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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: March 30, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Charles Reade (search for this): article 6
Dramatizing Novels. --The London Critic says that a case was argued before the Court of Common Bench, on Monday, which is of the highest importance to dramatists and the authors of works of fiction. Mr. Charles Reade brought an action against Mr. Conquest, of the Grecian Saloon, for producing a dramatic version of the novel entitled "It is Never Too Late to Mend." The facts were not denied by the defendant, but he pleaded that what he had done was not an infringement of Mr. Reade's copyroducing a dramatic version of the novel entitled "It is Never Too Late to Mend." The facts were not denied by the defendant, but he pleaded that what he had done was not an infringement of Mr. Reade's copyright. After the case had been argued, Mr. Justice Williams delivered judgment for the defendant, pronouncing that the public representation of a piece upon the stage was not a publication within the meaning of the statute of Anne, which gives the author of a book the copyright in his book.
Dramatizing Novels. --The London Critic says that a case was argued before the Court of Common Bench, on Monday, which is of the highest importance to dramatists and the authors of works of fiction. Mr. Charles Reade brought an action against Mr. Conquest, of the Grecian Saloon, for producing a dramatic version of the novel entitled "It is Never Too Late to Mend." The facts were not denied by the defendant, but he pleaded that what he had done was not an infringement of Mr. Reade's copyright. After the case had been argued, Mr. Justice Williams delivered judgment for the defendant, pronouncing that the public representation of a piece upon the stage was not a publication within the meaning of the statute of Anne, which gives the author of a book the copyright in his book.
D. T. Williams (search for this): article 6
Dramatizing Novels. --The London Critic says that a case was argued before the Court of Common Bench, on Monday, which is of the highest importance to dramatists and the authors of works of fiction. Mr. Charles Reade brought an action against Mr. Conquest, of the Grecian Saloon, for producing a dramatic version of the novel entitled "It is Never Too Late to Mend." The facts were not denied by the defendant, but he pleaded that what he had done was not an infringement of Mr. Reade's copyright. After the case had been argued, Mr. Justice Williams delivered judgment for the defendant, pronouncing that the public representation of a piece upon the stage was not a publication within the meaning of the statute of Anne, which gives the author of a book the copyright in his book.