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Fort Bedford (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
ak for himself. If he was an exception, so far as he (Mr. S.) was informed, he constituted a solitary exception. He would leave the gentleman from Princess Anne to explain his own position, though he understood that he, like the gentleman from Bedford, (Mr. Goggin,) was for immediate secession, but did not contemplate an immediate conjunction with the Southern Confederacy; that he was one who would wait for co-operation. Mr. Scott then went on to urge the necessity of a consultation with theWise desired to be informed if the gentleman classed him among those who entertained this hidden motive. Mr. Scott said he did not have him in his mind. Mr. Wise thought this was strange, when he had classed him with the gentleman from Bedford. Mr. Scott said he was now speaking of another class. Mr. Wise Said that so far as he was concerned, he wanted to form a better union of both the North and the South. What he did fear was the effect of the mode of adjustment proposed
West Virginia (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
er produce were boated down, and on the route had to meet the competition of the free States, as well as at the end of the route. Mr. Scott said he had supposed that the salt, coal and oil of the West found its market in the States bordering on their territory. The cattle of the West find a market in Pennsylvania and Maryland, and none of that great trade has its direction South. Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, and even New York, furnish the market which that great staple of Western Virginia finds practicable. He did not know about the pork and potatoes — They might be boated down the Ohio, to find a market in the South; but he spoke from information derived from others in regard to the salt, coal and oil, and in regard to the cattle trade he spoke from his own knowledge. He urged with force the position that this Convention ought to look to the whole and act for the whole and shape their measures with respect to all interests. Where opinions, conflict, we must yield
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 1
opinions were similar to those of Virginia, and whatever affected one affected all, rendering it necessary that they should act together. It was only necessary to satisfy our Western fellow citizens that by any action we might adopt they were not to be separated forever from the Border States, to bring them to consent to the policy proposed. There was an encouraging prospect of united action among the Border States, and it seemed impossible to conceive that Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois would ever consent to a separation from the States with whom their interests were so intimately connected. The purpose is to secure united action on the part of all the Border slave States; that when one secedes, all shall secede; thus bringing about the necessity for a reconstruction of the Union. But others said no; they contended for immediate secession. Yet they were not agreed among themselves upon the policy to be adopted. One says, go to the Southern Confederacy, and unite the fo
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
e part of all the Border slave States; that when one secedes, all shall secede; thus bringing about the necessity for a reconstruction of the Union. But others said no; they contended for immediate secession. Yet they were not agreed among themselves upon the policy to be adopted. One says, go to the Southern Confederacy, and unite the fortunes of Virginia with them; another says no — that's precipitate; you cannot get to the Southern Confederacy; you must wait for the co-operation of North Carolina and Tennessee. He would ask, then, if it would not be well to seek that co-operation before seceding? This, he thought, was the policy of the gentleman from Princess Anne. Mr. Wise hoped the gentleman would not undertake to state his position. He would do it at the proper time himself, if he had the lungs to do so. While up, he would correct the gentleman from Fauquier in his assertion that there was not our member who, in debate here, or in the Committee of Twenty-One or elsewhe
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
eral Relations. Mr. Nelson, of Clark, said that, with the permission of the gentleman from Fauquier, (who was entitled to the floor,) he would make a further correction of the report of his remarlemus Yellowlegs. He hoped he would be at last set right before the public. Mr. Scott, of Fauquier, being entitled to the floor, said if the Committee had confined itself to the discussion of thstruck at their vital existence. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, desired to inform the gentleman from Fauquier that he was mistaken as to the important points of trade for the West. The most important poinroper time himself, if he had the lungs to do so. While up, he would correct the gentleman from Fauquier in his assertion that there was not our member who, in debate here, or in the Committee of Twenome remarks were made by the Chairman to the effect that he did not consider the gentleman from Fauquier as impugning the motive of any particular member; had he done so, he would have called him to o
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
Border slave States; that when one secedes, all shall secede; thus bringing about the necessity for a reconstruction of the Union. But others said no; they contended for immediate secession. Yet they were not agreed among themselves upon the policy to be adopted. One says, go to the Southern Confederacy, and unite the fortunes of Virginia with them; another says no — that's precipitate; you cannot get to the Southern Confederacy; you must wait for the co-operation of North Carolina and Tennessee. He would ask, then, if it would not be well to seek that co-operation before seceding? This, he thought, was the policy of the gentleman from Princess Anne. Mr. Wise hoped the gentleman would not undertake to state his position. He would do it at the proper time himself, if he had the lungs to do so. While up, he would correct the gentleman from Fauquier in his assertion that there was not our member who, in debate here, or in the Committee of Twenty-One or elsewhere, had avowed o
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
terests and opinions were similar to those of Virginia, and whatever affected one affected all, rendering it necessary that they should act together. It was only necessary to satisfy our Western fellow citizens that by any action we might adopt they were not to be separated forever from the Border States, to bring them to consent to the policy proposed. There was an encouraging prospect of united action among the Border States, and it seemed impossible to conceive that Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois would ever consent to a separation from the States with whom their interests were so intimately connected. The purpose is to secure united action on the part of all the Border slave States; that when one secedes, all shall secede; thus bringing about the necessity for a reconstruction of the Union. But others said no; they contended for immediate secession. Yet they were not agreed among themselves upon the policy to be adopted. One says, go to the Southern Confederacy, and
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
whole Commonwealth. His own portion of the State was as deeply interested in the settlement of this question as any other portion. He lived on the borders of the Potomac, and the people there were connected commercially with the people of Maryland and Pennsylvania. If cut off from those advantages, a blow would be struck at their vital existence. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, desired to inform the gentleman from Fauquier that he was mistaken as to the important points of trade for the West. e free States, as well as at the end of the route. Mr. Scott said he had supposed that the salt, coal and oil of the West found its market in the States bordering on their territory. The cattle of the West find a market in Pennsylvania and Maryland, and none of that great trade has its direction South. Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, and even New York, furnish the market which that great staple of Western Virginia finds practicable. He did not know about the pork and potatoes — They
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): article 1
he people together in defence of her rights.--His people were willing to protect the institution of slavery, but they insisted that this property should be taxed as their horses and cows were taxed. Unless the demand were granted, they would have but a poor excuse to go before their people and ask them to protect the East, telling them at the same time that it was in the power of Eastern men to protect the West, but they refused it. If this was persisted in, it would be as easy to move the Alleghanies from their base as to convince the West of the propriety of going out of the Union for any present grievances. The hour of half-past 10 having arrived, Mr. Stuart suspended his remarks, and the Convention went into Committee of the whole. Mr. Southall taking the chair, for the purpose of considering the report of the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Nelson, of Clark, said that, with the permission of the gentleman from Fauquier, (who was entitled to the floor,) he
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
f this question as any other portion. He lived on the borders of the Potomac, and the people there were connected commercially with the people of Maryland and Pennsylvania. If cut off from those advantages, a blow would be struck at their vital existence. Mr. Hall, of Wetzel, desired to inform the gentleman from Fauquier thd he had supposed that the salt, coal and oil of the West found its market in the States bordering on their territory. The cattle of the West find a market in Pennsylvania and Maryland, and none of that great trade has its direction South. Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, and even New York, furnish the market which that greaem to consent to the policy proposed. There was an encouraging prospect of united action among the Border States, and it seemed impossible to conceive that Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois would ever consent to a separation from the States with whom their interests were so intimately connected. The purpose is to secure u
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