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it; we cannot say what was on the other. But of one thing we are certain, before 6 o'clock the flag had split into three pieces. You will say that was ominous, and I agree with you. Several appointments to Federal offices have been made in this place. Our efficient and deservedly popular Postmaster, Mr. G. A. Cary, has been removed. Maj. J. B. Cary resigned the office he held, as Surveyor, Lincoln promptly filled it. It is reported other appointments have been made, but the report has yet to be confirmed. The time may soon come when certain representatives will have to give a strict account of their affiliation with Lincoln, Seward, Blair & Co. Would it not be better, infinitely better, to have representatives who have less sympathy with a Black Republican Administration ? The people will give a verdict at the approaching Spring election, and you may be sure they will find all such quality The weather has been very stormy during the past two days. Yours, &c., L.
C. S. Jones (search for this): article 11
man, are peace measures? Well, we shall soon learn more definitely what the Washington Government really intends to do. A Convention of Southern Rights men has been called, to assemble in Williamsburg the 22d of the present month, to nominate candidates for this Senatorial District; also, for the House of Delegates. A number of gentlemen, good and true, have been spoken of for both positions. There was a spirited meeting of Southern Rights men held in this place last Saturday. C. S. Jones, Esq., presided. Thorough secession resolutions were offered and unanimously adopted. It has been our good fortune to be present at a number of similar meetings. We have yet to attend one characterized by so much harmony, and, as above stated, so spirited. After the adjournment of the meeting, notice was given that a secession pole would be raised. The crowd immediately retired to the spot, and we soon had the pleasure of seeing the banner of the Confederated States floating in th
etings. We have yet to attend one characterized by so much harmony, and, as above stated, so spirited. After the adjournment of the meeting, notice was given that a secession pole would be raised. The crowd immediately retired to the spot, and we soon had the pleasure of seeing the banner of the Confederated States floating in the breeze. I have not the time or space to give a description of the eloquent speeches delivered on the occasion by Messrs. James Barron Hope, Thos. Tabb, B. P. Lee, Jr., and Wm. R. Willis. I have rarely witnessed such enthusiasm as was manifested by the large crowd in attendance. Lieut. Latimer, commanding a squad of the "Wythe Rifles," saluted the flag, firing "a round" for each seceded State. To-day we heard a Union flag would be raised in another part of the town. About two o'clock our attention was called to a flag with the motto, "the Constitution and the Union"on one side of it; we cannot say what was on the other. But of one thing we
James Barron Hope (search for this): article 11
present at a number of similar meetings. We have yet to attend one characterized by so much harmony, and, as above stated, so spirited. After the adjournment of the meeting, notice was given that a secession pole would be raised. The crowd immediately retired to the spot, and we soon had the pleasure of seeing the banner of the Confederated States floating in the breeze. I have not the time or space to give a description of the eloquent speeches delivered on the occasion by Messrs. James Barron Hope, Thos. Tabb, B. P. Lee, Jr., and Wm. R. Willis. I have rarely witnessed such enthusiasm as was manifested by the large crowd in attendance. Lieut. Latimer, commanding a squad of the "Wythe Rifles," saluted the flag, firing "a round" for each seceded State. To-day we heard a Union flag would be raised in another part of the town. About two o'clock our attention was called to a flag with the motto, "the Constitution and the Union"on one side of it; we cannot say what was
G. A. Cary (search for this): article 11
we heard a Union flag would be raised in another part of the town. About two o'clock our attention was called to a flag with the motto, "the Constitution and the Union"on one side of it; we cannot say what was on the other. But of one thing we are certain, before 6 o'clock the flag had split into three pieces. You will say that was ominous, and I agree with you. Several appointments to Federal offices have been made in this place. Our efficient and deservedly popular Postmaster, Mr. G. A. Cary, has been removed. Maj. J. B. Cary resigned the office he held, as Surveyor, Lincoln promptly filled it. It is reported other appointments have been made, but the report has yet to be confirmed. The time may soon come when certain representatives will have to give a strict account of their affiliation with Lincoln, Seward, Blair & Co. Would it not be better, infinitely better, to have representatives who have less sympathy with a Black Republican Administration ? The people will gi
J. B. Cary (search for this): article 11
d in another part of the town. About two o'clock our attention was called to a flag with the motto, "the Constitution and the Union"on one side of it; we cannot say what was on the other. But of one thing we are certain, before 6 o'clock the flag had split into three pieces. You will say that was ominous, and I agree with you. Several appointments to Federal offices have been made in this place. Our efficient and deservedly popular Postmaster, Mr. G. A. Cary, has been removed. Maj. J. B. Cary resigned the office he held, as Surveyor, Lincoln promptly filled it. It is reported other appointments have been made, but the report has yet to be confirmed. The time may soon come when certain representatives will have to give a strict account of their affiliation with Lincoln, Seward, Blair & Co. Would it not be better, infinitely better, to have representatives who have less sympathy with a Black Republican Administration ? The people will give a verdict at the approaching Spr
n Flag, Secession Speeches, Secession Ladies, and Secession Enthusiasm — Appointments to Office by Lincoln, &c., &c. Hampton, Va., April 8th, 1861. The Administration has finally defined its policy; not publicly, but stealthily--just Seward's fashion. I am inclined to the opinion that the Hon. J. S. Millson will soon find his error in this, as his constituents have found theirs in other instances; but they will correct theirs at the polls. He said, in Petersburg, "Lincoln is for p, Lincoln promptly filled it. It is reported other appointments have been made, but the report has yet to be confirmed. The time may soon come when certain representatives will have to give a strict account of their affiliation with Lincoln, Seward, Blair & Co. Would it not be better, infinitely better, to have representatives who have less sympathy with a Black Republican Administration ? The people will give a verdict at the approaching Spring election, and you may be sure they will find
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 11
sion Meeting, Secession Flag, Secession Speeches, Secession Ladies, and Secession Enthusiasm — Appointments to Office by Lincoln, &c., &c. Hampton, Va., April 8th, 1861. The Administration has finally defined its policy; not publicly, b constituents have found theirs in other instances; but they will correct theirs at the polls. He said, in Petersburg, "Lincoln is for peace." What does he think now? Probably the blockading of ports, collecting of revenue, and reinforcing Southerervedly popular Postmaster, Mr. G. A. Cary, has been removed. Maj. J. B. Cary resigned the office he held, as Surveyor, Lincoln promptly filled it. It is reported other appointments have been made, but the report has yet to be confirmed. The time may soon come when certain representatives will have to give a strict account of their affiliation with Lincoln, Seward, Blair & Co. Would it not be better, infinitely better, to have representatives who have less sympathy with a Black Republica
Thomas Tabb (search for this): article 11
of similar meetings. We have yet to attend one characterized by so much harmony, and, as above stated, so spirited. After the adjournment of the meeting, notice was given that a secession pole would be raised. The crowd immediately retired to the spot, and we soon had the pleasure of seeing the banner of the Confederated States floating in the breeze. I have not the time or space to give a description of the eloquent speeches delivered on the occasion by Messrs. James Barron Hope, Thos. Tabb, B. P. Lee, Jr., and Wm. R. Willis. I have rarely witnessed such enthusiasm as was manifested by the large crowd in attendance. Lieut. Latimer, commanding a squad of the "Wythe Rifles," saluted the flag, firing "a round" for each seceded State. To-day we heard a Union flag would be raised in another part of the town. About two o'clock our attention was called to a flag with the motto, "the Constitution and the Union"on one side of it; we cannot say what was on the other. But o
J. S. Millson (search for this): article 11
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. The Policy of the Administration is War--Convention of Southern Rights Men at Williamsburg — Secession Meeting, Secession Flag, Secession Speeches, Secession Ladies, and Secession Enthusiasm — Appointments to Office by Lincoln, &c., &c. Hampton, Va., April 8th, 1861. The Administration has finally defined its policy; not publicly, but stealthily--just Seward's fashion. I am inclined to the opinion that the Hon. J. S. Millson will soon find his error in this, as his constituents have found theirs in other instances; but they will correct theirs at the polls. He said, in Petersburg, "Lincoln is for peace." What does he think now? Probably the blockading of ports, collecting of revenue, and reinforcing Southern forts, in the opinion of the honorable gentleman, are peace measures? Well, we shall soon learn more definitely what the Washington Government really intends to do. A Convention of Southern Rights men has been cal
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