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John O'Callaghan (search for this): article 12
ccomplish from a Black Republican Government ? A petition is in circulation to-day to continue our present efficient postmaster in his place, Mr. Fontaine having received the appointment from master Abe. Since my last the Palmetto flag has been lowered, and a magnificent flag of the Southern Confederacy raised in its place, and now waves as proudly over-head as if the star of Virginia was emblazoned on its folds. The Dispatch I am happy to say, through the enterprise of Mr. John O'Callaghan, is once more circulated freely amongst our citizens. He tells me he expects to increase the list from fifty to one hundred before many days. I hope our citizens will aid Mr. O'C. all in their power, as he is really a most deserving gentleman. I notice Dr. Atkinson, of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, has been appointed track master on our road. The Doctor will find it a pretty hard road to travel, but from his well-known reputation as a road-master, the stockholders and other
Joseph Graham (search for this): article 12
and proved, to the satisfaction of the meeting, that to such men as Messrs. Martin, and his other wait-a-little-longer gentlemen, are we indebted for the present state of things we enjoy (?). He concluded by saying he was more of a Revolutionist than a Secessionist, and preferred being with his brethren of the South than tied to the tail of a Black Republican Union. The day's proceedings terminated by Wm. H. Cook, Esq., announcing himself a candidate for the Legislature, in place of Joseph Graham, Esq., the present incumbent. Mr. Cook is one of the most uncompromising Secessionists we have in the county, and will, no doubt, be warmly supported for the office, as the people here are ripe for Virginia taking her place at the head of the Southern Confederacy. Considerable regret was manifest at Gov. Floyd not announcing himself a candidate for Congressional honors. His feelings being entirely with the South, and having some hope that the State at some day will take her place besi
al Discussion — New Candidates--Post-Office--Southern Flag — Dispatch — Railroad News, &c. Wytheville, Va., April 8th, 1861. This being Court-day, our town presents a most animated appearance, notwithstanding it has been raining the last twenty-four hours, which prevents many of our citizens from attending. The Court was occupied most of the day with civil business, granting licenses, &c.--In the afternoon it was adjourned, in order to give the honorable Messrs. Martin and McMullan an opportunity of presenting their views on the political topics of the ay — both being Congressional aspirants for this District. Mr. Martin led off in a speech of an hour's length, in which he tried to explain the position he occupied, at present, as an Union man, which surprised his constituents here not a little, from the fact of his having signed a card, in connection with a majority of his colleagues, at Washington, recently, advocating Secession as the only remedy or salvation
ur present efficient postmaster in his place, Mr. Fontaine having received the appointment from master Abe. Since my last the Palmetto flag has been lowered, and a magnificent flag of the Southern Confederacy raised in its place, and now waves as proudly over-head as if the star of Virginia was emblazoned on its folds. The Dispatch I am happy to say, through the enterprise of Mr. John O'Callaghan, is once more circulated freely amongst our citizens. He tells me he expects to increase the list from fifty to one hundred before many days. I hope our citizens will aid Mr. O'C. all in their power, as he is really a most deserving gentleman. I notice Dr. Atkinson, of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, has been appointed track master on our road. The Doctor will find it a pretty hard road to travel, but from his well-known reputation as a road-master, the stockholders and others interested in the business will hall any improvement made with no ordinary gratification. Rute.
th than tied to the tail of a Black Republican Union. The day's proceedings terminated by Wm. H. Cook, Esq., announcing himself a candidate for the Legislature, in place of Joseph Graham, Esq., the present incumbent. Mr. Cook is one of the most uncompromising Secessionists we have in the county, and will, no doubt, be warmly supported for the office, as the people here are ripe for Virginia taking her place at the head of the Southern Confederacy. Considerable regret was manifest at Gov. Floyd not announcing himself a candidate for Congressional honors. His feelings being entirely with the South, and having some hope that the State at some day will take her place beside her Southern sisters; then, and not till then, will the Governor consent to serve her. Would that the other candidates would take a similar view of it, as what earthly advantage can our representatives expect to accomplish from a Black Republican Government ? A petition is in circulation to-day to continue
William H. Cook (search for this): article 12
e of things we enjoy (?). He concluded by saying he was more of a Revolutionist than a Secessionist, and preferred being with his brethren of the South than tied to the tail of a Black Republican Union. The day's proceedings terminated by Wm. H. Cook, Esq., announcing himself a candidate for the Legislature, in place of Joseph Graham, Esq., the present incumbent. Mr. Cook is one of the most uncompromising Secessionists we have in the county, and will, no doubt, be warmly supported for theMr. Cook is one of the most uncompromising Secessionists we have in the county, and will, no doubt, be warmly supported for the office, as the people here are ripe for Virginia taking her place at the head of the Southern Confederacy. Considerable regret was manifest at Gov. Floyd not announcing himself a candidate for Congressional honors. His feelings being entirely with the South, and having some hope that the State at some day will take her place beside her Southern sisters; then, and not till then, will the Governor consent to serve her. Would that the other candidates would take a similar view of it, as what ear
George T. Martin (search for this): article 12
ng. The Court was occupied most of the day with civil business, granting licenses, &c.--In the afternoon it was adjourned, in order to give the honorable Messrs. Martin and McMullan an opportunity of presenting their views on the political topics of the ay — both being Congressional aspirants for this District. Mr. MartiMr. Martin led off in a speech of an hour's length, in which he tried to explain the position he occupied, at present, as an Union man, which surprised his constituents here not a little, from the fact of his having signed a card, in connection with a majority of his colleagues, at Washington, recently, advocating Secession as the only remand, in his usual vigorous style, he reviewed the present distracted state of the country, and proved, to the satisfaction of the meeting, that to such men as Messrs. Martin, and his other wait-a-little-longer gentlemen, are we indebted for the present state of things we enjoy (?). He concluded by saying he was more of a Revolutio
ional honors. His feelings being entirely with the South, and having some hope that the State at some day will take her place beside her Southern sisters; then, and not till then, will the Governor consent to serve her. Would that the other candidates would take a similar view of it, as what earthly advantage can our representatives expect to accomplish from a Black Republican Government ? A petition is in circulation to-day to continue our present efficient postmaster in his place, Mr. Fontaine having received the appointment from master Abe. Since my last the Palmetto flag has been lowered, and a magnificent flag of the Southern Confederacy raised in its place, and now waves as proudly over-head as if the star of Virginia was emblazoned on its folds. The Dispatch I am happy to say, through the enterprise of Mr. John O'Callaghan, is once more circulated freely amongst our citizens. He tells me he expects to increase the list from fifty to one hundred before many days.
April 8th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 12
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch. Court Day — Political Discussion — New Candidates--Post-Office--Southern Flag — Dispatch — Railroad News, &c. Wytheville, Va., April 8th, 1861. This being Court-day, our town presents a most animated appearance, notwithstanding it has been raining the last twenty-four hours, which prevents many of our citizens from attending. The Court was occupied most of the day with civil business, granting licenses, &c.--In the afternoon it was adjourned, in order to give the honorable Messrs. Martin and McMullan an opportunity of presenting their views on the political topics of the ay — both being Congressional aspirants for this District. Mr. Martin led off in a speech of an hour's length, in which he tried to explain the position he occupied, at present, as an Union man, which surprised his constituents here not a little, from the fact of his having signed a card, in connection with a majority of his colleagues, at Washing