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Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 2
purpose of subjugating the people of such States to the Federal authority. The question being on Mr. Price's motion to pass by, Mr. Montague argued that it was contrary to the rules of the Committee. The yeas and nays were demanded by Mr. Wise, and motion to pass by was carried — yeas 68, nays 67. So the Committee passed by the 8th, and took up the 9th resolution, as follows: 9. The exercise of this right by the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas, without the assent of the other States, has given rise to new conditions, and presented questions touching those conditions intimately affecting the rights and safety of the other States Among these are the free navigation of the Mississippi River, the maintenance of the forts intended to protect the commerce of the Gulf of Mexico, and the power to restrain smuggling along the interior borders of the seceded States; but the Federal authorities, under the Constitution
Goochland (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
Evening session, The Committee re-assembled at 4 o'clock. Mr. Leake took the floor and advocated his amendment, offered previous to the recess.-- He contended that none of the propositions reported by the Committee on Federal Relations were sufficient to reach the root of the evil. Mr. Johnson, of Richmond, said he could not give his consent to the amendment, for it seemed to him that the gentleman from Goochland contemplated the execution of the higher law himself, to which he had objected, by going behind the Constitution and taking the matter into his own hands. It would be enough for him (Mr. J.) if he could obtain from a majority of the Northern people guarantees of sound constitutional amendments which would put at rest the question now agitating this too much distracted country.--He briefly stated his objections to the amendment, which he hoped would not be adopted. Mr. Leake replied, expressing his belief that the gentleman from Richmond had misapprehend
Fauquier (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
ite, Whitfield, Wickham, and Willey.--93. Mr. Blow, of Norfolk, moved to amend the resolution by striking out all after the word "States," (the same indicated by Mr. Macfarland,) and inserting in lieu thereof: "With a view to the peaceable adjustment of these and kindred questions, the people of Virginia hereby express their earnest desire that the Federal authorities, if so empowered, shall recognize the independence of the Confederate States of the South, and make such treaties with them, and pass such laws, as separation (if unavoidable) shall render proper and expedient." Mr. Blow urged the necessity of adopting this amendment, and Mr. Wise replied. Mr. Sheffey, of Smythe, moved to amend the amendment by striking out the words "If so empowered." Debated by Mr. Sheffey, and Mr. Scott, of Fauquier. Pending the consideration of Mr. Sheffey's amendment, on motion of Mr. Montague, the Committee rose, and On motion of Mr. Staples, the Convention adjourned.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 2
s 77, nays 58 Mr. Macfarland moved to further amend the 9th resolution, by striking out all after the word "States," (7th line,) and inserting the following: "To the adjustment whereof, and to the recognition of the independence of the Confederate States of the South, or their restoration to their former relations, as negotiation may eventuate, the Federal Government is hereby called upon to address itself." Mr. Macfarland, in advocating his amendment, said he proposed to follow it up ting in lieu thereof: "With a view to the peaceable adjustment of these and kindred questions, the people of Virginia hereby express their earnest desire that the Federal authorities, if so empowered, shall recognize the independence of the Confederate States of the South, and make such treaties with them, and pass such laws, as separation (if unavoidable) shall render proper and expedient." Mr. Blow urged the necessity of adopting this amendment, and Mr. Wise replied. Mr. Sheffey, of
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 2
power, shall be exerted for the purpose of subjugating the people of such States to the Federal authority. The question being on Mr. Price's motion to pass by, Mr. Montague argued that it was contrary to the rules of the Committee. The yeas and nays were demanded by Mr. Wise, and motion to pass by was carried — yeas 68, nays 67. So the Committee passed by the 8th, and took up the 9th resolution, as follows: 9. The exercise of this right by the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas, without the assent of the other States, has given rise to new conditions, and presented questions touching those conditions intimately affecting the rights and safety of the other States Among these are the free navigation of the Mississippi River, the maintenance of the forts intended to protect the commerce of the Gulf of Mexico, and the power to restrain smuggling along the interior borders of the seceded States; but the Federal autho
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
n part their power, shall be exerted for the purpose of subjugating the people of such States to the Federal authority. The question being on Mr. Price's motion to pass by, Mr. Montague argued that it was contrary to the rules of the Committee. The yeas and nays were demanded by Mr. Wise, and motion to pass by was carried — yeas 68, nays 67. So the Committee passed by the 8th, and took up the 9th resolution, as follows: 9. The exercise of this right by the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas, without the assent of the other States, has given rise to new conditions, and presented questions touching those conditions intimately affecting the rights and safety of the other States Among these are the free navigation of the Mississippi River, the maintenance of the forts intended to protect the commerce of the Gulf of Mexico, and the power to restrain smuggling along the interior borders of the seceded States; but the F
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 2
f subjugating the people of such States to the Federal authority. The question being on Mr. Price's motion to pass by, Mr. Montague argued that it was contrary to the rules of the Committee. The yeas and nays were demanded by Mr. Wise, and motion to pass by was carried — yeas 68, nays 67. So the Committee passed by the 8th, and took up the 9th resolution, as follows: 9. The exercise of this right by the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas, without the assent of the other States, has given rise to new conditions, and presented questions touching those conditions intimately affecting the rights and safety of the other States Among these are the free navigation of the Mississippi River, the maintenance of the forts intended to protect the commerce of the Gulf of Mexico, and the power to restrain smuggling along the interior borders of the seceded States; but the Federal authorities, under the Constitution as it is,
Gulf of Mexico (search for this): article 2
and took up the 9th resolution, as follows: 9. The exercise of this right by the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas, without the assent of the other States, has given rise to new conditions, and presented questions touching those conditions intimately affecting the rights and safety of the other States Among these are the free navigation of the Mississippi River, the maintenance of the forts intended to protect the commerce of the Gulf of Mexico, and the power to restrain smuggling along the interior borders of the seceded States; but the Federal authorities, under the Constitution as it is, disclaim power to recognize the withdrawal of any State from the Union, and consequently to deal with these questions, holding that it is reserved only to the States as parties to the Government compact to take lawful action touching them. Mr. Wise asked what "right" was referred to in the first line of the resolution? Something that
Robert Y. Conrad (search for this): article 2
ornton, Tredway, R. H. Turner, F. P. Turner, Tyler, Williams, Wilson, Wise, and Woods.--8. Nays.--Messrs. Armstrong. Aston, Baldwin, A. M. Barbour, Baylor, Berlin, Boggess, Brent. Brown, Burdett, Campbell, Carlile, Carter, C. B. Conrad, R. Y. Conrad, Couch, Critcher, Custis, Deskins, Early, French, Fugate, Gillespie, Gravely, Gray, Goggin, A. Hall, E. B. Hall, Hammond, Haymond, Hoge, Holladay, Hubbard, Jackson, Janney, M. Johnson, P. C. Johnston, Lewis McComas, McGrew, McNeil, Marshall, Miams, Wise, Woods, and Wysor.--40. Nays.--Messrs. Armstrong, Aston, Baldwin, A. M. Barbour, Baylor, Berlin, Blow. Jr., Boggess, Boyd, Brauch, Brent, Brown, Bruce, Burdett, Burley, Byrne, Campbell, Caperton, Carlile, Carter, C. B. Conrad, R. Y. Conrad, Couch, Critcher, Custis, Dent, Deskins, Dorman, Early, Echols, Flournoy, French, Fugate, Garland, Gillesple, Gravely, Gray, A. Hall, C. Hall, E. B. Hall, Hammond, Haymond, Hoge, Holladay, Hubbard, Jackson, Janney, Marmaduke Johnson, Peter C.
William C. Scott (search for this): article 2
ond, Hoge, Holladay, Hubbard, Jackson, Janney, M. Johnson, P. C. Johnston, Lewis McComas, McGrew, McNeil, Marshall, Maslin, Masters. Moffett, Moore, Nelson, Orrick, Osburn, Parks, Patrick, Pendleton, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, R. E. Scott, Wm. C. Scott, Sharp, Sitlington, Spurlock, Staples, A. H. H. Stuart, Chapman J. Stuart, Summers. Tarr, Tayloe, Waller, White, Wickham, and Willey.--71. The seventh resolution as amended by Mr. Wise, was then adopted. It now reads: 7. To remove Blakey, Boisseau. Borst, Bouldin, Chambliss, Chapman, Conn, Fisher, Graham, Goggin, John Goode, Jr., L. S. Hall, Harvie, Holcombe, Hunton, Isbell, Kent, Kindred, Leake, James B. Mallory, Montague, Morris, Morton, Neblett, Randolph, Richardson, Wm. C. Scott, Seawell, Speed, Strange, Thornton, Robt. H. Turner, F. B. Turner, Tyler, Williams, Wise, Woods, and Wysor.--40. Nays.--Messrs. Armstrong, Aston, Baldwin, A. M. Barbour, Baylor, Berlin, Blow. Jr., Boggess, Boyd, Brauch, Brent, Brown, Bru
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