some respects.
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
d that we did not want to take our slaves to the Territories. During the Kansas excitement there was a great furore in Petersburg, and a bonus of $50 was offered to all who would emigrate, and $100 to every one who carried a slave. It was only required that they should stay until after the October election, when, if they thought proper, they could come back. Only twenty-five enlisted, and of these, not one was a slave-owner! A better illustration than this, he said, could be found in South Carolina. Not a single slaveholder will be fool enough to remove from his plantation there, to the finest fields that bloom in the great plains and valleys of the West. After some further consideration of this point, he proceeded to urge upon the Committee the report on the subject of Federal Relations, which he thought ought to satisfy every one. Before his constituents he took the ground that Virginia should set forth a catalogue of her wrongs, and the mode and measure of redress, and th
Amelia Court House (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
ing in such a proposition as would be acceptable to them Mr. Price then moved that the Convention adjourn. Mr. Montague requested him to withdraw the motion for a moment, and he did so. Mr. Montague said his duties in the Senate would prevent his giving the matter due attention, and he hoped some other would be named. Mr. Price then selected Mr. Neblett, of Lunenburg. This gentleman, however, preferred that some more experienced member should undertake the duty, and Mr. Harvie, of Amelia, was named. Mr. Harvie said he thought the proposition was perfectly fair and honorable, and he would request his friends to meet at his room at night to consult upon the matter. He know of no motive for protracting the session, and thought it should be brought to a close as early as possible. This matter having been disposed of, Mr. Wise said he had a substitute to offer for the propositions of the Committee on Federal Relations, embracing certain amendments to the Constitut
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
smashing the glass. Mr. Rives discussed the several sections of the report, expressing his concurrence therein. With regard to the objection against that portion providing for the remuneration of masters for slaves not recovered by the United States authorities, he made an arithmetical calculation, taking the number of slaveholders at 250,000, and the average value of the runaway slaves at $1,000; and the General Government having paid this to the master, even should the tax fall upon slurged a change in the agricultural system in order to retain them in Virginia. Towards the close of his remarks, in order to disabuse the minds of those who thought his enthusiasm for the Union was accounted for by the fact that he was a United States officer, he said he had made a calculation of the emoluments of his office, and found that since the 31st of December last he had received, as Collector of the Port of Petersburg, the enormous sum of twenty-five dollars and twenty-eight cents
Portsmouth, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
s accounted for by the fact that he was a United States officer, he said he had made a calculation of the emoluments of his office, and found that since the 31st of December last he had received, as Collector of the Port of Petersburg, the enormous sum of twenty-five dollars and twenty-eight cents!. He threw his keys upon the table before him, and said when any one wanted the keys of his office, there they were. He had no favors to ask. He alluded to the pestilence that once raged in Portsmouth and Norfolk, and to the pecuniary assistance then rendered by the Northern States to their suffering brethren of Virginia — sending collectively over $124,000.--Upon this manifestation of sympathy he dwelt with much earnestness, and with these considerations he closed his remarks, having spoken about seven hours. Mr. Flourney, of Halifax, took the floor, but gave way for a motion that the Committee rise. The Committee then rose and reported progress. In Convention. The P
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
r by the fact that he was a United States officer, he said he had made a calculation of the emoluments of his office, and found that since the 31st of December last he had received, as Collector of the Port of Petersburg, the enormous sum of twenty-five dollars and twenty-eight cents!. He threw his keys upon the table before him, and said when any one wanted the keys of his office, there they were. He had no favors to ask. He alluded to the pestilence that once raged in Portsmouth and Norfolk, and to the pecuniary assistance then rendered by the Northern States to their suffering brethren of Virginia — sending collectively over $124,000.--Upon this manifestation of sympathy he dwelt with much earnestness, and with these considerations he closed his remarks, having spoken about seven hours. Mr. Flourney, of Halifax, took the floor, but gave way for a motion that the Committee rise. The Committee then rose and reported progress. In Convention. The President havi
Evening session. The Committee was called to order by Mr. Southall at 4 o'clock P. M., and Mr. Rives resumed his remarks. He said it was his object to close his speech this evening, because he did not want it to be said that he consumed any more time than was necessary for an exposition of his views. He then proceeded to examine the existing causes of complaint against the North. With regard to the institution of African slavery, he said it was very easy for those who did not like it to get rid of their slaves, while those who did like it, sometimes found it very difficult to get them. He liked it, socially, morally, and politically, and he wished he could get a heap more of them. The election of Abraham Lincoln had been alluded to as a just cause of the dissolution of the Union. He averred that not one of those who supported Bell and Everett ever claimed that Lincoln's election would justify such a proceeding. He went further, and said that of all the Breckenridge spe
he resolution offered by Mr. Conrad this morning, to terminate debate in Committee of the Whole, on Tuesday next. Mr.Price, of Greenbrier, said the gentleman who offered the resolution was not present, but it was necessary that it should be cham Middlesex, (Mr. Montague,) to consult with his friends and bring in such a proposition as would be acceptable to them Mr. Price then moved that the Convention adjourn. Mr. Montague requested him to withdraw the motion for a moment, and he didis duties in the Senate would prevent his giving the matter due attention, and he hoped some other would be named. Mr. Price then selected Mr. Neblett, of Lunenburg. This gentleman, however, preferred that some more experienced member should ung for the passage of an Ordinance of Secession. He also presented a second petition, numerously signed, from the same county, on the other side of the question. Both were laid on the table. On motion of Mr. Price, the Convention adjourned.
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